Things That Matter

7 Ways Latinos Go Above And Beyond To Be Eco-Friendly

A group of Latinos came together in Washington, D.C., recently for GreenLatinos, an event dedicated spreading awareness on environmental practices and causes. Many attendees talked about passing legislation to save the planet, and they agreed that Latinos are already eco-friendly af.

Here are some of the ways GreenLatino attendees claim Latinos go above and beyond in saving the planet.

1. There’s nothing like reusing your old clothes as cleaning rags.

CREDIT: mitú

“My mom used to have all of our t-shirts in a pile and she would sit there on Sundays and cut them up into little rags,” Greisa Martinez Rosas, the advocacy director of United We Dream says. “It wasn’t a green thing. It was more of a money thing.”

2. We will always reuse that butter container as Tupperware.

CREDIT: mitú

“At least in my house, they always told me to turn off the lights because it’s cheaper, so they’re low-key trying to save money,” Laura Di Lorenzo, mitú video producer and emcee at the GreenLatinos event. “They don’t even know they’re being green. They’re just being cheap. That’s something my parents did. They reuse ziplock bags and Tupperware. We recycle clothes. If I have a big cousin, I’ll inherent their clothes. Not that I want to, I’m just kind of forced into it.”

3. Your old clothes probably became a very uncomfortable pillow.

CREDIT: Calvin Klein / Giphy

“They usually turn out to be really hard and uncomfortable, but it’s a great way to recycle old shirts,” Rep. Jimmy Gomez of California’s 34th district says.

4. Some times you need to skip the towel after the shower.

CREDIT: That 70s Show / FOX

One Congressperson, who shall remain anonymous, admits that sometimes after a shower they skip the towel and dry off naturally. Not a bad idea if you want to conserve power and water.

5. We are experts in how long you can wear clothes before having to wash it.

CREDIT: Twin Peaks On Showtime / GIPHY

“I wait longer before I wash my clothes,” Rep. Nanette Diaz Barragán of California’s 44th district says. “I use it more before I have to go put it in the laundry and use detergent and more water. I don’t sweat very much so it’s probably easier to do that.”

6. We carpool like no other because there are a lot of us.

CREDIT: The Late Late Show with James Corden / CBS

“I have arranged for rides with friends that are heading into downtown,” Rep. Ruben Gallego of Arizona’s 7th district says. “Even though they couldn’t drop me off exactly at my spot, I would walk the last 5 blocks to get to my spot which is crazy in Phoenix to do that.”

7. We get every last bit of toothpaste out of the tube.

CREDIT: mitú

“We recycle some times out of need. We reuse the same bags. We use the same containers,” Henry Sanchez, chair of the National Hispanic Leadership Agenda and Executive Director of the Labor Council for Latin American Advancement (LCLAA), says.”We try to be very careful about using things like toothpaste to the fullest. It’s something that comes in our nature.”

To learn more about GreenLatinos, check out their website here.


READ: Our Parents Were Recycling Before It Even Existed

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Greta Thunberg Is Donating $114,000 To The Brazilian Amazon

Fierce

Greta Thunberg Is Donating $114,000 To The Brazilian Amazon

Leon Neal / Getty

Greta Thunberg’s activism has mobilized hundreds of thousands of people across the globe to make the world a better place. She first gripped the attention of people the world over when she began holding climate strikes and further captured awareness a year later when she was 16. At the time she condemned political leaders like Donald Trump and Boris Johnson in a speech for their part in the environmental crisis.

Now, even as the world seems to be on pause with the current pandemic, Thunberg is showing no signs of slowing down with her efforts

The teen climate activist announced that she will donate a portion of a $1.14 million prize she received to fighting the ongoing coronavirus crisis in the Brazilian Amazon.

Earlier this week, the teen activist won the very first Gulbenkian Prize for Humanity for her role in environmental activism. The prize was launched by Portugal’s Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation.

In a video posted to her Twitter account, Thunberg accepted the honor and said the winning prize was “more money than [she] can even begin to imagine.” The large amount inspired Thunberg to give the money away through her foundation. Thunberg says that she will give $114,000 to SOS Amazônia, an environmental organization that CNN says is “working to protect the rainforest that also works to fight the pandemic in indigenous territories of the Amazon through access to basic hygiene, food, and health equipment.”

Thunberg will also donate $114,000 to the Stop Ecocide Foundation.

The foundation works to make environmental destruction (or ecocide) a recognized international crime. Thunberg explained in her Twitter announcement that the rest of the prize money will be given to causes that “help people on the front lines affected by the climate crisis and ecological crisis especially in the global South.”

One hundred and thirty-six nominees from forty-six countries were considered for the prize that Thunberg was ultimately selected for.

The Chair of the Grand Jury Prize, Jorge Sampaio, explained in the announcement for the winner that Thunberg was selected for her effort to “mobilize younger generations for the cause of climate change.”

It’s not the first prize that Thunberg has won in recent months. Earlier in May she was honored with a $100,000 award for her activism and donated all of it to UNICEF “to protect children from the Covid-19 pandemic.” The award was given to her by Denmark’s Human Act foundation.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

This ULTA Employee Showed How Returned Products Are Handled And The Whole Thing Is Truly Eye-Opening

Fierce

This ULTA Employee Showed How Returned Products Are Handled And The Whole Thing Is Truly Eye-Opening

@biancaann5

No judgment but let’s be real. We’ve all been in the scenario where we’ve let loose at a makeup counter. You know, gone a little overboard with shopping, regretted a few purchases and then decided to take them back. Most stores like ULTA, Sephora, and Nordstrom have pretty great return policies when it comes to buyer’s remorse and so it never seems like too big of a deal when we show up the next day or even a few weeks later with our receipts and the items we no longer want.

But recently, an employee from ULTA revealed what happens after you’ve walked away from the return counter at a beauty supply store. And TBH it ain’t pretty.

Bianca Ann Levinson, who posts under @biancaann5 on TikTok, went viral after revealing how ULTA handles returns.

In the video posted to her TikTok, Levinson shows herself “damaging out” products of palettes and concealer tubes and dumping them into the trash. “This is what we have to do so that people don’t dumpster dive and steal it,” Bianca says in the video.

According to Levinson, her decision to post how the company handles returns wasn’t. mean to shame the company but shed light on returns to buyers.  “I don’t want people to come for Ulta and stop going at all. I want people to know that stores like Sephora, Bath and Body Works, Target, Walmart and many others all have to do the same, too,” Levinson explained to Buzzfeed in an interview.

At first glance, the process of damaging out is clearly extremely wasteful but it all chalks up to hygiene and scams.

As Levine points out in another TikTok, damaging out is done in the name of avoiding cross-contamination. Particularly in this time of the coronavirus pandemic. What’s more, Levine says the practice is done to avoid having dumpster divers try to sell products they find in the trash online. “If someone sells product out of the trash, it opens up the chance of someone getting sick or an infection and possibly suing Ulta,” Levine explained to Buzzfeed. “We can’t donate for the same reason. Most brands don’t allow it either. Ulta cares a lot about their customers and wants to do their best to keep them safe.”

“I wanted people to realize that when they return things, it’s not always put back on the shelf. They should reconsider before returning items they purchased. I understand some people have to return things, but if it’s not necessary, then I don’t believe they should return it,” she continued

Levine’s video has already accumulated over three million views. Clearly she’s taught us all a lesson. Hopefully, everyone does the right thing and puts the new lesson it into practice.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com