Things That Matter

A Quinceañera Is One Of The Most Special Celebrations So This Mexican Prison Organized One So Moms Didn’t Miss Out

One of the most emotionally taxing things for mothers and fathers that are incarcerated is missing their sons’ and daughters’ special moments. Graduations, first steps, heartbreaks, proms, soccer games and quinces: all of these are events that inmates generally experience behind bars through photos or tear-stained letters. All sense of normalcy vanishes when someone steps into a prison, and isolation can kick in and affect mental health. Depression and anxiety are common ailments in correctional facilities. 

So a recent initiative in a Mexican prison changed the lives of mothers whose daughters were about to have their quinces. This initiative helped strengthen family ties (which are precariously held when a loved one is serving a sentence) and surely lifted the spirits of mothers whose mistakes have also taken a toll on their loved ones. All in all, a great way to bridge reality inside and outside the prison. 

The prison of Santa Martha became a dance hall for an unforgettable quince.

Credit: InfoBae

Mexico City authorities and the NGO Alas de Amor (Wings of Love) organized a XV dance for daughters’ of female inmates at the Santa Martha Acatitla prison. There was a thanksgiving Catholic mass followed by a sit-down meal for families. We hope this is not the last time this event is organized and that correctional facilities elsewhere follow this example. 

Plenty of people pitched in so the young women could have a day to remember.

Flower shops from the world-famous Mercado de Jamaica donated the floral arrangements. Dancers from the studio Ballet Nuevo México acted as chambelanes for the traditional waltz. Before travelling to the prison, the festejadas gor their photo taken in front of the Antiguo Palacio del Ayuntamiento.

As EN24 reports: “This is the third year that this celebration takes place, and on this occasion merchants from La Lagunilla and the Tepito neighborhood, donated the dresses, shoes and accessories for the celebration.”

There is solidarity among el pueblo mexicano! After the party, they were taken around the city on one of Mexico City’s tourist buses. The progressive Mexico City government will likely promote this kind of events in the remaining five years of the current administration, led my Claudia Sheinbaum. 

And just look at that cake! Mordida, mordida, mordida!

With plenty of social stigma associated with inmates and their families, this was a great opportunity to make these women feel appreciated and for them to be able to regain their dignity, which surely has been manhandled during their journey through the judicial bureaucracy. After all, the prison system is supposed to work as an institution through which those who have made the wrong choices in life can get a second chance, but if prisons are hell on Earth then betterment can be tricky to say the least. 

It was a dreamy event in which mothers and daughters tightened their bond.

Teenage years are troubling and challenging for any young woman, and even more so if their mother is behind bars. One of the purposes of this initiative was to make sure that the emotional struggles of adolescence are lessened at least a little bit. Each young woman was allowed to invite ten external guests and five female inmates. It was a logistical challenge but for the third year in a row the outside world moved into the prison to provide a sense of normalcy to the inmates.  

And before you get all judgmental and say “well, criminals deserve what they got” you gotta know a little bit about the Mexican judicial system.

Credit: COHA

The Mexican judicial system is deeply flawed due to corrupt processes and to the fact that rather than someone being presumed innocent when they are arrested, they are presumed guilty and spend their time behind bars until their cases are resolved. Now, there is a decades-long bottleneck in the court system, which means that many of the inmates could potentially be innocent or have a waiting period behind bars that can end up being actually longer than the maximum sentence for the crime they were initially arrested for.

Added to this, Mexican jails are infamous for overpopulation, drug use, abusive guards and corruption. So before you get on your high horse give the inmates a break, shall we? Things are of course more complicated for female inmates as they are often abandoned to their own devices by associates whose modus operandi is to dispose of women in an abusive manner. The Mexican judicial system is also tough on women, as there is a social stigma that affects those who are arrested while being mothers. They are judged as malas madres and treated in a tough and sometimes cruel way by judges and authorities. 

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This Mexican College Student Is Going Viral For Breeding the Largest Bunnies In the World

Things That Matter

This Mexican College Student Is Going Viral For Breeding the Largest Bunnies In the World

Photo via yakinkiro/Instagram

Look out Bad Bunny. There’s another breed of bunny in town that’s taking the internet by storm. A college student in Mexico recently went viral for the oddest thing. He has genetically engineered a strain of rabbits to be the largest in the world.

21-year-old Kiro Yakin has become a viral sensation after internet users have seen him with pictures of the giant bunnies he genetically engineered.

Yakin, a student at the Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla on the Xicotepec campus, is studying veterinary and animal husbandry. He began his experimentation by breeding two unique rabbit types together. The Flemish Giant rabbit and other, longer-eared bunnies that Yakin happened to notice. As a result, his monster-bunny was born.

According to Yakin, his experimental bunnies grow up to 22 pounds  Flemish Giant, while the average Flemish giant weighs 15 pounds. But make no mistake, Yakin’s bunny experiment was no accident. “It takes an average of 3 to 4 years to reproduce this giant species,” he told Sintesis.

Yakin’s ultimate goal is to breed a rabbit that can grow up to 30 pounds. “I am currently studying genetics to see how to grow this breed of giant rabbits more,” he said.

Yakin, who has had a soft spot for rabbits since he was a child (pun intended), now cares for a whopping fifty giant rabbits out of his parents’ home.

Luckily, his parents are supportive enough of his dream that they support their son (and his bunnies) financially. “I have the financial support and support of my parents to buy food a week for all 50 giant rabbits,” Yakin told Sintesis.

But he also admitted his project has a long way to go. “So far I have not set aside the time or budget that is required to start the project more seriously,” he said.

The only thing that’s preventing Yakin from committing all his time and energy to creating even bigger bunnies is–what else?–money.

Photo via yakinkiro/Instagram

Although he already submitted a proposal to his university to try and expand his research, as of now, he is self-financed. However, Yakin makes a bit of extra cash by selling the giant bunnies to private customers.

His ultimate goal though, is to open up a large, professional farm where he can breed and cross-breed his bunnies to his heart’s content.

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Mexicans Travel To U.S. For ‘Vaccine Tourism’ Say It’s A Matter Of Survival

Things That Matter

Mexicans Travel To U.S. For ‘Vaccine Tourism’ Say It’s A Matter Of Survival

The United States is one of the world’s most successful countries when it comes to rolling out the COVID-19 vaccine program. So far, more than 200 million vaccines have been administered across the U.S. and as of this week anyone over the age of 16 is now eligible.

Meanwhile, in many countries around the world – including Mexico – the vaccine roll out is still highly restricted. For many, who can afford to travel, they see the best option at a shot in the arm to take a trip to the U.S. where many locations are reporting a surplus in vaccines.

Wealthy Latin Americans travel to U.S. to get COVID vaccines.

People of means from Latin America are chartering planes, booking commercial flights, buying bus tickets and renting cars to get the vaccine in the United States due to lack of supply back in their home countries. Some of those making the trip include politicians, TV personalities, business executives and a soccer team.

There is an old Mexican joke: God tells a Mexican he has only a week left to live but can ask for one final wish, no matter how outrageous. So the Mexican asks for a ticket to Houston—for a second opinion.

Virginia Gónzalez and her husband flew from Mexico to Texas and then boarded a bus to a vaccination site. They made the trip again for a second dose. The couple from Monterrey, Mexico, acted on the advice of the doctor treating the husband for prostate cancer. In all, they logged 1,400 miles for two round trips.

“It’s a matter of survival,” Gónzalez told NBC News, of getting a COVID-19 vaccine in the United States. “In Mexico, officials didn’t buy enough vaccines. It’s like they don’t care about their citizens.”

Mexico has a vaccine rollout plan but it’s been too slow in many people’s opinions.

With a population of nearly 130 million people, Mexico has secured more vaccines than many Latin American nations — about 18 million doses as of Monday from the U.S., China, Russia and India. Most of those have been given to health care workers, people over 60 and some teachers, who so far are the only ones eligible. Most other Latin American countries, except for Chile, are in the same situation or worse.

So vaccine seekers who can afford to travel are coming to the United States to avoid the long wait, including people from as far as Paraguay. Those who make the trip must obtain a tourist visa and have enough money to pay for required coronavirus tests, plane tickets, hotel rooms, rental cars and other expenses.

There is little that is fair about the global race for the COVID-19 vaccine, despite international attempts to avoid the current disparities. In Israel, a country of 9 million people, half of the population has received at least one dose, while plenty of countries have yet to receive any. While the U.S. could vaccinate 70 percent of its population by September 2021 at the current rollout rate, it could take Mexico until approximately the year 2024 to achieve the same results.

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