Things That Matter

A Haunted House Has Gone Viral For Its ‘Extreme Torture’ And People Want It Shut Down

A haunted house that lasts 10 hours has sparked public outcry with 63,000 people signing a petition to have it shut down. McKamey Manor is a massive estate that stretches across two states, Summertown Tennessee to Hunstville, Alabama. 

The attraction has garnered national interest because of its extreme conditions that require attendees to sign a 50-page waiver. The petition calls McKamey a “torture chamber” where patrons are subjected to cruel behaviors that allegedly include getting a tattoo or having fingernails pulled off. 

No one has ever completed the entire tour — the first winner has been promised a $20,000 reward by the owner Russ McKamey. 

“Not your typical ‘Boo’ Haunted House. You’ve been warned!”

The manor’s website provides a disclaimer to customers, “Not your typical ‘Boo’ Haunted House. You’ve been warned!” According to the website you can expect that actors will touch visitors however, visitors cannot touch the actors.  But this just the beginning of the nightmare. 

An employee, Kris Smith gave up on his first try after reading the waiver. In his second and third attempts, Smith quit after being buried alive in a coffin and then after having a panic attack during hypnotism. 

“I read it and I quit,” Smith told the Associated Press. “I got to the last page and turned around and went home…. There’s so much. You have to pull out your own teeth, there’s a chance of getting a tattoo, a chance of your fingernails getting pulled out. It’s really overwhelming. There’s a chance of death. Accidents do happen.” 

A petition accuses McKamey Manor of exploitation.

Change.org petition demands that Tennesee and Alabama state senates permanently close the manor’s doors. It claims it is a “torture chamber” that “uses loopholes to get out of being arrested.” 

“They do screenings to find the weakest, most easily manipulated people to do the ‘haunt’… McKamey Manor is a shame to all haunted houses, and needs to be shut down,” the petition reads. 

The petition founder, Frankie Towery says patrons are often waterboarded, forced to eat things, and have allegedly been injected with hallucinogenic drugs. 

“Some people have had to seek professional psychiatric help and medical care for extensive injuries. I propose that all locations where this is happening be shut down immediately,” the petition reads. 

Russ McKamey defends “torture chamber” haunted house. 

McKamey claims that because attendees are under hypnosis the things they tell authorities never really happened, it was all in their heads.

“When I use the hypnosis I can put you in a kitty pool with a couple inches of water and tell you there’s a great white shark in there, and you’re gonna think there’s a shark in there,” he said. “And so, when you have that kind of power over people, and have them do and see things that you want them to see, then they can leave here thinking it really happened, and they’ll go to the authorities and say, ‘oh, whatever,’ and I have to come back and show the footage and say, ‘it didn’t go that way at all.’ It’s saved me a thousand times.”

McKamey says he has never even tried alcohol, drugs, or cigarettes even once. He films all of the guests and uploads their humiliations onto YouTube for them to see. 

“You’d be surprised over the years how many people have claimed something happened to them inside,” McKamey told WFLA. “And I need to go back and show whoever needs to see it the raw and unedited footage, saying ‘here ya go, here’s the complete show.’

There is no swearing, drugs or alcohol allowed in the manor according to McKamey. 

“More of an inside little joke — that the manor is the most extreme haunt in the world but there’s no cussing involved,” he said. 

McKamey has strict health requirements for patrons. 

The haunted house also a comprehensive background check process and health warning.

“You must be in EXCELLENT HEALTH to participate in the EXTREME tour. You will incur VERY physically and mentally demanding environments. Make sure to follow the rules. YOU MUST READ the WARNING page and sign the WAIVER FORM before you enter the haunt,” the website reads. “DO NOT ATTEND if you have medical conditions that might cause you an injury… DO NOT enter our haunt if you are prone to seizures or if you have ANY kind of respiratory conditions, especially asthma, or heart conditions. Do not enter if you have broken bones, casts or are pregnant.”

A requirement of the haunted house is that all patrons be at least 21 and have a completed “sports physical” and clearance from doctors that they are both physically and mentally healthy. They must also have proof of medical insurance. 

The cost of admission to McKamey Manor is only a bag of dog food and possibly your sanity.

We Can’t Make This Stuff Up: A Startling Amount Of People Believe There’s A Link Between Corona (The Beer) And Coronavirus

Things That Matter

We Can’t Make This Stuff Up: A Startling Amount Of People Believe There’s A Link Between Corona (The Beer) And Coronavirus

We don’t mean to minimize the hardship that the newfound coronavirus has caused in China and the red alerts that the medical crisis has sparked all around the world. However, it is important to note how misinformation and Internet humor can lead to some people actually believing the most outlandish stories and explanations for the global health crisis.

Of course there have been conspiracy theories that claim that China was developing a biological weapon and things got out of control. This, of course has sparked all sorts of rumors, as is the case when global pandemics happen. But the fact remains that Chinese authorities have tracked the virus back to a market in Wuhan where exotic species and wild animals were being sold. It is believed that the virus, which is called “corona” because its shape resembles a crown, originated in a wild snake species and was then passed on to humans.

But of course for beer drinkers around the world the name reminded them of something else.

Credit: TopShelfRecords / Giphy

Yes, particularly for gringos the virus’ name had a particular resonance with the Mexican lager, renowned around the world for its crisp flavor and breezy palate. And also a reminder of many drunken nights or cruel hangovers. 

So, of course, the Internet being the Internet, memes relating the refreshing brew and the scary virus soon popped up everywhere!

Credit: Medium

So according to online chistes this is how the virus actually came about: with a compa having una chelita bien helada. If only this was true… 

Others just begged to be infected…

Credit: Stare Cat

.

… al mal paso darle prisa, they say. 

Others gave the memes a more geopolitical twist!

Credit: Stare Cat

It is no secret that U.S.-China relationships have deteriorated during the Trump administration and people soon got creative to throw political jabs at both sides. We wouldn’t be surprised, however, if some MAGA dudes actually believe something like this could actually be true. 

And of course where there is a Corona there is a lime… or lyme…?

Credit: Imgflip

Get it? Get it? Such a dad joke

The Mexican Internet has produced by far the best coronavirus related memes.

Credit: La Razón de Mexico

Just look at the estilacho on this compa, downing his chela with the aplomb of a true gentleman. 

And being “infected” became the best excuse for a drunken rampage

Credit: La Razón de Mexico

So if you get totally malacopa in a good old-fashioned borrachera, you can always blame the now celebre Corona-virus. 

But here’s the kicker… an increasing number of people actually believe there is a link between Corona beer and coronavirus! Yes, es neta!

Credit: El Imparcial

As Vice reported, Google search trends related to the virus obviously had an increase in the past few days as the disease spreads around the world and governments scramble to prevent populations from getting the disease that affects the upper respiratory tract, sometimes with fatal results. Searches such as “coronavirus symptoms” or “how do I prevent coronavirus” had a huge spike of 1050% in only a week.

However, the search trends also revealed a dark reality: people can be really ignorant when it comes to matters of public and personal health. As VICE reported, “there has also been a spike in searches for ‘corona beer virus,’ because apparently people are under the impression that coronavirus, also known as nCoV, has something to do with Corona brand beer.”

Some people claim that #fakenews doEs not actually cause any harm, but we beg to differ: people are ready and even willing to believe anything, particularly if it is just totally out of any scope of logic or common sense. 

And no, the searches do not originate in Mexico, where the beer is produced.

Credit: Picuki

The searches actually come from countries that are supposedly developed and whose citizens should definitely know better. VICE further reports: “The searches have been prevalent in North America (but not in Mexico, where the beer is produced) and western Europe (we see you, Finland), as well as in Australia, India, Indonesia, Japan, and New Zealand.” Just wow!

And it gets even worse. Far-right conspiracy theorists actually say that the best way to prevent the virus is by drinking bleach, as Daily Beast reports: “the conspiracy purveyors at QAnon are suggesting that the best way to protect yourself from coronavirus is by drinking bleach. In both tweets and videos, QAnon associates have suggested that their followers should purchase and consume a product called Miracle Mineral Solution, Miracle Mineral Supplement, or simply MMS.”

Just what is wrong with people?

Cheetos Released The Official Name For The Cheesy Dust Left On Your Fingers And Some People Seriously Hate It

Culture

Cheetos Released The Official Name For The Cheesy Dust Left On Your Fingers And Some People Seriously Hate It

Pixabay

Frito-Lay has declared the cheesy residue left on your fingertips after eating Cheetos is called “cheetle.” Don Cheadle might be feeling some type of way right now. The press release has caused some confusion on social media with many Twitter users refusing to accept that this is the correct terminology and questioning its origins.  

To blow matters perhaps even more out of proportion, actor Ed Helms claims a comedian came up with the word “cheedle” in the 1980s. Some users even pointed out that the term was added to Urban Dictionary in 2005. 

Frito-Lay declares Cheetos dust “Cheetle” in official press release.

“We’ve seen the way Cheetos lovers don their red- and orange-dusted fingers like a badge of honor, and we’re always looking for ways to help them step up their snacking game,” Brandi Ray, senior director of marketing, Frito-Lay North America said in a press release. “The only way to truly take popcorn to the next level is to add the iconic Cheetle, the cheesy dust that will entice Cheetos fans to snack on this popcorn all year long.”

The move to bring Cheetle into the popular lexicon comes as Frito-Lay announces new Cheetos popcorn. The snack is popcorn with Cheetle as a topping in two flavors including Cheddar and Flamin’ Hot. 

“Snacking on Cheetos has become a special experience for many fans, including the experience of having the iconic cheese dust left on your fingers,” Rachel Ferdinando, senior vice president and chief marketing officer of Frito-Lay North America, told TODAY. “We (Frito-Lay executives) have long called that red and orange cheese dust ‘Cheetle,’ but it became clear from our fans the special interest they had, so we knew it was time to share our beloved name for this magic ingredient.”

Where did the term “Cheetle” come from? What is the truth? 

Ferdinando claims that Frito-Lay trademarked the term in 2005. An earlier form of the word was spelled “cheedle.” A 2005 entry in Urban Dictionary defines cheetle as, “the orange, powdery residue left on your fingers after eating Cheetos.” Perhaps, a Frito-Lay employee submitted it? 

“Frito-Lay officially trademarked ‘Cheetle’ in 2005, but the company hasn’t used (it) externally in much capacity until now and haven’t told consumers about it,” Ferdinando said. 

However, the Hangover actor Ed Helms believes the term was invented by Saturday Night Live alumni Rich Hall, who coined “cheedle” in his book sniglets

“An earlier form of Cheetle, spelled cheedle, was found to be one of the sniglets (fun coinages) of comedian Rich Hall in the 1980s, which he defined as ‘the residue left on one’s fingertips after consuming a bag of Cheetos.’ The first known proper use of Cheetle, as such, was found in a finger-painting online computer game as early as 2004 and 2005, after which the name was first popularly defined on Urban Dictionary,” according to Dictionary.com.

Many Twitter users did not know how to feel about Cheetle. 

As can only be expected there were many Don Cheadle jokes, but perhaps the best was the one that differentiated between Don Cheetle (the orange-tanned Donald Trump) and Don Cheadle (the Golden Globe-winning actor). 

Some on Twitter wanted to keep things simple.

Other users were just not feeling the name. Why call Cheetos dust “cheetle” when you can call it “Cheetos dust”?

“I love you Cheetos, but no. It’s Cheeto Dust, end of story. In no world am I ever gonna say I have Cheetle on my fingers, WTF,” one user wrote. 

Helms wasn’t the only one on social media upset that Rich Hall wasn’t getting his due credit. 

“So @Cheetos thinks they have come up with the perfect name of the dusty cheesy residue left on your fingers… Sorry, the name Cheetle was used by Rich Hall on NNTN as one of his @SnigletsOFC back in the ’80s,” another user wrote. 

The future is still unwritten, who knows if the term “cheetle” will ever catch on? Personally, I don’t converse about Cheetos enough for it to ever come up casually. Nevertheless, Frito-Lay’s branding effort clearly worked: we’re all talking about cheetle today.