Things That Matter

A ‘Good Morning America’ Reporter Went Live On Air With No Pants And Let’s Try And Learn From His Big Mistake

I would say we can all relate to this major fumble by a ‘Good Morning America’ reporter – but then again I’ve never been caught not actually wearing pants on any of my Zoom calls.

Sure, millions of us are currently encerradas thanks to the Coronavirus pandemic – doing our jobs from the bed, desk, sofa, and kitchen table – in various states of dress. But, I don’t think many of us would forget we’re not wearing pants. Especially, when live on national television.

Unfortunately, reporter Will Reeves did forget. And it’s a moment that he won’t soon forget.

He Went On ‘GMA’ Wearing No Pants, Not Realizing We Could All See

It turns out, there may be a downside to quarantine making us all super-casual dressers. Reporter Will Reeves had a live video call on ABC’s ‘Good Morning America’, and he got all suited up donning a dress shirt and suit jacket. But turns out he just couldn’t be bothered to put some pants on.

He had gone live to discuss a story about drones beginning to deliver medication in Florida. Camera framing and digital graphics made it appear as though he was fully dressed in the beginning of the segment. But toward the end, his bare legs began to show onscreen. 

Reeve himself is taking his 15-minutes of fame with a sense of humor.

“I have ARRIVED… in the most hilariously mortifying way possible,” Reeve joked after photos of his appearance went viral online. 

He went on to explain that he had started to get ready for “a post-GMA workout a little too soon,” and is now rethinking his morning routine.

“Any sartorial tips from (online commenters) who are wearing a belt, trousers and shoes during their work video calls at home are most welcome,” he wrote on Twitter. “Now, back to work. Wearing pants. Hope everyone got a much needed laugh.” We did Will, we really did.

Now let this reporter’s mistake serve as a PSA to all of us doing video calls from home.

Reeve’s wardrobe malfunction may have given us that viral moment of the week, and a much-needed laugh, but let’s be real: this could very well happen to you. So let’s use this moment to remember to get properly dressed for a meeting or make sure that the camera won’t show anything we don’t want seen. And, if you’re looking for some super great backgrounds for your next videollamada, we’ve got them all right here for you.

This Laundry Detergent Cap Hack Will Blow Your Mind

Things That Matter

This Laundry Detergent Cap Hack Will Blow Your Mind

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Moms have blessed us with an amazing laundry fact that has apparently been around forever. Turns out that plastic lid cup that comes with your washing detergent is so much than for measuring liquid.

A little known fact was shared in the private Facebook group Mums Who Clean and the tip-off has reeled in millions of comments and views.

While all of us probably use the lids of our detergent bottles for measuring out the soup it turns out you’re meant to put the plastic lid or cup into the wash with your load. That way all of the detergent soap can be rinsed from it. This means that not only do your clothes get the exact amount of detergent it needs but it also means that this method will keep you from getting that messy soap up in your cup.

When the load is finished you scoop out the squeaky clean cup and use it for next time!

Don’t forget to be careful!

This hack doesn’t apply to all caps. Some brands will specify that the cup can’t be added i to your wash. According to news.com.au “There could be a risk of damaging parts and components, within the bowl itself, in relation to the agitator…It could get caught or trapped under the agitator or damage the fins of the agitator. Also it could damage the plastic cup you put in, resulting in bits of plastic going through your clothes.”

Working From Home Can Impact Your Mental Health, Here’s How To Stay Sane And Healthy

Things That Matter

Working From Home Can Impact Your Mental Health, Here’s How To Stay Sane And Healthy

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A recent survey shows that thirty-five percent of workers who telecommute said their mental health had deteriorated as a result of doing so amid the coronavirus lockdown. As someone who has gone from working in a social, fun-filled, compassionate office space, I can consider myself part of that 35%.

Although working from home (for those privileged enough to do so) is a necessity for our safety and that of the community – it definitely presents some unique challenges.

Yes, the benefits are many: avoiding transit problems and the stress of commuting; sidestepping office politics; adopting a flexible schedule that allows for chores and errands to be incorporated into the work day; more time with family and pets; and a break on keeping up a business wardrobe and other appearance-related expenses.

But there’s a dark side. It’s an arrangement that fosters isolation and disconnection, two conditions that feed the greedy depression monster.

Here are some excellent tips for taking care of your mental health during these unprecedented times.

Break up your workday

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Some common challenges when working from home during the pandemic is the lack of stimulation and connection to people you used to see regularly. This can become a bit confusing, so it’s great to try to break up the schedule.

One of the best tips for working from home that I’ve discovered is breaking up the work day with movement. This can be a quick burst of movement (like jumping jacks, or lifting kettle bells) or some lower impact movement like a walk. I’m also a huge fan of taking a mid-afternoon break (longer than your typical 30-minute lunch break) to go on a long walk or run errands.

Get a routine and stick to it

Routine is essential, and it’s even more important when structure is missing.

Sticking to a routine does not mean that you have to abide by the old standard 9-5 office hours, and only take downtime in the evening. It simply means that you have a system for waking up on time, getting ready, feeling confident and getting your work done in a timely manner. 

When you do this regularly enough, it will feel more natural over time, and you won’t have to think about it so much. For me, this has meant taking my dogs out on a walk to get a coffee in the morning and then coming home and getting to work – it’s like creating my own little commute.

Stay connected

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Remember to keep up with friends and family, even if that can only be done through a Zoom or FaceTime call. Text someone you care about, and when restrictions are lifted in your area, try to make plans as regularly as you feel comfortable.

Connection is key, and it can be challenging when you don’t leave your home for long stretches of time.

It’s also helpful to join platforms of people doing similar work as you and interacting with them throughout the day. Or you can join an online book club or participate in volunteer work – having this sort of obligation will go a long way in helping you show up when you don’t feel great.

Incorporate wellness activities into your day

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One of the biggest perks of working from home is that you get to do things you might not be able to if you’re in an office all day.

I’ve been doing 20 minute walks around my neighborhood while listening to music. This moves the energy in the body and allow us to to have a shift in consciousness, which is so important when you’ve been isolated in front of a computer screen.

Another way to experience new energy in the body is to pause from work, find a comfortable place to sit, and then do deep belly breaths. This involves taking one deep breath in, and then focus on the exhale. You’ll notice your shoulders will relax, and your body will feel lighter.

Learn how to detach

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It’s so important when working from home that you keep your work and personal lives and actual physical areas totally separate. For many, it may not be possible to create an actual separate office space but you can create workspaces outside of your most “lived in” spaces. That’s what matters most.

There is a risk that working hours will get longer if the boundaries between work and personal life become blurred. It is necessary to establish a rigid system in which work can be carried out in a planned manner, such as by setting working hours and the timing of contact with supervisors.

No matter what you do, remember that working from home is yet another “new normal” to get used to — and the sooner you adapt to what makes you most productive, healthy, and mentally well, the better.