Things That Matter

A 100-Year-Old Man Survived Coronavirus And The Hospital Released Him In The Best Way Possible

The Coronavirus pandemic is serious. It’s killed hundreds of thousands and infected millions more. And in many places, including in the United States, it shows no signs of slowing down. But so often we only hear about the worst of the pandemic. We don’t get to hear about the slivers of hope and moments of celebration: including the story of a 100-year-old man who fought back the virus and was recently released from a Mexican hospital with a clean bill of health.

100-year-old Ignacio Cano was released from a Veracruz hospital after winning the battle against his Covid-19 infection.

Credit: @VeracruzIssste / Twitter

Ignacio Cano, or Don Nacho, was the oldest patient battling a Covid-19 infection to be admitted to the hospital. But thankfully, he’s also the oldest patient to be released after winning his fight against the virus.

The 100-year-old patient was admitted to the Speciality Hospital of Mexico’s public healthcare system (ISSSTE) in the Mexican state of Veracruz, with a diagnosis of Covid-19. Don Nacho spent more than 15 days under observation in the hospital and underwent several treatments for the virus.

In the state of Veracruz, 19,535 cases of the coronavirus have been reported, with 2,525 deaths. A total of 11 people between the ages of 32 and 80 years of age have recovered at the ISSSTE High Specialty Hospital of Veracruz.

His release was celebrated by hospital staff and local media.

As the oldest patient to recover from the virus, Don Nacho was met with a celebratory send off by hospital staff, who were understandably enthusiastic to see him being discharged. 

Raucous cheers, whistles and shouts of “Si, se puede!” by medical personnel greeted the centenarian as he was discharged from the hospital with a clean bill of health.

As Ignacio was being wheeled out of the hospital on a stretcher before being taken home by ambulance Sunday, his daughter, Maribel, thanked a doctor for his help in saving her 100-year-old father’s life.

Don Nacho’s release comes as grim news regarding the virus in Mexico makes headlines.

Credit: Humberto Pineda / Getty Images

Recent projections by Mexican health ofícialas say that the real number of Covid-19 cases in the country could be more than 17 times higher than official counts. That would put the potential number of cases at 7 million – greater than those in the U.S.

As of July 31, the official count of confirmed Coronavirus cases is 416,000 and 46,000 people have died from the virus. Due to a shockingly low test rate, many health experts believe that Mexico is vastly underestimating the widespread severity of the pandemic.

Despite this uncertainty, many parts of the country have started to return to a sense of ‘normalcy’ as bars, restaurants, and shopping centers begin to reopen. Even popular tourist destinations, such as Cancun and Puerto Vallarta, have reopened to tourism, including travelers from the Coronavirus-ravaged United States.

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RuPaul And Cory Booker Find Out They’re Cousins And The Internet Couldn’t Be Happier

Entertainment

RuPaul And Cory Booker Find Out They’re Cousins And The Internet Couldn’t Be Happier

RuPaul / Telepictures

For awhile now those DNA ancestry test things have been super popular among people, as many want to learn more about their family’s past. Which makes sense: so many of us want to feel a connection to our ancestors and know more about our roots.

Well, if you’re a celebrity there’s a show called Finding Your Roots that’s literally dedicated to helping explore the roots of America’s cultural icons. One of the show’s most recent guests was none other than America’s Drag Queen Superstar RuPaul.

In his episode, he discovered that he was related to a sitting U.S. senator and the pair are already hoping for a big family reunion sometime soon!

RuPaul and Sen. Cory Booker find out their family thanks to a TV show.

The PBS show Finding Your Roots has been around for several seasons now, as it follows celebrities as they discover their family ancestry. It’s full of cute and heartwarming moments and also apparently it’s making families out of celebs as well.

On this week’s episode, which featured glamazon RuPaul (along with fashion designers Diane von Furstenberg and Narciso Rodriguez), the guests were treated to a deep dive into their personal genetics. When analyzing Ru’s admixture results, Gates and his team discover that he and Sen. Cory Booker are DNA cousins.

It turns out that Booker was a guest on the series back in Season 1, so when analysts compared his DNA with RuPaul’s, they found that they shared a “long stretch of identical DNA” from Ru’s first chromosome.

When host Henry Louis Gates Jr. shares the news with Ru along with a picture of Booker, Ru replies, “He looks like my kin!” He then adds, “There’s a sweetness about him that I’ve always loved, and an intellect that is undeniable. Every time I’ve ever seen him he reminds me of my cousin Yula.”

The show is called Finding Your Roots and it’s pretty addictive to watch.

Credit: Amy Sussman / Getty Images

Educator Henry Louis Gates Jr. has returned with new episodes of Finding Your Roots, which is now in its sixth season. The host “continues his quest to get into the DNA of American culture” by examining celebrities’ DNA and educating them about their ancestral histories.

The show has helped explore the pasts of major celebs including Ava DuVernay and Justina Machado to Alejandro González Iñárritu And Sandra Cisneros.

Cory Booker wants the world to know that he is ‘very happy’ with the family ties to Queen Mama, RuPaul.

A few days after the episode aired, Sen. Cory Booker was a guest on The Wendy Williams Show and he exclaimed “Yes!” when Wendy Williams told him the news. He went on to say that he had “told everybody that would listen in my world” about the news.

“Since [the show] keeps the data of past people, he saw RuPaul and I have a very strong common DNA chain which demonstrates that we’re very close cousins,” he said.

“So yeah, my mom knows, I just, I love RuPaul, and I haven’t had a chance to talk to him since the news was revealed but I was very happy about that news and I hope that he and I can have a family reunion sometime.”

The two cousins have even met up before. Last year, Booker, who was running for the Democratic presidential nomination at the time, appeared on the drag icon’s talk show “RuPaul.”

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There’s A Mobile Día De Muertos Ofrenda Traveling Around Southern California To Commemorate Victims Of Covid-19

Things That Matter

There’s A Mobile Día De Muertos Ofrenda Traveling Around Southern California To Commemorate Victims Of Covid-19

Jan Sochor / Getty Images

Every year around this time, many Latino families setup their ofrendas and set out pictures and objects belonging to their lost loved ones – in celebration of Día de Muertos.

However, this year’s celebrations are looking very different thanks to the global Coronavirus pandemic.

Not only have many families recently lost loved ones to the virus, they’re also struggling with ways to pay for the often extravagant celebrations as so many are left without work and income. Others are too afraid to gather with their families for fear that they may spread the virus to others. Meanwhile, in some cities, cemeteries (where many of the celebrations take place) have been closed to the public to avoid further contagion risk.

So, to help bridge that divide some communities are finding new and creative ways to help celebrate their lost loved ones amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

A mobile ofrenda will visit some of LA’s neighborhoods most affected by the pandemic.

Día de Muertos takes on a special meaning this year as a deadly pandemic continues to disproportionately affect Latino communities. And although traditional celebrations and events have been canceled, Latino Health Access (a nonprofit that advocates for the health of the local Latino community) plans to bring the celebration to the homes of those most impacted by the virus in Orange County to honor the deceased.

“Many of the events have been canceled, but we still want to honor those people who have passed away this year because of COVID,” Karen Sarabia, program associate for the Latino Health Access COVID-19 response team, told the LA Times.

The group along with a few local artists are converting a 28-foot flatbed truck into the altar, much like a float in the Rose Parade. Residents will be able to take photos with the altar. They can also provide offerings or write down the names of their loved ones and place them on the altar to honor the deceased. 

Ofrendas like this one are a central part of Día de Muertos celebrations.

Credit: Jan Sochor / Getty Images

Giovanni Vazquez, a local artist from Anaheim helping to construct the altar, spoke to the LA Times about the significance of the Day of the Dead. 

“I think it’s important because … this is how we remember all the dead and how we also celebrate the living,” Vazquez said, “This is how we remember that we’re going to go too. No matter which pandemic, no matter what cause, we are also going to die too.”

He continued: “We would like to share the art and try to make people think that death is also colorful and something we can celebrate … Just being thankful that we met the people in our life, even though they have passed, we remember them.”

According to the group, the ofrenda will have the basic components of classical altars in Mexico, where the tradition of Día de Muertos originated. There will be candles, thousands of paper flowers, sugar skulls and many offerings. 

There will be a prominent large skull and several smaller skulls with butterfly wings. Vazquez said those represent “the sacred migration of the living.” Monarch butterflies, which migrate to Mexico in November, are important symbols of Day of the Dead. 

The ofrenda and campaign is more important than ever as Latinos and other minority communities continue to suffer the worst effects of the pandemic.

Latino Health Access is organizing the event as part of the Latino Health Equity Initiative. Orange County launched the program in June in partnership with Latino Health Access after data revealed that the Latino community, particularly in Anaheim and Santa Ana, has taken the brunt of the pandemic in Orange County. 

The Los Angeles Times reported in late September that while Latinos make up 39% of the state’s population, they account for 61% of the state’s cases and 49% of COVID-19 deaths.

Anaheim is 56% Latino and Santa Ana is 77%. The cities account for about 36% of the county’s COVID-19 cases. 

Through the initiative, Latino Health Access is offering testing, outreach, education and referral services. 

California is not alone as cities from El Paso to Chicago create their own Día de Muertos celebrations to commemorate Covid-19 victims.

Credit: Alfonso Castillo Orta / Mexican National Art Museum

At the Mexican National Art Museum in Chicago, the museum has launched it’s exhibit memorializing Latinos who have died of the virus. “Sólo un Poco Aquí: Day of the Dead” honors people who have died from COVID-19 in Chicago and globally, said Antonio Parazan, director of education at the museum.

The exhibit is “paying tribute and remembering … the numerous individuals from our community … during this terrible pandemic,” he said. 

“We’ve had some of the highest number of infections … and a high number of deaths, as well,” Parazan said, noting Latino neighborhoods in Chicago have been among the hardest hit by coronavirus.

Even in Mexico – which has been one of the world’s hardest hit countries – officials are thinking of ways to merge traditional Día de Muertos celebrations with remembrances of Covid-19 victims.

In the town of Xalapa, families are taking photos with a giant Catrina, which is one fo the most iconic symbols of the holiday. And in Mexico City, the cities annual parade is going digital and will feature a special commemoration for Covid-19 victims.

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