Things That Matter

Here Are 23 Feminista Instagram Accounts To Keep You Going

As of 2015, Latinxs make up over 17 percent of the U.S., but only make up 5.8 percent of the characters we see on TV. It’s 2018 now and while we wait for more Guillermo Diaz to get us to Thursday night’s “Scandal”, we’ll be on Instagram, where the popular vote actually counts. #democracy

Here’s our roundup for the Latinxs who are saying the things we can’t find words for, creating art that speaks our language, and who inspire us to keep taking up space in this world. I mean, we *are* the best thing that’s happened to Instagram, clearly.

1. Sofia Vergara

CREDIT: @sofiavergara / Instagram

Sofia Vergara co-founded a business called Empowered By You that gives 10 percent of sales back into a micro-financing loan programs specifically for women. What’s the business? It’s women’s underwear. Bless you, Sofia.

2. @theunapologeticallybrownseries

CREDIT: @theunapologeticallybrownseries / Instagram

Johanna Toruño created @theunapologeticallybrownseries when she was sitting in her bathtub in New York City. She was feeling frustrated and isolated after moving from El Salvador. Her art is influenced by the political street art that engulfed her childhood during the civil war.

3. Selena Gomez

CREDIT: @selenagomez / Instagram

Gomez has faced sexism and racism in the industry, from radio interviews to straight trolling on social media. But she doesn’t back down, and speaks up for lupus awareness, suicide prevention and Dreamers.

4. @latinarebels

CREDIT: @latinarebels / Instagram

Bio: “5 Latinas unveiling the complexities of Latina embodiment. Spreading knowledge 1 meme at a time.” We’re here for your memes that break hearts and wake us all up to action. #bowdown

5. Prisca Dorcas Mojica Rodriguez

CREDIT: @priscadorcas / Instagram

She’s the founder of ‘Latina Rebels’ and she’ll add the dose of realness to your Intagram feed that you need. When Rodriguez gives speeches, she refuses to stand behind a podium “because podiums have been used by [mostly] white politicians and preachers to spew hateful rhetoric towards women, LGBQI+ folks, and excused the destruction and exploitation of the global south – so fuck the podiums.”

6. @bad_dominicana

CREDIT: @bad_dominicana / Instagram

She’s bad but she’s so, so good. Her art collections are titled things like, “BLACK GIRLS LAYING DOWN, NOT GIVING A FUCK BOUT U Collection”. You can buy her prints at ShopZahiraKelly.com or get her work and words in your feed.

7. Dior Vargas

CREDIT: @dior_vargas / Instagram

Mental health has become a nationwide crisis, and one of the best things we can do to combat it is to talk about it. If you’re Latinx, your mom probably also just force-fed you chocolate to resolve your “depression.” Dior Vargas fights to remove the stigma in communities of color with her People of Color & Mental Illness Photo Project.

8. @dominicanbrujaprincess

CREDIT: @dominicanbrujaprincess / Instagram

Una “vigilante residing in Nueva York,” she brings bright, Dominican street art colors straight to your phone. Our bodies take up space, and I feel a thousand times more fabulous seeing a semblance of mine surrounded by agua de coco. TY, @dominicanprincessbruja. 

9. Demi Lovato

CREDIT: @ddlovato / Instagram

Lovato is vegana, speaks up for shelter dogs and is bae. Plus, she just released a Spanish version of ‘Tell Me You Love Me’ on Spotify and I’m ready to snuggle a pup while I listen.

10. Favianna Rodriguez

CREDIT: @favianna1 / Instagram

Rodriguez’ artwork is dedicated to immigrant rights, womanhood, queerness, and sexuality. Her art, like most art, is a revolution and a bold political statement. See beauty that lights up dark places here.

11. Zuly de la Rose

CREDIT: @zulydelarose / Instagram

An “artivist”, feminist and just badass advocate to break out of heteronormative constrictive roles, De La Rose is creating the space all of us need. The beauty of feminism, imo, is that it creates space for every other gender besides just the one cisgender male. We’re all beautiful and worthy of basic dignity and De La Rose makes it oh so obvious.

12. Janel Martinez

CREDIT: @janelm / Instagram

Creator of “Ain’t I Latina?”, Janel speaks through her journalism and with media companies about the role of colorism in the Latinx community and beyond. She has a lot of good and necessary things to say, so listen up.

13. Juliana Pache

CREDIT: @thecityofjules / Instagram

You might have heard of Pache back in February 2016 when she coined the hashtag heard around the world: #BlackLatinxHistory. @thecityofjules will light your feed up with her favorite Afro-Latinxs stories. We all need her.

14. Kat Lazo

CREDIT: @itskatlazo / Instagram

Our very own mitú Video Producer, Kat Lazo, is Peruana, Columbiana y feminista y orgullosa. She’s using her YouTube fame to let everyone know what’s up and dismantling myths and the patriarchy one video at a time. #TheKatKall

15. @xicanisma_

CREDIT: @xicanisma_ / Instagram

If you aren’t listening to a podcast right now, you *must* listen to Xicanisma. At the very least, follow to see what’s not making your news, including gentrification, and social justice issues around the globe.

16. @QueerXicanoChisme

CREDIT: @queerxicanochisme / Instagram

Rubén is Xicano, but doesn’t fuck with Mexico-centrism and is all about inclusivity. he is quick to use his social media reach and platform to seek social justice in times of crisis. Follow him.

17. @bitterbrownfemmes

CREDIT: @bitterbrownfemmes / Instagram

Cohosted by @xicanisma_ and @queerxicanochisme, this ‘gram gives us the memes and stories we need. Thank you for keeping us all accountable. ? They need your support, so check them out!

18. Eiza Gonzalez

CREDIT: @eizagonzalez / Instagram

Ok, it’s not hard for Gonzalez to redefine beauty standards because she’s, well, a drop-dead gorgeous model. She dedicates her platform to “todas las mujeres Mexicanas” who have helped inspire her to rep México in everything she does. We ❤ you!

19. Melissa Lozada-Olivia

CREDIT: @ellomelissa / Instagram

@ellomelissa is an artist, spoken word poet and author. Her posts are raw elements of her day and fan art of her poetry, like this “Ode to Brown Girls With Bangs”. This is one feminista you don’t want to miss.

20. @feministailustrada

CREDIT: @feministailustrada / Instagram

The machísmo is real in the Latinx communities and @feministailustrada is speaking our language… in our language. These feel like things you should be sharing with your bro primos.

21. @revolucionfeminista_

CREDIT: @revolucionfeminista_ / Instagram

“No habrá revolución sin evolución de conciencias. ♀” Recording the revolution around the globe. Be part of it. 

22. Cristal Gutiérrez

CREDIT: @cris8acupcake / Instagram

She’s a Xicana illustrator of all things feminista, immigrant rights and more. Plus, she sells these amazing Frida stickers!

23. Amanda Alcantara

CREDIT: @yosoy_amanda / Instagram

Amanda self-describes herself as an “unapologetic Caribbean Palabrera living in Spanglish” on all our IG feeds. She co-founded La Galería magazine and is the Digital Media Editor for Latino USA. What I love about following Amanda is that she gets vulnerable. Caption: “#tbt One year ago today I cut my hair at home at 2am because I didn’t want it to no longer define me, cuz I wanted to fight beauty standards and because I wanted to stop hiding my face.”

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Radical Feminists Have Seized Control of a Federal Building in Mexico in Protest of the Government’s Apathy Towards Rampant Femicide

Entertainment

Radical Feminists Have Seized Control of a Federal Building in Mexico in Protest of the Government’s Apathy Towards Rampant Femicide

Last week, Mexican feminist activists took over the National Human Rights Commissions federal building in a move to bring greater awareness to the scourge of gender-based violence and femicide that has racked Mexico for decades.

According to the federal Interior Secretariat, the statistics in Mexico have recently taken a turn for the worse.

Domestic violence against women has became an even more acute problem since the pandemic has forced women to stay insider with their abusers. Emergency distress calls reporting domestic violence have risen by 50%.

The occupation of the Human Rights building is just another chapter in the saga of the “Ni Una Menos” (Not One More Woman) movement, an anti-femicide collective born in Argentina that has steadily been gaining steam in Mexico since 2019.

In recent years, anti-femicide demonstrations have been sparked by various heinous crimes against women or girls that have been largely overlooked by law enforcement officials. 

Photo by Marcos Brindicci/Getty Images

Unfortunately, the government of Mexico has appeared to be apathetic to the wave of femicide that is overwhelming the women of their country.

Recently, when President Andrés Manuel López Obrador was asked to address Mexico’s gender violence epidemic, he demurred, stating that he didn’t “want femicide to detract” from the raffle his administration was holding for the sale of the presidential airplane.

As for the feminist activists at the heart of Ni Una Menos and the federal building occupation, the government’s failure to respond to anti-woman violence is the primary fuel for their anger. 

“We’re here so that the whole world will know that in Mexico they kill women and nobody does anything about it,” said Yesenia Zamudio to the LA Times. According to Zamudio, she is still seeking justice for the murder of her 19-year-old daughter four years ago.

The women of Mexico appear to be fed up, grasping at any and all tactics that have the potential to incite change on a grander scale.

Their tactics may seem dramatic to some, but it’s undeniable that they are no longer being ignored. As of now, the radical activists are pulling attention-grabbing stunts like decorating a portrait of Mexican Revolution leader Francisco Madero with lipstick and purple hair.

They’re also making headlines for vandalizing the federal building’s walls and splashing paint on the doors of the presidential palace.

One thing is for sure: something has to change. Otherwise, thousands of innocent women and girls will continue to be raped, abused, and murdered while their perpetrators escape with immunity. 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Joe Biden Speaks Alongside ‘Fearless Fighter’ Kamala Harris In First Appearance And Recalls Her Family’s Immigrant Story

Fierce

Joe Biden Speaks Alongside ‘Fearless Fighter’ Kamala Harris In First Appearance And Recalls Her Family’s Immigrant Story

Chip Somodevilla / Gettycc

After weeks of speculation and anticipation, presidential candidate Joe Biden announced on Tuesday that he has officially picked his running mate.

In a history-making announcement, Biden revealed that he had tapped California Sen. Kamala Harris to be his VP Pick.

“I have the great honor to announce that I’ve picked @KamalaHarris — a fearless fighter for the little guy, and one of the country’s finest public servants — as my running mate,” Biden announced in a tweet.

On Wednesday, Biden held his first campaign event alongside running mate Kamala Harris in Delaware.

During their speeches, the two candidates wore masks and kept their distance in keeping with COVID-19 standards.

Speaking about his VP pick, Biden described Harris as coming from an “America’s story.” Biden described Harris as “a child of immigrants” who “knows personally how immigrant families enrich our country as well as the challenges of what it means to grow up Black and Indian-American in the United States of America,” he explained. “And this morning, all across the nation, little girls woke up, especially little Black and brown girls that feel overlooked and undervalued in their communities, but today — today just maybe they’re seeing themselves for the first time in a new way as president and vice presidents.”

In a speech of her own, Harris emphasized the importance of family and urged citizens to vote.  “We need a mandate that proves that the past few years do not represent who we are or who we aspire to be,” she said. “Joe likes to say that character is on the ballot. And it’s true,” she explained. “I’ve had a lot of titles over my career and certainly vice president will be great. But ‘Momala’ will always be the one that means the most.”

Harris’s nomination makes her the first Black and first Indian-American woman on either major party’s presidential ticket.

Harris is a former prosecutor from California who challenged Biden in her own presidential bid last year. Her nomination makes her the fourth woman to appear on a major presidential ballot. Before her, Geraldine Ferraro ran as a Democratic vice presidential nominee in 1984. In 2008, Republican Sarah Palin ran as a vice presidential nominee, later in 2016, Hillary Clinton became the Democratic presidential nominee.

Biden’s choice was one that has long been in the works. In March of this year, he revealed that he would make a point to have a woman as his running mate and in July he announced that he had narrowed his picks down to four Black women.

Kamala Harris was elected to Congress in 2016.

This has been Harris’ first term as a senator. Before, she served as the California attorney general. During her time as AG, Harris formed a lasting friendship with Biden’s late son Beau who was attorney general at the time in Delaware. Writing about Beau’s death, in her memoir The Truths We Hold, Harris recalled that “there were periods when I was taking the heat when Beau and I talked every day, sometimes multiple times a day,” she wrote in her memoir. “We had each other’s backs.”

Biden’s son Beau died in 2015 from brain cancer. Harris attended his funeral.

During his announcement, Biden mentioned Harris’ friendship with his son.

“I watched as they took on the big banks, lifted up working people, and protected women and kids from abuse,” Biden tweeted. “I was proud then, and I’m proud now to have her as my partner in this campaign.”

So far, it seems there are quite a bit of Harris x Biden supporters.

Fans were quick to give their support and applaud her candidacy.

In a tweet acknowledging her nomination, Harris wrote “@JoeBiden can unify the American people because he’s spent his life fighting for us. And as president, he’ll build an America that lives up to our ideals. I’m honored to join him as our party’s nominee for Vice President, and do what it takes to make him our Commander-in-Chief.”

Here’s to 2020 y’all. Get ready to make history.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com