Things That Matter

Students At This High School Apparently Thought It Was OK To Drag A Black Mannequin By A Rope At Their Homecoming Game

Psychologists have said that the brain is not fully developed until the age of 25, which implies that people’s action before that age may be impaired of proper judgment. In other words, kids will be kids, right? However, some of the most absurd actions aren’t caused by kids, they also come from adults who should know better.

For some weird reason, both students and adults that work at school feel the need to act out for the worse during school hours. Remember the school staff that dressed up as the border wall? Or the other school staff that wore stereotypical Mexican costumes on their IDs? The racism continues. 

Students at Damonte Ranch High School in Reno, Nevada, used a black mannequin and dragged it with a rope during a homecoming game.

On Sept. 20, students Damonte Ranch High School changed up their homecoming routine without alleging informing school officials about what they planned to do. 

The initial gag would be that Damonte Ranch students would have a cowboy figure who would be lassoing a knight figure in order to represent their opposer that evening — McQueen High School — whose school colors are gray and blue. However, the students allegedly could not get a gray mannequin for the stunt, so they got a black mannequin instead. 

The report, from the school, states: “The class advisors approved a plan to purchase a blowup cowboy/horse and then lasso a student wearing knight armor and then stand on the float. According to the (redacted), it was later decided to purchase a blowup mannequin instead of dressing up a student. The (redacted) said (redacted) was unaware that there was a change in the original plan. The (redacted) tried to purchase a gray mannequin on Amazon, but the only one available was black. The students dressed a black blowup mannequin as a Lancer knight, using paper to show it’s armor, shield, helmet, and sword. The Blow up “Lancer Knight” was lassoed around the waist and was to be standing on the float during the float parade. According to the (redacted), they couldn’t keep the mannequin standing on the float and that’s why it ended up being dragged behind the student dressed in the blow up cowboy/horse.”

Just wow!

As soon as the stunt went down, showing the black mannequin being pulled by a rope, people were horrified as they witnessed it.

“Y’all don’t teach black history in our Reno Schools or something? I though y’all were better than that,” someone said on social media

Washoe County School District interim Superintendent Kristen McNeill said as soon she found out about the incident, she immediately launched an investigation 

“This is not who we are,” McNeill said in an interview with the Reno Gazette-Journal earlier this week. “It doesn’t represent Damonte or our district.” She added, “I get high school competition. This is not a friendly competition in my strong opinion.

According to the New York Post, Lonnie Feemster, president of the Reno-Sparks National Association for the Advancement of Colored People NAACP), went even further by saying, “It is troubling that children are so poorly educated that they did not immediately know that the hanging of a black doll is hurtful and frightening.”

The school has apologized for this offensive display of racism, which evokes how African-American people have been mistreated, abused, and killed, in U.S. history. 

“We completely understand how this was perceived and this could be offensive to anyone in attendance at the game,” a school official said in a statement to The New York Post. “This is a valuable learning experience and lifelong lesson for our Damonte Ranch students and staff.”

One thing the school could have perhaps done during this appalling display is put a stop to it as soon as it was happening. Isn’t there school staff at these events? Is that why there are chaperones to make sure students don’t act out in bad ways? Seems to us, these kids were running wild doing whatever they please during school events and on the school campus. 

READ: A San Diego High School Faces Controversy Over Yearbook Showing Teachers In Stereotypical Mexican Attire

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Disturbing Video Shows Workers Feeding White Kids First At A Georgia Daycare

Things That Matter

Disturbing Video Shows Workers Feeding White Kids First At A Georgia Daycare

Schools and daycares are supposed to be safe spaces for kids to be able to learn and to express themselves. However, we know that isn’t always the case. For years, children have had to fear gun violence on campus, bullying, and sexual assaults.

A recent video that’s gone viral shows that even younger kids aren’t safe from trauma, as a daycare in Georgia is being accused of blatant racism against its Black kids.

Young kids are experiencing hate and racism even at places meant to be safe for them.

The Kids ‘R’ Kids daycare center in Roswell, on the outskirts of Atlanta, has been accused of racism after a father checked in to the live feed at lunch time to see how his two-year-old son was doing and noticed that the white children were all fed first while the Black children were made to wait.

Adryan McCauley told CBS46: “They were skipping all of the Black kids it seemed like. All the white kids got their lunch, and all the Black kids had to wait. From the videos and pictures that we saw today, we are just completely disturbed.”

McCauley took a screenshot which he posted to Instagram, but the full video has not been released. He added that the boy’s mother asked the nursery what had happened and was reportedly told by the director: “I’m not really sure because I’m not in the classroom, maybe it’s a dietary thing.”

One of the families was sure to share what happened with the public.

According to the Daily Mail, the family of the 2-year-old posted the screenshot to Instagram, where it went viral.

“This is truly unbelievable. You better know this won’t be the last time you hear from me on this,” user @marquis_dagreat wrote, along with the screenshot. “Why does every white kid have their food? Not one black child has food in front of them! Thank God for cameras in classrooms because there is no way to hide this racism!”

“In the year 2021 this is truly unbelievable. As blacks we always strive to send our kids to schools in Suburban area’s [sic], but I’m telling you first hand that is not always best,” they continued. “This is not a black or white issue this is simply wrong!”

The brand behind the daycare has cut ties with the Georgia location.

The corporate office responded on Thursday by calling the screenshot “disturbing” and cutting ties with the location in question. 

“Our company has decided to terminate that franchisee’s Kids ‘R’ Kids contract and branding, effective immediately, leaving them to operate independently,” President and CEO David Vinson said in the statement, posted to Instagram. “We apologize to the family, the community and all of those impacted by this situation and will use this as a learning tool to remind our Kids ‘R’ Kids staff on the importance of diversity and inclusivity.”

Vinson added that the corporate office will help locate alternate preschool options for families displaced by the decision. 

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All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Entertainment

All The Things We Learned From Netflix’s New “Pelé” Documentary

Netflix continues to churn out powerful films in countries around the world and their latest venture, a look into the life of Brazilian footballer Pelé is another hit. Sure, Pelé may be considered the world’s best soccer player ever but his place in Brazilian history is less clear – at least according to the new doc.

Filmmakers David Tryhorn and Ben Nicholas spent hours in Pelé’s company interviewing him on everything from a childhood spent in poverty to his numerous affairs and his controversial relationship with the authoritarian regime that ruled Brazil during his playing career. Here are some of the key takeaways from this must watch documentary.

Pelé was criticized for not taking a political stance during Brazil’s authoritarian regime.

In 1964, the Brazilian military staged a coup, which led to a dictatorship being established in the country that lasted until 1985. The military government relied on torture and repression to maintain power.

In the film, Pelé is asked whether he knew about these practices at the time.

“If I were to say now that I had never been aware of it, that would be a lie,” he says. “There was a lot we never got to find out, but there were many stories too.”

However, the film paints him as taking a neutral stance throughout, never criticising the regime. Former team-mate Paulo Cezar Lima – aka Caju – doesn’t forgive him.

“I love Pele but that won’t stop me criticizing him. I thought his behavior was that of a black man who says ‘yes sir’,” said Caju. “A submissive black man. It’s a criticism I hold against him until this day, because just one statement from Pelé would have gone a long way.”

The government may have interfered with the Brazilian team.

A dejected Pele leaves the field at Goodison Park after being beaten 3-1 by Portugal, 1966.

The film paints a picture of how national team’s exploits were used to launder the reputation of the military regime during the 1960s. Before the 1970 World Cup, a journalist and friend of Pelé’s describes how it became very important for the regime’s international image that Brazil win the World Cup again. And that meant Pele had to play.

“Winning the World Cup became a governmental matter,” Kfouri says. “The team staff were almost entirely made up of military personnel.”

Manager Joao Saldanha appears to have been fired in the lead-up to the 1970 World Cup for criticizing the Brazilian president, telling a reporter: “I don’t pick his ministers and he doesn’t pick my team. That way we understand each other well.”

Pelé wanted to quit after the 1966 World Cup.

Credit: Pelé / Netflix

In the 1966 World Cup, Brazil was considered a favorite to win, having won the competition four years earlier in Chile. However, there was a massive shock when they were knocked out in the group stages.

“Getting knocked out of the World Cup in England was the saddest moment of my life,” Pelé says. In the film, he tells a reporter: “I don’t intend to play in any more World Cups, because I’m not lucky in them. This is the second World Cup where I have been injured after only two games.”

He played one more World Cup – the 1970 tournament in Mexico, which Brazil won. He’s still the only player to have won three World Cup trophies.

And he admits it was hard for him to stay faithful.

Stores of Pelé’s alleged infidelities and wild romances were common in the tabloids. By 1958, he was a global icon and football’s first millionaire while still only a teenager. And his fans followed him everywhere so it’s hardly a secret that Pelé did not show the same faithfulness to everyone in his life as he did to his club Santos.

At one point in the film, a journalist asks Pelé whether he found it difficult to remain faithful with the amount of women flirting with him.

“In all honesty, it was,” he says, “I’ve had a few affairs, some of which resulted in children, but I only learned about them later. My first wife knew all about it, I never lied to anyone.”

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