Things That Matter

A GOP Candidate For Senate Just Suggested Annexing All Of Mexico And Apparently He Isn’t Joking

Immigration from Central America and Mexico continues to be a hot topic among both the public and politicians. While some still rally for the closing of deadly and inhuman migration centers along the Southern U.S. border, others feed into anti-immigrant sentiment and the far-right’s so-called solutions to migration. Though unimpressive and expensive, Trump’s border wall is also still a favorite among conservative supporters. Still, other ideas are being shared to “fix” the issue with migration — and this latest one is pretty laughable. 

A GOP candidate for Arizona’s Senate race recently suggested annexing Mexico (yes, the whole country) into the United States in order to bypass issues of Southern migration. 

Twitter / @Newsweek

Daniel McCarthy is a cosmetic company executive from Glendale, Arizona who announced his candidacy for the Arizona state Senate in August. Running against incumbent Senator Martha McSally for the Republican primary, the new politician has called for a return to “authenticity and integrity.” One of his biggest platform points is solving the immigration problem. 

While making his rounds to raise support for his campaign, McCarthy stopped by iHeartRadio for an interview with host Garret Lewis. That’s where he shared his outrageous solution for the Mexico-United States border conflict. While proposing his idea that Mexico be annexed into the U.S., McCarthy suggested that the U.S. could benefit from some new “beachfront property” after the acquisition. 

“There is a process to become states for the United States,” McCarthy explained, citing the Constitution’s requirements for admitting new states. “Clearly 30 million Mexican illegal immigrants want to be United States citizens, probably half the country wants to be United States citizens. There’s a reason they’re coming here.”

Though he still supports Trump’s border wall, McCarthy appealed to Mexican citizens with his suggestion of incorporating Mexico as a state. 

Twitter / @OficialEnLaMira

McCarthy cited what he suggested were unsavory living conditions for all of the Mexican people. 

“They live in hell,” he expressed. “Their government is corrupt. The cartels are destroying these peoples’ lives. Personally, I think the power brokers in D.C. don’t want the American people to start thinking about how easily useless politicians can be removed.”

With these grievances in mind, he prompted the people of Mexico to “rise up” and fight for statehood.

“I want to speak above the Mexican government,” the Republican candidate stated. “When you’re talking to the Mexican citizens, ‘Rise up in your communities and petition to become states for the United States.’ That’s how that process works. By the way, it’s not that challenging.”

As unfounded as McCarthy’s plan is, it also ignores the main source of current migration at the Southern border. 

Twitter /@PeriodismoHoyMX

Though migrants are attempting to enter the U.S. from the Mexican border, the majority of those detained are from Central America. According to DHS Office of Inspector General statistics that were released earlier this year, the majority of migrants seeking asylum at the Southern border are from Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. 

These countries experience a high level of crime and violence along with having a population stricken by poverty. In Guatemala, 60% of the population live below the poverty line while contending with a corrupt and ineffective national government. Honduras is worse off with 65% of its population living in abject poverty. It’s from this poverty and violence that these migrants flee. Annexing Mexico wouldn’t solve their problems as they are not Mexican citizens. 

For the most part, the reaction to McCarty’s suggestion has been to ridicule it as an outrageous idea. Since then, the Republican candidate has slightly walked back his proposal and called it “kind of a joke.”

This annexation plan wasn’t the only bit of ridiculousness to come from McCarthy recently.

Twitter / @PhilipWegmann

On Monday, the first time candidate posted a comment on a Facebook group for Republicans that is drawing a lot of criticism. In response to doubt about his fitness as a candidate, McCarthy wrote, “I am qualified for the job. Jesus was 33 when he saved the world.” 

McCarthy later did an interview with “The Arizona Republic” and attempted to defend the comparison. According to the 34 year-old candidate, the Facebook group had negatively brought up his age before and the comment was made to explain how age shouldn’t be a factor in the race. 

“I would never compare myself to Jesus,” McCarthy said in the interview. “I would never even come close to comparing myself to Jesus Christ. I made reference to his age when he was crucified.”

Later the same day, he tweeted out another comparison of himself to Jesus. “Show me the lie,” the since deleted Tweet read. “They also hated Jesus because He spoke the truth.”

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Things That Matter

Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

Things That Matter

Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

When it comes to international happiness rankings, Mexico has long done well in many measurements. In fact, in 2019, Mexico placed number 23 beating out every other Latin American country except for Costa Rica. But in 2020, things looks a lot different as the country slipped 23 spots on the list. What does this mean for Mexico and its residents? 

Mexico slips 23 spots on the World Happiness Report thanks to a variety of compelling factors.

Mexico plummeted 23 places to the 46th happiest nation in the world, according to the 2020 happiness rankings in the latest edition of the United Nations’ World Happiness Report. The coronavirus pandemic had a significant impact on Mexicans’ happiness in 2020, the new report indicates.

“Covid-19 has shaken, taken, and reshaped lives everywhere,” the report noted, and that is especially true in Mexico, where almost 200,000 people have lost their lives to the disease and millions lost their jobs last year as the economy recorded its worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Based on results of the Gallup World Poll as well as an analysis of data related to the happiness impacts of Covid-19, Mexico’s score on the World Happiness Report index was 5.96, an 8% slump compared to its average score between 2017 and 2019 when its average ranking was 23rd.

The only nations that dropped more than Mexico – the worst country to be in during the pandemic, according to an analysis by the Bloomberg news agency – were El Salvador, the Philippines and Benin.

Mexico has struggled especially hard against the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Since the pandemic started, Mexico has fared far worse than many other countries across Latin America. Today, there are reports that Mexico has been undercounting and underreporting both the number of confirmed cases and the number of deaths. Given this reality, the country is 2nd worst in the world when it comes to number of suspected deaths, with more than 200,000 people dead. 

Could the happiness level have an impact on this year’s elections?

Given that Mexico’s decline in the rankings appears related to the severity of the coronavirus pandemic here, one might assume that the popularity of the federal government – which has been widely condemned for its management of the crisis from both a health and economic perspective – would take a hit.

But a poll published earlier this month found that 55.9% of respondents approved of President López Obrador’s management of the pandemic and 44% indicated that they would vote for the ruling Morena party if the election for federal deputies were held the day they were polled.

Support for Morena, which apparently got a shot in the arm from the national vaccination program even as it proceeded slowly, was more than four times higher than that for the two main opposition parties, the PAN and the PRI.

Still, Mexico’s slide in the happiness rankings could give López Obrador – who has claimed that ordinary Mexicans are happier with him in office – pause for thought.

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