Things That Matter

20 Destinations In Latin America Anthony Bourdain Visited In Order To Celebrate Culture And Cuisine

Anthony Bourdain, the inspiring storyteller, chef, and author who brought world cuisine into the homes of millions of people watching from TV sets passed away on Friday. He leaves behind a legacy of sharing stories from around the world and inspiring curiosity and empathy in his viewers. In the hours after his death, many took to social media to remember the ways in which the gifted chef made his advocacy for women and immigrants part of his greatest contributions to the world.

During Donald Trump’s 2016 election campaign the then-candidate vowed to deport 11 million undocumented immigrants during his presidency. At the time, Bourdain reminded voters of how much the United States depends on the contributions of undocumented immigrants. During an interview, Bourdain emphasized that the deportation of the country’s 11 million immigrants would undoubtedly disrupt the restaurant industry and cause every establishment in the US to “shut down.”

While also being a fierce advocate for immigrant, Bourdain also became enthusiast of Latin American cuisine and toured various countries during his time on his award-winning CNN series, “Parts Unknown” as well as his Travel Channel series “Anthony Bourdain: No Reservations” Here’s a look at 20 destinations in Latina America Bourdain visited.

1. Colombia

CREDIT: CNN

During his visit to Colombia, Bourdain explored several regions of the country including the mountains, the Caribbean coast, and the coca leaf-growing regions.

2. Peru

CREDIT: CNN

During a visit to Peru, Bourdain and world-renowned chef Eric Ripert explored the Indigenous Andes in search of a rare variety of wild cocoa.

3. Cuba

CREDIT: CNN

Bourdain explored Cuba’s bustling capital city of Havana, to the slower paced region of Santiago.

4. Mexico

CREDIT: CNN

Bourdain traveled to Mexico City, Oaxaca, and Cuernavaca and ate with local residents who expressed their passion for food and art.

5. Brazil

CREDIT: CNN

During his time on “Parts Unknown,” Bourdain toured Bahia, known as the “African heart of Brazil.” Here he showed viewers the internationally recognized form of Afro-Brazilian music and food.

6. Paraguay

CREDIT: CNN

An investigation into the puzzling history of the host’s great, great, great, grandfather, Paraguayan émigré Jean Bourdain, is a springboard to his first tour of this South American country.

7. Buenos Aires

CREDIT: CNN

Bourdain’s trip to meat-loving Buenos Aires featured a meal the famous Don Carlito’s and a late afternoon soccer match.

8. Minas Gerais, Brazil

CREDIT: CNN

Bourdain dove into the heart of Brazil it’s baroque architecture,  hillsides and cuisine. There he ate s frango ao molho pardo (which is broiled chicken in blood sauce).

9. Puerto Rico

CREDIT: CNN

Bourdain took to Puerto Rico to check out piña coladas and resorts. The chef discovered delicious food and kind people.

Parts unknown13.

10. Mexico/US Border

CREDIT: CNN

During his visit to the Southwest Texas’ US. Mexican border, Bourdain visited a bar for conversation.

11. Argentina

CREDIT: CNN

Tony took to “the end of the world,”  in Patagonia during his visit to the country of Argentina. 

12. Chile

CREDIT: CNN

During a visit to Chile, Bourdain tasted Chile’s cuisine and reflected on topographical diversity.

13. Panama

CREDIT: Travel Channel

While traveling in Panama, Bourdain discovered the crossroad of the country’s various cultures.

14. Ecuador

CREDIT: Travel Channel

Tony explored Ecuador’s eateries and street vendors.

15. Rio

CREDIT: Travel Channel

During a visit to Brazil, Bourdain toured with his wife and learned about the art of Jiu Jitsu and Brazilian cuisine. 

16. Dominican Republic

CREDIT: Travel Channel

Bourdain took a trip to the Dominican Republic. There Bourdain tasted DR cuisine staples like empanadas, nearly frozen beer and tostones.

17. Haiti

CREDIT: Travel Channel

Tony visited the Caribbean nation of Haiti after it sustained major damage during a hurricane. 

18. Nicaragua

CREDIT: Travel Channel

Tony headed to NIcaragua where he learned about the Nicaraguan spirit and the country’s determinationto maintain its spirit.

19. Colombia

CREDIT: Travel Channel

During a visit to Colombia while doing “Parts Unkown,” Bordain explores the countries timultious past and sublime cuisine. 

20. Peru

CREDIT: Travel Channel

Anthony Bourdain is on a mission to obtain personal enlightenment.

On a mission to discover personal enlightenment, Bourdain traveled to Peru and learned of the country’s culture, rich cuisine, and spirited people.


Read:

Recommend this story by clicking the share button below! 

As People Lose Their Jobs, They’re Not Sending Money To Their Families Back Home And It’s Having A Major Impact On Local Communities

Things That Matter

As People Lose Their Jobs, They’re Not Sending Money To Their Families Back Home And It’s Having A Major Impact On Local Communities

Pixabay

As the coronavirus continues its march around the world, economies from Brazil and Mexico to the United States and Colombia have been hit hard. The measures taken by governments to save lives have stalled economies, and are in the process of delivering a global recession. Economic contagion is now spreading as fast as the disease itself.

You don’t have to look any further than the unemployment numbers recorded each week in the United States. They’re at staggering, record-breaking levels. This huge impact on the U.S. economy, and its workers, is having an outsized impact on economies across Latin America as migrants aren’t able to send remittances back home to their families.

As the economic repercussions of the pandemic continue to grow, global remittances from migrants are being hit hard.

The pandemic is hitting jobs and wages in a variety of sectors of the global economy – including economies (like the U.S.) that depend on migrants. A global economic turndown will mean a slowdown in the amount of money these workers send back home to their families and will be crucial in spreading the economic contagion from richer countries to poorer ones.

For 2020, the International Monetary Fund is now predicting that the global economy will shrink by 3% – that’s a difference of trillions of dollars – and it will have trickle down effects on the world’s most vulnerable people.

Undocumented communities are especially vulnerable during economic downturns.

Credit: EqualityNYC / Instagram

Many of those who send remittances often work in the service industry and have been let go or furloughed from their jobs in hotels, restaurants or cleaning companies, without pay. Meanwhile, those who are undocumented cannot apply for unemployment, even though they likely contributed to state unemployment funds and paid taxes.

Even the recent federal stimulus bill – a $2 trillion dollar bill meant to dampen the impact of the Coronavirus pandemic – specifically left out undocumented migrants. It prevents even tax-paying migrants from receiving any federal aid. However, California has partnered with non-profits to become the first state to offer $500 in assistance to undocumented residents.

Remittances are crucial to the economies of poorer countries and help support millions of families.

Credit: @BancomerMX / Twitter

Remittances shelter a large number of poor and vulnerable households, underpinning the survival strategies of over 1 billion people. In 2019, an estimated 200 million people in the global migrant workforce sent home US$715 billion. Of this, it’s estimated US$551 billion supported up to 800 million households living in low- and middle-income countries.

And these families aren’t spending this money on cars and new computers. They’re spending it on everyday subsistence needs including food, medicines, and education. The World Bank projects that within five years, remittances will outstrip overseas aid and foreign direct investment combined, reflecting the extent to which global financial flows have been reshaped by migration.

In fact, global remittances hit record highs in 2018.

Credit: Pixabay

According to the World Bank, global remittances reached a record high in 2018, the last year for which figures are available. The flow of money to Latin America and the Caribbean grew by 10 percent to $88 billion in 2018, mostly due to the strong U.S. economy, where most of the money originates.

In many countries, remittances account for a significant portion of their gross domestic product. In Nicaragua and Guatemala they account for around 12 percent, and in El Salvador and Honduras, around 20 percent.

Mexico’s president, Andrés Manuel López Obrador, asked Mexicans in the United States not to stop supporting their relatives back home. He said February set a record in remittances to Mexico.

“Tell your countrymen to not stop sending help to their families in Mexico, who are also going through a difficult situation,” he said at a recent news conference.

Many migrants to the U.S. feel a strong responsibility to send back as much as they can to help their families back home.

Credit: @FamiliesBelongTogether / Twitter

Many immigrants to the U.S. are worried about not being able to send money to their parents, children, or abuelos back home. Many relatives depend on those who have emigrated to the U.S. to pay for electricity, food, medicine, and doctor’s visits. But with many losing their own jobs – money is just too tight for many.

In an interview with NBC News, Lesbia Granados – from Honduras – said what many can relate to, “I am everything to my parents, and it’s my responsibility to take care of them, after they did so much for me.”

It Could Be Time To Say Goodbye To Your Salsa Forever As Tomatoes And Chilies Are In Danger Of Going Extinct

Culture

It Could Be Time To Say Goodbye To Your Salsa Forever As Tomatoes And Chilies Are In Danger Of Going Extinct

Pixabay

Two of Latin America’s most important ingredients – staples of cuisines across the region – are in danger of possible extinction thanks to climate change. Tomatoes and chilies both make up a huge part of traditional recipes from Mexico to Brazil and Argentina to Cuba – and they’re close to disappearing from grocery stores everywhere.

We know that tomato and chili are two fundamental ingredients in Mexican cuisine. Due to the threats suffered by its main pollinator, the bumblebee, these basic ingredients could disappear forever.

Climate change is wreaking havoc on the planet. But one of the most at-risk species is the humble bumble bee. These often feared insects are a vital source of pollination for thousands of plant and flower species around the world – if they disappear so too do the species of plants that depend on them.

Pollinators are species of great importance for a healthy environment. They are responsible for the the diversity and health of various biomes. Across Latin America, the bumble bee is largely responsible for the pollination of modern agriculture and this could have a major impact on the production of tomatoes and chilis.

Unfortunately, bumblebees are currently threatened, resulting in the possible extinction of different vegetables, including tomatoes and chili.

But why does the tiny bumble bee matter at all?

The bumble bee belongs to the insect family Apidae, which includes hundeds of different species of bumblebees. In fact, the bumble bee can be found on every continent except Antarctica and plays an outsized role in agriculture. The insects are often larger than honey bees, come in black and white varieties and often feature white, yellow, or orange stripes. This genus belongs to the Apidae family that includes different species commonly known as bumblebees. They’re almost entirely covered by very silky hairs. An adult bumblebee reaches 20 millimeters or more and feeds primarily on nectar from flowering plants. A curious fact is that females have the ability to sting, while males do not.

Bumblebees are epic pollinators of the tomato and chili plantS. Together with different species, the bumblebee helps produce many staple foods that are part of healthy diets around the world. If these become extinct the eating habits of all Latinos would suffer drastic changes as several vegetables would disappear.

So why are bumblebees in danger?

The main threat of these insects is the pesticides used in modern agriculture. That is why it is necessary to avoid consuming food produced in this way. We can all help the bumblebee planting plants, protecting native species and especially not damaging their natural environment.

But climate change is also wreaking havoc on the breeding patters of bumblebees – leading to colony collapse. With fewer colonies there is less breeding and therefore fewer bees around the world to pollinate our global crops.

Can you imagine a world without tomatoes or chilies?

Salsa. Moles. Pico de gallo. Ketchup. Chiles rellenos. Picadillo. All of these iconic Latin American dishes would be in danger of going extinct along with the bumblebee – because what’s a mole without the rich, complex flavors of dried chilies?

Several groups are already working hard to help fund programs that would work to conserve the dwindling bumblebee populations. While others are working out solutions that could perhaps allow tomatoes and chilies to self-pollinate – much as other plants already do.