Things That Matter

Immigration Agents Launch Tear Gas Canisters At Asylum Seekers At US-Mexico Border

Asylum seekers rushed the San Ysidro border crossing in Tijuana.

Close to 1,000 of the asylum seekers from Honduras and Guatemala have reached the U.S.-Mexico border. The asylum seekers were blocked from using the official port of entry by Mexican federal agents on the Tijuana side, according to CNN. Undeterred, the migrants made their way across the Rio Grande River in an attempt to present themselves at the border to legally seek asylum.

United States Customs and Border Protection officers reacted to the group of asylum seekers rushing the border by throwing tear gas canisters into the crowd. According to the New York Times, more than two dozen tear gas canisters littered the Mexico side of the border after being thrown in different directions to push back against the asylum seekers.

“After being prevented from entering the Port of Entry, some of these migrants attempted to breach legacy fence infrastructure along the border and sought to harm CBP personnel by throwing projectiles at them,” United States Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said in a statement. “As I have continually stated, DHS will not tolerate this type of lawlessness and will not hesitate to shut down ports of entry for security and public safety reasons. We will also seek to prosecute to the fullest extent of the law anyone who destroys federal property, endangers our frontline operators, or violates our nation’s sovereignty.”

ABC News reported that border agents on the U.S. side of the border responded by closing the world’s busiest border crossing station connecting Tijuana and San Diego. The border was closed for several hours reopening on Sunday evening

The caravan of asylum seekers  peacefully marched more than 2,000 miles in a month to seek asylum. U.S. and international law allows for those seeking refuge the right to enter a country seeking asylum. Tijuana’s mayor, Juan Manuel Gastelum, called the influx of migrants in his city as a humanitarian crisis. Mayor Gastelum has called on the international community and Mexican government for assistance to help with the migrants currently in the city.

This is a developing story. Check back with mitú for updates as things develop.


READ: What You Need To Know About The Migrant Caravan That Is Heading Towards The US-Mexico Border

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His Mamá Lost Her Job So This 11-Year-Old Started Trading His Toys For Food To Help Out His Family

Things That Matter

His Mamá Lost Her Job So This 11-Year-Old Started Trading His Toys For Food To Help Out His Family

Carlos Luna / Facebook

Few communities have been spared by the Coronavirus pandemic. The economic impacts of the virus have left millions of people without jobs and families are struggling to make ends meet.

The situation is common all across Latin America – where millions of people work in the informal economy with little to no access to government aide. Despite the heartbreaking economic situations so many families currently face, some are getting creative in order to help put food on the table.

A boy in Tijuana has gone viral for offering up his toys in exchange for food to help feed his family.

Alexis, who is just 11-years-old, has had to grow up during some truly strange times. These challenging times are forcing all of us to reevaluate are priorities and figure out ways to help those close to us and in our communities.

For little Alexis, he saw that his family was facing a tough financial situation because of the Coronavirus pandemic. So he got creative and showed just how self-less he could be.

Alexis told Milenio, “Since my mom isn’t working anymore I’m worried. And I have two abuelos – my grandfather is blind and he was going to have surgery but they had to cancel it because of the Coronavirus.

The 11-year-old asked his mom how we could help her and that’s when he came up with an idea. He would get together his most previous toys and offer them up to people willing to exchange them for precious food items for the family.

Alexis’ story quickly went viral and people showed up to help him out.

¡Increíble gesto! 👏🧸 Niño de #Tijuana cambia sus juguetes por despensa para su mamá. Si deseas apoyar, están sobre la…

Posted by El Sol de Tijuana on Saturday, April 25, 2020

Alexis is offering up balls, stuffed animals, action figures, and other things that kids his age shouldn’t have to give up just to help his family put food on the table. But he’s doing it anyway.

Thankfully, the community has stepped up to help. In fact, the family was overwhelmed with support that they’ve now been able to share much of the donated goods with other families who face a similar situation.

Sadly, it hasn’t all been positive news since their story went viral.

According to the family, a man posed as a well-wisher coming by to drop off some donated food items to the family. Instead, after a short struggle the man robbed the mother of her cell phone and took off – also not having donated a single item to the family.

The local news had published the family’s address so people could arrive and provide assistance but, unfortunately, someone decided to take advantage.

Mexico has struggled to contain the Coronavirus outbreak and Baja California has been hit particularly hard.

It’s been give weeks since the first case of Covid-19 was diagnosed in Baja California. And the outlook for many of the state’s residents – especially those working in the informal sector – looks more and more complicated. Workers have had to find different ways to come up with new resources and income to help support their families.

Streets were once filled with vendors selling fresh mangos and tacos de canasta – now they’re selling hand sanitizer and face masks instead.

The economist José Luis Contreras Valenzuela has warned that many companies are also hurting as a result of having no customers. They’re likely to have to layoff even more staff. One example is the state’s restaurant industry which employers more than 200,000 people.

Just a few days ago, the head of the Ministry of the Economy, Mario Escobedo Carignan, pointed out that there were 11,000 lost jobs in Baja California, but this number is likely to grow.

Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Entertainment

Rihanna Revealed A Childhood Experience That She Says Connects Her To Mexican Migrants In The U.S.

Badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna has never been afraid to speak her mind. She’s a woman who speaks up for issues she cares about and people listen to her. That’s why so many love her – present company included.

The ‘Umbrella’ singer, how has been kind of off the musical radar as of late, spoke out in a new interview with British Vogue and she had a few things to say about her upcoming music, where she’s been living, and her relationship with migrant communities.

Rihanna continues to use her platform and reach of over 200 million followers across social media to bring awareness to social issues that are important to her.

Credit: Chesnot / WireImage

In an interview with Vogue, the creator of “Fenty Beauty” explained feeling empathy with Mexicans and Latinos who are discriminated against in the United States, since she says that she knows how it feels to be on the end of discriminatory policies.

“The Guyanese are like the Mexicans of Barbados,” she said. “So I identify—and that’s why I really relate and empathize with Mexican people or Latino people, who are discriminated against in America. I know what it feels like to have the immigration come into your home in the middle of the night and drag people out.”

Similarly, she recalled the times in which she suffered and the difficulties her and mother experienced when they emigrated from Barbados.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

Rihanna was born Robyn Rihanna Fenty in St. Michael, Barbados to a Guyanese mother and Barbadian father.

In the Vogue interview, she added: “Let’s say I know what that fight is like. I have witnessed it, I have been there. I think I was eight years old when I had to live that in the middle of the night. So I know how daunting it is for a child, and if my father had been dragged out of my house, I can guarantee you that my life would have been a disaster.”

In that same Vogue interview, Rihanna confessed to something that few people outsider her inner circle even knew.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

She explained that in recent years she has become a bit of a nomad, having a house in London, Paris, Barbados and Mexico, where she feels more relaxed.

“I just love Mexico. I really need to do my DNA test,” she jokingly told Afua Hirsch of Vogue. Perhaps she was an agave plant, in a past life, she pondered.

Rihanna has been vocal about immigrant rights in the past and takes great pride in her origins.

Credit: badgirlriri / Instagram

The Grammy Award winning singer and entrepreneur has very publicly thrown shade at President Trump over his cruel immigration policies.

Rihanna, who’s been appointed as the ambassador of her native country Barbados, is no stranger to political matters. She sent a cease-and-desist letter to President Donald Trump in early November after he played her music at one of his rallies. She also rejected the opportunity to perform during the Super Bowl LIII in February 2019 out of protest for Colin Kaepernick.

Plus, in an interview with The Cut last year about the word ‘immigrant’, she said: “For me, it’s a prideful word. To know that you can come from humble beginnings and just take over whatever you want to, dominate at whatever you put your mind to. The world becomes your oyster, and there’s no limit. Wherever I go, except for Barbados, I’m an immigrant. I think people forget that a lot of times.”