Things That Matter

21 Shots of Latin America That Left Us in Awe

You don’t need us to tell you, Latin America’s dripping in spellbinding scenery and boasts a rich culture and history. In light of this, we’ve collated 21 stunning images that portray South America in all its glory. From rolling valleys to urban skylines, we’ve covered it all. Let’s dive in!

1. Rio at Sunset

Credit: Rio. Digital Image. Pixabay, ujasnpandya. Jan. 27, 2015

This snap doesn’t need a description. The natural beauty here does all the talking. From the impeccable sunset over the mountains to the dreamy harbor- this shot captures some of the best features of Rio de Janeiro.

2. Cows in Rural Paraguay

Credit: Nature. Digital Image. Pxhere. Dec. 31, 2016

The mountainous landforms in Paraguay not only look sublime, but they’re the perfect place for herds of cattle to roam. Ethical farming amidst stunning scenery- what could be better?

3. Morning Brakes in Guatemala

Credit: Dawn. Digital Image. Pixabay marcoreyes. May. 25, 2015

Waking up at dawn and walking through the streets of Guatemala is one of the most peaceful experiences you’re ever likely to have. If you haven’t done it yet, put it on your bucket list.  For what this country lacks in size it more than makes up for in culture. Paraguay’s intriguing history coupled with its natural beauty creates a land full of breathtaking sites and photo ops.

4. Christ the Redeemer

Credit: Rio. Digital Image. Pixabay, fabiowanderley. July 26, 2016

We couldn’t compile a list of stunning Latin American images without including this magnificent structure! The colossal statue of Christ has proudly stood for 87 years at the summit of Mount Corcovado. This landmark’s one of Rio’s most internationally recognized hotspots. No one can visit this stature without being in utter awe of it

5. A Chilean Night’s Sky

Credit: Space. Digital Image. Pixabay, CristinaLaFee. Aug. 18, 2017

Have you ever seen a starry night’s sky as mesmerizing as this? On a clear evening, you can see dozens of twinkling stars. There’s so many dotted around you’ll struggle to count them all! Could you imagine anything more idyllic than setting up a hammock and sleeping here, under a sky as gorgeous as this?

6. Cycling in Paraguay

Credit:  Tree. Digital Image. Pxhere. 3 July. 2017

This snap captures an inkling of Latin American culture and tradition. This man’s working hard, transporting grass through the streets of Paraguay on the back of his bike.

7. Lima: A Dreamy Peruvian Coastline

Credit: Lima. Digital Image. Pixabay, ygrrr. Oct. 25, 2014

This image encompasses a gorgeous blend of cosmopolitanism and scenic coastal views. Lima truly has something for everyone to enjoy! Take a stroll down Miraflores boardwalk and explore all the nearby streets and parks. Lose yourself amidst the beautiful lanes lining the shore. It’s the perfect way to spend a laid-back afternoon.

8. Traditional Puerto Rican Architecture

Credit: Puerto Rico. Digital Image. Pixabay, sjdents. Nov. 10, 2014

Latin American culture’s full of color, creativity, and vibrancy- so it’s not surprising Puerto Rico’s architecture reflects these traits. The choice of bold paint is a treat for the eyes. The best word to describe the overall aesthetic is: ‘divine.’

9. A Long Peruvian Road

Credit: Peru. Digital Image. Pixabay, al3xitox100pre. Dec. 8, 2016

What could be better than jumping in a car and heading out on a road trip through the mysterious mountains of Peru? This image makes you want to pack up your bags and go on the adventure of a lifetime.

10. Glaciers in Argentina

Credit: Glacier. Digital Image. Pixabay, derwiki. Dec. 30, 2014

To the southwest of Argentina, there are more than 300 glaciers. Some are as large as 217-miles long in the Parque Nacional Los Glaciares.

11. Ipanema Beach

Credit: Ipanema Beach. Digital Image. Pixabay, eacuna. Dec. 21, 2012

Situated towards the South of Rio de Janeiro, this beach is famous for its breathtaking sunsets and natural beauty. People flock from all around the globe to visit this place- judging from the picture; we’re sure you can see why!

12. Colors of Peru

Credit: Substances. Digital Image. Pixabay, LoggaWiggler. Aug. 17, 2011

Peruvian fabrics are famous for their bold use of color- it’s hard not to smile when you see a market stall brimming with hues as bright as these. After all, they say variety’s the spice of life- so, why shouldn’t this apply to color-filled fashion.

13. Machu Picchu In All Its Glory

Credit: Machu Picchu. Digital Image. Pixabay, skeeze. Aug. 5, 2016

Behold, Machu Picchu. As you probably already know, this is the Incan citadel that sits proudly amidst the Andes Mountains. The structures were expertly crafted back in the 15th century and later abandoned. The best thing about this mysterious place is that no one’s 100% sure what the remains were used for by the Incas- eerie!

14. Colombian Street Art

Credit: Face. Digital Image. Pixabay, lanur. Aug. 23, 2014

The street art in Colombia is astounding. Take a walk through Bogotá, and marvel at the world-renown graffiti that’s captured the hearts and imaginations of art-lovers from around the world. The quality and the diversity of the work plastered across the walls is second to none.

15. Tango Like No One’s Watching

Credit: Tango. Digital Image. Pixabay, pinthemapproject. Sept. 14, 2015

Check out this stunning couple as they enjoy dancing the Tango in the streets of Buenos Aires, Argentina. Can you think of anything more romantic?

16. Penguin Colony in Argentina

Credit: South America. Digital Image. Pixabay, magicaltravelling. Feb. 24, 2016

Everyone loves penguins, and Argentina is home to four beautiful species. The colony pictured above is nothing short of majestic.

17. Rainbow Mountain

Credit: Peru. Digital Image. Pixabay, jerzykwpodrozy. March 29, 2017

This beautiful Peruvian mountain looks as though it’s painted in stunning golds, emeralds, reds, and violets. Once upon a time, this mountain was covered in ice. As it began to melt, the water combined with the minerals in the rocks and created the colors you see here- how neat is that?

18. Chilean Shanty Town

Credit: Landscape. Digital Image. Pxhere. 03/04 2017

This photo’s living proof that money isn’t everything. These Chilean slums exude color right across the Valparaíso coastline. As you can imagine, the skyline’s mesmerizing!

19. Ecuadorian Llamas

Credit: Landscape. Digital Image. Pxhere. 4th April 2017

These Ecuadorian llamas are gorgeous. It looks like the one in the brown fur’s gazing out across the lake- and who can blame him? The mountainous landscape set behind the blue body of water looks idyllic.

20. Peruvian Dress

Credit: Architecture. Digital Image. Pxhere. 3rd July 2017

These Quechuan ladies are proudly sporting traditional Peruvian dress. Living high within the Andes, this community farms wool to produce beautiful handicrafts.

21. Traveling in Paraguay

Credit: Tree. Digital Image. Pxhere. 3rd Dec. 2017

This snapshot provides another quick insight into the traditional culture of Paraguay. This man’s elegantly riding a cart pulled by cattle. A mode of transport that’s better known as an oxcart. Initially, oxcarts were used in Costa Rica during the mid-nineteenth century to transport coffee beans. Although they’re rarer in today’s society, they remain a beautiful symbol of Latin American history.

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Culture

People Have A Lot Of Opinions About The Argentina Episode Of Netflix’s ‘Street Food: Latin America’

Manuel Velasquez / Getty Images

Netflix has a new food show out and it has everyone buzzing. “Street Food: Latin America” is bringing everyone the sabor of Latin America to their living room. However, reviews are mixed because of Argentina and the lack of Central American representation.

Netflix has a new show and it is all about Latin American street food.

Some of the best food in the world comes from Latin America. That is just a fact and it isn’t because our families and community come for Latin America. Okay, maybe just a little. The food of Latin America comes with history and stories that have shaped our childhood. For many of us, it is the only thing we have that connects us to the lands our families have left.

The show is highlighting the contributions of women to street food.

“Street Food: Latin America” focuses mainly on the women that are leading the street food cultures in different countries in Latin America. For some of them, it was a chance to bring themselves out of poverty and care for their children. For others, it was a rebellion against the male-dominated culture of cooking in Latin America.

However, some people have some strong opinions about the show and they aren’t good.

There is a lot of attention to native communities in the Latino community culturally right now. The Argentina episode where someone claims that Argentina is more European is rubbing people the wrong way right now. While the native population of Argentina is small, it is still important to highlight and honor native communities who are indigenous to the lands.

The disregard for the indigenous community is upsetting because indigenous Argentinians are fighting for their lives and land.

An A Jazeera report focused on an indigenous community in northern Argentina who were fighting to protect their land. After decades of discrimination and humiliation, members of the Wichi community fought to protect their land from the Argentinian government grabbing it in 2017. Early this year, before Covid, children of the tribe started to die at alarming rates of malnutrition.

Another pain point in the Latino community is the complete disregard of Central America.

Central America includes Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Belize, and Panama. Central America’s exclusion is not sitting right with Netflix users with Central American heritage. Like, how can five whole countries be looked over during a Netflix show about street food in Latin America?

Seems like there is a chance for Netflix to revisit Latin America for more food content.

There are so many countries in Latin America that offer delicious foods to the world. There is more to Latin America than Brazil, Mexico, Peru, Argentina, Colombia, and Bolivia.

READ: This Iconic Mexican Food Won The Twitter Battle To Be Named Latin America’s Best Street Food

Desperate For Work, Immigrant Workers Are Collecting The Bodies Of Covid-19 Victims

Things That Matter

Desperate For Work, Immigrant Workers Are Collecting The Bodies Of Covid-19 Victims

Hector Vivas / Getty Images

Countries across Latin America are struggling to combat the Coronavirus pandemic. In fact, Latin America is now considered the epicenter of the global outbreak, as countries in the region are ravaged by the virus. From Brazil to Mexico, government responses have varied widely and adherence to social distancing guidelines has been difficult for communities with little in the way of a financial safety net.

Meanwhile, Latin America is still experiencing a refugee crisis as Venezuelans flee their country for better opportunities in Colombia, Peru, Brazil, and even Mexico. This has led to many migrants being forced to take less than ideal jobs as ordinary work opportunity have dried up as the economies have been hit hard by the pandemic.

In Peru, migrants are collecting bodies of those who have died from Covid-19 in order to make a living.

Despite Peru’s early action to contain the pandemic, the coronavirus has spread like wildfire through the country. More than 390,000 people have been diagnosed with the virus so far. Meanwhile, the country is a destination for Venezuelan refugees, with at least 870,000 who have ended up in Peru, working low-wage jobs to make ends meet or to send funds home to impoverished loved ones.

One of the jobs these migrants are working is to collect the bodies of those who have died from Covid-19. It’s a grim job but they earn $500 a month for their efforts, nearly double the minimum wage in Peru. They work up to 19 hours a day, seven days a week.

Most of the bodies they collect are from poor neighborhoods, from homes where people can’t afford to hire a funeral director to handle the burial. There have been more than 13,000 deaths from Covid-19, and the public health system is collapsing under the weight of the grim toll. What’s left for the poor is a death with little dignity.

At the city’s El Angel Cemetery crematorium, many of the staff handling bodies also are Venezuelans.

“The Peruvians don’t do it. It’s tough,” said Orlando Arteaga, who works seven days a week, earning the money he needs to support three children in Venezuela and a 2-year-old daughter in Lima. He told CNN he never imagined he would see so much death, but that “somebody has to do it — and we need work.”

Peru has been hit hard by the outbreak and its death toll continues to rise.

As of July 28, Peru has seen more than 390,000 confirmed cases of Covid-19 and there have been 18,418 deaths related to the virus. These numbers have skyrocketed in recent weeks. In fact, at the beginning of the crisis, Peru appeared as a model for other countries in the region.

Peru was praised early on in the pandemic for its swift and decisive response, buffered by an enviable fiscal cushion. But four months later, the government’s disjointed execution of its strategy has made the country a cautionary tale for how not to fight Covid-19. Early on, Peru’s government imposed a strict lockdown that is only now being eased. A few days later, a fiscal package of more than 10% of GDP was announced, including cash transfers to the poorest third of the population, credit support for businesses and, most importantly, expanded funding to the health sector.

And yet, Peru’s record on dealing with the pandemic has not only been disappointing – it is among the worst in the world.

Venezuelan refugees have been pouring out of the country looking for better opportunities and ways to support their families.

Although Venezuela hasn’t been hit hard by the Coronavirus, compared to other countries – although this is beginning to change. However, it’s experiencing an economic catastrophe that has left millions in extreme poverty.

The country has recorded almost 16,000 cases of Covid-19 and less than 150 deaths. But the country is being ravaged by fuel and electricity shortages, a near worthless currency, and political strife that has rendered much of the government useless.

Countries in the region are being dramatically affected by the fallout. Neighboring Colombia, for instance, has absorbed some 1.6 million Venezuelan refugees to date in a migration wave that is severely straining government resources and adversely impacting the national economy. Peru has experienced much the same dynamic, as — to a lesser extent — have countries like Ecuador, Brazil and Chile. That’s because eight out of ten Venezuelan refugees have remained in Latin America and the Caribbean, so local governments have been forced to bear the brunt of Venezuela’s unfolding collapse.