Things That Matter

A Los Angeles Street Vendor Was Brutally Attacked And His Plea For Help Is Making Some People Weep

Arcadio Bernardino, 66, has learned a living as a street vendor selling raspados for 10 years. This week he was brutally attacked in Los Angeles.

The attackers beat and kicked him until he lost a tooth and was left unconcious – in broad daylight. In a heartbreaking video, through tears, he’s begging the community for help in finding those who did this to him.

A 66-year-old man who sells raspados was brutally attacked and robbed of his $80 and he’s asking for your help.

Credit: @Univision34LA / Twitter

The brutal attacked happened near USC – just outside Downtown Los Angeles.

According to NBC LA, he was making his rounds when he was approached by two men at 3:30 p.m. He said one held him from behind while another grabbed his money bag. He was struck in the face, head, and body.

The attackers left him unconscious, knocked out a tooth, and stole his earnings for the day.

Through tears, he said the most painful thing was losing one of his teeth.

His daughter told NBC LA that she worries a lot about her papi out there working. But she said: “I don’t care about the money. I don’t care about anything but the pain he feels. It’s not fair.”

Twitter lit up with reactions of shock, anger, and those who wanted to help.

Credit: @oborraez / Twitter

From LA to North Carolina, tweets poured in with people expressing all sorts of emotions about the attack. With many questioning how truly disturbed peple have to be to attack an elderly man.

People were shocked that people could target a hard-working man just out there doing his job to support himself.

Credit: @oborraez / Twitter

Many sent support and love to him and his entire family.

Many shared that they see their own family members in this man’s tears and hard work.

Credit: @oborraez / Twitter

Men like Bernardino come to the US to provide a better life for their families than the one they had, so to see him attacked so brutally really struck a cord with the Latino community.

For a while, there wasn’t a GoFundMe page setup to help with costs and people demanded one!

Credit: @oborraez / Twitter

His daughter, probably after seeing all these people wanting and willing to help her father, launched a GoFundMe page to help with costs.

The attack on Bernardino sadly isn’t all that rare in Los Angeles.

Facebook/March And Rally Los Angeles

In July 2017, Benjamin Ramirez, an elote street vendor in Los Angeles, was threatened and had his food cart damaged by a man later identified as Carlos A. Hakas. Ramirez told Fox 11 Los Angelesthat he filmed the entire altercation on his phone because he was previously harassed by Hakas.

In their latest confrontation, Ramirez, 24, told Fox 11 that Hakas was behaving more aggressively, had a dog, and was holding something in his hand.

If you want to help Bernardino, his daughter setup a GoFundMe page and you can donate here.

READ: An Elotero Had His Cart Thrown To Ground And He Got It All On Video

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo Are The Women Fighting To Find The Stolen Children During The Argentine Dictatorship

Things That Matter

Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo Are The Women Fighting To Find The Stolen Children During The Argentine Dictatorship

Sundance Institute

During the 1970s a group of desperate Argentinian mothers began protesting government officials and holding them accountable for the human rights violations that had been committed in the military junta  known as the Dirty War. The determined women violated the government’s law against mass assembly and risked the ire of Argentina’s military dictatorship to expose the government’s human rights violations. The biggest part of their fight however had been to expose the kidnapping of over 30,000 individuals known today as “Desaparecidos” or “the disappeared.”

The Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo (or, the Asociación Madres de Plaza de Mayo) is a movement of Argentine mothers who campaigned to find out what happened to their children who had “disappeared” during the 1976 government takeover.

The mothers’ tragic stories began in 1976. At the time the Argentine military had toppled the presidency of Isabel Perón. According to History.com, “it was part of a larger series of political coups called Operation Condor, a campaign sponsored and supported by the United States.” The new military dictatorship resulted in the Dirty War, which was ultimately a fight against the Argentinian people. It opened doors to a period of state-sponsored torture and terrorism and saw the government turn against Argentina’s citizens, targeting those suspected of being aligned with leftist, socialist or social justice. As part of the rule of terror, the government kidnapped and killed an estimated 30,000 people. They also made great efforts to cover up the dead and missing people.

But the family members and friends of the missing victims fought for the truth.

The mothers and relatives of people who went missing during the war searched for their loved ones and began to stage protests at the Plaza de Mayo in the 1980s. 

According to History.com “Some of the mothers of the disappeared were grandmothers who had seen their daughters whisked away and presumably killed and their grandchildren given away to other families. Even after the Dirty War ended in 1983, the Grandmothers of the Plaza Mayo have searched for answers and worked to identify children who grew up without any knowledge of their true parents.”

Today the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo have verified the identities of 128 stolen children, thanks to DNA identification techniques but the fight of these mothers and grandmothers lives on. Sadly, thousands of Argentinian children remain missing.

The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo is a 1985 Argentine documentary film that highlights the Mothers of the Plaza de Mayo.

At the time of its release, it was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature and in 2013, received an update on “Abuelas: Grandmothers on a Mission” which highlights the work of the Grandmothers of the Plaza de Mayo in Argentina.

The Police’s Reaction To The Black Lives Matter Protests For George Floyd Vs. Anti-Quarantine Demonstrators Says A Lot

Things That Matter

The Police’s Reaction To The Black Lives Matter Protests For George Floyd Vs. Anti-Quarantine Demonstrators Says A Lot

Stephen Maturen / Stringer

Derek Chauvin (a 19-year veteran of the Minneapolis Police Department) pinned George Floyd to the ground by kneeling on his neck for seven minutes.

For the first three minutes of being restrained Floyd (a 46-year-old Black man) pled for his life begging Chauvin to remove his knee because he couldn’t breathe. After four minutes Floyd stopped moving, and bystanders capturing video of the request determined that he was unresponsive. The aftermath of his death after sparked explosive protests and reminders, yet again, that Black people are not safe in this country and continue to. be subjected to inequality.

On Tuesday morning, video of the incident that took place on a sidewalk in Minneapolis surfaced online fueling anger and protests.

There’s so much in the video that is distressing, but hearing Floyd begging the officer to let up and repeating “I can’t breathe” is only a small part that has once fueled the Black Lives Matter movement. After all, we’ve heard those words before. In 2014, Eric Garner, uttered the same ones while dying under police brutality in New York.

At the time of his death, Floyd had been facing arrest. The officers involved in the incident had been called to the scene due to a “forgery in progress” in the Powderhorn Park neighborhood of Minneapolis. Note, forgery while a serious crime is a non-violent one.

Darnella Frazier is the woman who captured the video on her phone and posted the footage on Facebook for the world to see.

On Tuesday, May 26, Minneapolis Police Chief Medaria Arradondo announced that the officers involved had been placed on leave. Later on in the day, four responding officers were fired and the Federal Bureau of Investigation announced the incident was being reviewed.

Reactions to the protests show another glaring reminder of the treatment of Black people in the United States vs. white.

Reactions to anti-mask protests and demonstrations against government stay-at-home orders in the past few weeks have been met with stoic reactions.

You’ve seen the images. In the face of demonstrators furious about the safety restrictions implemented to combat COVID-19, police officers and government officials have responded primarily with nonviolence. We’ve seen no stun grenades or tear gas.

But the crowds of Black protestors rallying for “Justice for George” have been met with riot gear and chemical agents. According to reports around 8:00 pm of the protests police in riot gear fired sandbag rounds, rubber bullets, and pepper spray.

Once again, Black people are being forced to fight for their lives while non-Black people of color get off easy while saying or doing little from the sidelines.