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ICE Confirms That A Mexican Man Has Died Of Cardiac Arrest While In Their Custody And How Does This Keep Happening

We often hear of children dying while in ICE custody. But adult migrants are also dying while being detained by the US government. And the latest victim is a 44-year-old Mexican national who died at a hospital in Georgia.

Official cause of death has been listed as cardiac arrest but he was also complaining of abdominal pain – which is what he was initially taken into the hospital for.

Pedro Arriago-Santoya, a detained migrant from Mexico, has died at a Georgia hospital while in ICE custody.

Credit: @CNN / Twitter

The Mexican national died at Piedmont Midtown Medical Center in Columbus, with staff there identifying his preliminary cause of death as cardio-pulmonary arrest. Secondary causes of death were listed as multi-organ system failure; endocarditis, or an infection of the inner linings of the heart; diluted cardiomyopathy, or a reduced ability by the heart to pump blood; and respiratory failure.

On June 6, he had been ordered deported by an immigration judge and was sent to Stewart Detention Center in Lumpkin, Georgia.

The man is at least the 7th victim to die while in ICE custody since October.

Credit: @lesleyabravanel / Twitter

Although there have been several reported deaths of migrant children while in ICE custody, adult migrants have also fallen victim to the system.

Arraigo-Santoyo is just the latest victim to die, in part, thanks to Trump’s inhumane immigration policies.

The man had been detained at the Stewart Facility, which had become infamous for safety concerns.

Credit: @Haleaziz / Twitter

Last year, federal investigators found that the Stewart Detention Center has seen incidents of drug smuggling, medical staff shortages, and safety issues, according to documents first published by the Center for Investigative Reporting and Atlanta radio station WABE.

According to officials, the man died of cardiac arrest after arriving at the hospital.

Credit: @ajplus / Twitter

On July 20, he was taken to a local hospital after complaining of abdominal pain. Two days later, he went into cardiac arrest and was placed on a ventilator and moved to the intensive care ward, where he remained comatose until he went into cardiac arrest again on Wednesday.

Many hoped that the Mexican government would demand an independent inquiry so we can have a clearer picture of what really happened.

Credit: @LoriBezahler / Twitter

Given the lack of information and sometimes conflicting information the public gets from ICE and Border Patrol, many are skeptical of their responses.

While some on Twitter demanded hearings immediately.

Credit: @Haleaziz / Twitter

Several of the victims who have died while in ICE custody have been dying of preventable or treatable illnesses. Many pointed out that children shouldn’t be dying of the flu with all the medical resources we have available in the US.

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As Covid-19 Cases Surge At ICE Detention Centers, Many Are Asking How The Government Plans To Help

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As Covid-19 Cases Surge At ICE Detention Centers, Many Are Asking How The Government Plans To Help

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The Coronavirus pandemic has shined a light on the horrible and inhumane conditions inside ICE detention centers across the country. Unfortunately, the renewed scrutiny has resulted in very few meaningful changes and the virus continues to rage unchecked at several detention centers.

Experts say that ICE detention centers have been on notice since the beginning of the pandemic when its own public health experts were warning about the possibility of outbreaks.

“Inability to social distance, the effect of transfers, on exacerbating outbreaks. They’ve been on notice of all of this. Yet they have continued to have this very dangerous behavior of moving people around the country and exposing people,” one legal expert told ABC News.

At one Virgina facility, more than 90% of detainees have tested positive for Coronavirus.

At the Farmville Detention Center in Virginia, there are 315 total confirmed cases of COVID-19 at the Farmville Detention Center. The total number of people detained at Farmville is 360. That means nearly 90 percent of the population has COVID-19. And that’s according to ICE’s own numbers.

Lawyers representing a group of immigrant detainees at the ICE Detention Center in Farmville claim the facility overestimated their ability to handle detainee transfers, resulting in a spike of COVID-19 cases. They say the facility accepted a transfer of more than 70 detainees from Covid-19 hotspots, Arizona and Florida.

For their part, ICE says “The health, welfare and safety of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) detainees is one of the agency’s highest priorities. During COVID-19, ICE has taken important steps to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 in its detention centers the agency, including the use of expanded voluntary COVID-19 testing for detainees in the agency’s custody.”

They added in a separate statement that “Medical checks are done twice daily, including a temperature screening and medication disbursement. Every detainee who needs medical attention is being seen. Farmville staff have worked diligently to keep detainees informed of the developing situation as it evolves through education and updates from medical staff on coronavirus symptoms and how their care and custody will be managed.”

Employees at ICE facilities are also at high-risk for contracting the disease.

Across the country in Arizona, which is experiencing one of the country’s worst outbreaks of the virus, ICE facilities are also dangerous for employees. CoreCivic, which operates two ICE facilities in the state, has said that 103 employees have tested positive for the virus.

CoreCivic released the new numbers on positive cases days after the death of a senior correctional officer at the Eloy Detention Center was attributed to COVID-19.

Conditions inside immigration detention centers during the pandemic are widely criticized by advocates, immigration lawyers, and immigrants held in the facilities. They describe the dangers of infection while being held in confined spaces in large groups, a lack of soap and personal protective gear, and other complaints.

Detainees have shared their experiences with their attorneys saying that there is a lack of social distancing and isolation space, and that many are denied proper medical care if they contract COVID-19.

Meanwhile, some ICE facilities actually prohibit the use of face masks.

According to a report by the AP, San Diego’s Otay Mesa facility – one of the largest in the country – actually prohibited face masks. The warden’s reasoning was that it would scare both employees and detainees. And in the weeks that followed, Otay Mesa Detention Center would see the first big outbreak at U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s 221 detention centers.

Although the outbreak’s origins are uncertain, several workers and detainees have shared the meager conditions inside the centers and how the private company is managing the disease. There was an early absence of facial coverings, and a lack of cleaning supplies. Symptomatic detainees were mixed with others.

Shortly after the initial outbreak at San Diego’s Otay Mesa facility, centers across the country began to experience their own outbreaks. The Associated Press found at Otay Mesa: 19% of facility directors said there weren’t enough standard surgical masks, 32% said there weren’t enough N95 respirator masks, and 37% felt there wasn’t enough hand sanitizer for detainees.

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A Third Man Has Died In ICE Custody After Testing Positive For Covid-19

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A Third Man Has Died In ICE Custody After Testing Positive For Covid-19

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As ICE continues to detain thousand of migrants across the country in crowded detention centers, the pandemic continues to claim lives. This time a 51-year-old Mexican man has died after testing positive for Covid-19 while in ICE custody.

For months, migrant and refugee rights organizations have implored the U.S. Department of Homeland Security – the agency that oversees ICE – to release all people in their custody to avoid mass contagion. The fear has been that keeping thousands of people in close quarters and without proper access to medical care could result in the deaths of countless people. But the agency refuses to listen, and it’s costing lives.

ICE announced that a third man has died in their custody after battling a Coronavirus infection.

A 51-year-old Mexican man, Onoval Perez-Montufa, has been announced as the latest victim to die of Coronavirus infection while in ICE custody. Perez-Montufa has been in ICE custody since June 15, when he was released from a Massachusetts prison and was being held by ICE at the Glades County Detention Center in Florida before he died on Sunday.

Perez-Montufa had been hospitalized for nearly two weeks as he attempted to fight off his Covid-19 infection. He entered the Palm Beach Country hospital on July 1 after reporting shortness of breath while in ICE detention.

He tested positive for COVID-19 on July 2, ICE said. The cause of death on Sunday was not immediately known.

Reports of the man’s death drew swift condemnation from immigrant rights organizations, who’ve been pushing for weeks for ICE to release more detainees from its facilities and arguing coronavirus poses a deadly threat to immigrants behind bars.

The death comes more than a month after a Guatemalan man who tested positive for COVID-19 died in ICE custody.

Unfortunately, Perez-Montufa is not the only victim of ICE’s continued detention policy amid a global health pandemic. His death comes a month after a 34-year-old Guatemalan man who had tested positive for COVID-19 died in ICE custody at a Georgia hospital in May.

That man, 34-year-old Santiago Baten-Oxlaj, had been in ICE custody at Stewart Detention Center since early March, the agency confirmed in a statement.

Baten-Oxlaj was the second confirmed victim of the virus while in ICE custody after a man from El Salvador died in early May.

Migrants in detention centers are at increased risk for the disease.

According to ICE’s own data, there are currently 883 cases of Covid-19 among the nearly 23,000 detainees in ICE custody. That’s an overall infection rate of nearly 4% – far above the national average.

And since the very start of the Coronavirus pandemic, medical experts and immigrant rights activists have warned about the growing risk detainees would face. They’ve long pointed out the inherent difficulties within detention centers – such as a lack of necessary space to accommodate proper social distancing guidelines – that put people in danger. Not to mention that the agency has long faced accusations of providing inadequate medical care to detainees. Advocates have used these arguments as a way to push for more releases.

At the beginning of the pandemic, ICE did asses their detainee population and decided to relocate vulnerable detainees, including those who are over 60 or are pregnant. Meanwhile, several federal judges have ordered ICE to release more than 500 detainees, citing the preexisting medical conditions of the immigrants released and the potential for life-threatening complications from COVID-19.

Despite the ongoing deaths and sky high infection rates, ICE said in a press release: “ICE is firmly committed to the health and welfare of all those in its custody and is undertaking a comprehensive, agency-wide review of this incident.”

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