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17 Everyday Items That are Made in Mexico

It’s a widely known fact, that the U.S. imports most of its goods from other countries. These trade relationships are often put to the test when there are diplomatic problems between the States and other regions. Take for example the Trump Administration’s new tariff proposal. Due to this, we may soon have to pay a premium for our favorite Mexican goods.

The threat of tariffs is Trump’s response to immigrants from Central and South America passing through the Mexican border. The president is demanding that Mexico stop the migration or he will pass a 5% tariff on their exports to the US. Subsequently, this number could increase to 25% by October.

If the United States does enact these tariffs, the goods we get from Mexico are about to get considerably more expensive. For this reason, here are items made in Mexico that could be impacted.

1. NASA Jumpsuits

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It isn’t just the iconic NASA jumpsuits that are made in Mexico. All the clothing worn by NASA scientists and space explorers are made in Yucatán, Mexico. The company — Grupo Alsico Promex — also creates special clothing for international chemical laboratories using high tech material and equipment.

2. Fender Stratocaster guitars

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There are two versions of this iconic guitar, one made in the US and another in Mexico. It’s a common belief in the music world that the American model is a superior instrument so it already costs considerably more than the Mexican version. A tariff will raise the price of the more affordable model.

3. Colgate Toothpaste

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While there are toothpaste manufactoring plants all over the world, two of the most popular brands have facilities in Mexico. Procter & Gamble — makers of both Crest and Colgate — especially claim several of these plants. In fact, in 2011, it invested 250 Million into a full scale Mexian operation. The facility even makes toiletries like Gillette razors and blade refills.

4. Avocados and Other Produce

Instagram / @avocadosfrommexico

Avocados — the unofficial fruit of Mexico — are obviously grown down in the southern U.S. but that’s not all. In 2018, Mexico imported $7 Billion worth of veggies and $5 Billion in fruits and nuts to the United States. Do you enjoy tomatoes, beans, corn, squash, mango, pineapple, bananas or any of the many, many things grown in Mexico and sold to the United States? If so, you’ll be paying more because of these tariffs.

5. TVs and Electronics

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Asia is known for being the headquarters for many major electronics companies. However, Mexico is actually where these items are built. Specifically, Tijuana has become a hub for electrical manufacturing — producing $37 Billion in 2018 exports. Samsung has their Center for Digital Research and Technological Development in the city. Additionally, Vizio’s manufacturing has been stationed in Mexico since 2015.

6. Precious gems and metals

Instagram / @mspaltenjewelry

When the Spanish first came to Mexico, they coveted the riches that the earth had to offer. Fire opals, Mexican emeralds, quartz, gold, and silver are all mined down South. Raw ore is used for manufacturing purposes while refined materials are shipped all over the world to become jewelry.

7. Tequila

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Tequila is a regional drink native to Mexico. As such, it has protected designation of origin from 40 different countries. This means that they only acknowledge tequila made in Mexico by approved distilleries. In other words, tequila is a commodity that will cost you more if Mexican tariffs get approved.

8. Sugar Cane

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After corn, sugar cane is the second largest crop produced by Mexico. The sixth largest producer of sugar cane in the world, Mexico provides more of this product to the United States than any other exporter. If sugar cane faces a tariff, everything from raw sugar to carbonated beverage is going to go up in price.

9. Cerveza

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Two-thirds of all beer exported into the United States comes from Mexico so a tariff will hit the beer industry hard. The largest importer to the States, Constellation Brands makes Modelo, Corona, and Pacifico in Mexico. Dos Equis and Tecate are also imported from down South. Keep this in mind during your next beer run.

10. Printer Ink

Instagram / @olicanaoffice

While printer ink is made all over the world, Mexico claims the fastest growing market for this workplace necessity. In fact, it’s the second largest region for printer ink production in Latin America. An increase in price due to tariffs will hit all kinds of workplaces from schools and pharmacies to newspapers and shipping stores.

11. Cars and Trucks

Instagram / @ramtrucks

The automotive industry is one of the pillars of the Mexican economy. In 2016, it exported over $45 Billion in passenger vehicles and trucks to the United States. Additionally, it sent over $90 Billion in automotive parts to the country. This huge number is twice what the US imported from Japan. Popular brands like Cadillac, Chevrolet, Ford, and Dodge all build in Mexico, too.

12. Fast fashion

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Fast fashion is what happens when clothing manufacturers take a new trend and produce replicas cheap and quickly. China used to be the place to have these items made. Recently, clothing brands have discovered that manufacturing in Mexico is much cheaper than in Asia. So, next time you shop, you might notice an increase in price tags.

13. Cement

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Cement isn’t just for driveways; it’s a multibillion-dollar industry. North America’s second largest concrete producer, Cemex SAB, is actually established in Mexico. The over 100-year old company has a market value of over $14 Billion.

14. Medical Supplies

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While some items on this list are extravagances that can be cut back on, this one could mean life or death. The United States imports $9 Billion in medical devices and supplies. Among the items are syringes, needles, catheters, therapeutic appliances, orthopedics, prosthetics, and mobility devices. An increase in these items can hurt an already struggling American Health Care system.

15. Mexican vanilla extract

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Vanilla beans were first cultivated in Mexico. However, finding pure vanilla extract can be difficult as some manufacturers delude it with alcohol or tonka bean extract. Pure Mexican vanilla extract will already cost you a bit more than the alternatives but an additional tariff can make it especially expensive.

16. Coffee

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Though coffee is grown all over the world, Mexico is the eighth largest grower. It also happens to be the largest source of US coffee imports. The commercialized coffee industry contributes to a number of jobs for both the Mexican and US economies. Increased tariffs will add pennies to the price of your coffee but will also impact everyone along the chain of production.

17. Blue jeans

Instagram / @levis

The United States imports nearly all its clothing. In particular, more men’s blue jeans come from Mexico to the US than any other country. In 2018, the States imported almost $700 Million from Mexico — a whopping 40% of blue jeans it imported in total.

Police Brutality Protests Intensify Following Autopsy Of Mexican Who Died In Police Custody

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Police Brutality Protests Intensify Following Autopsy Of Mexican Who Died In Police Custody

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Protests against police brutality have sprung up around the world. People are tired of police departments killing unarmed citizens and the latest unrest is coming from Mexico after a man was killed by police after being arrested.

Mexican protests against police brutality intensified this week.

Protesters took to the streets through Jalisco to protest the death of Giovanni López at the hands of the police. The 24-year-old was allegedly arrested for not wearing a face mask on May 4 in Ixtlahuacán de los Membrillos, Jalisco, near Guadalajara. An autopsy of López revealed that the cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head prompting protests against police brutality.

A video of the arrest has been spreading all over social media showing López being arrested by a group of police officers.

People at the scene and in the video are shocked at the force used in the arrest. Multiple police officers can be seen surrounding López as they attempt to put him in the police car. The police officers can be heard degrading López and those defending him during the arrest.

“Vanni, we’re coming for you,” a man is heard saying.

“Shut up, you p*ssy,” a police officer responds.

López can be heard begging for help as the police apprehended him.

According to the video, police claim that López was resisting arrest to justify the police presence at the arrest. There are unsubstantiated allegations of government-backed attempts to bribe López’s family for their silence.

López’s death sparked intense protests in Mexico demanding justice and police accountability.

#JusticiaParaGiovanni demonstrations, centralized in Jalisco, cropped up after the autopsy was released. There were already Black Lives Matter protests happening in Mexico to show support for the U.S. movement. López’s death amplified that anger and the result is violent protests.

One video circulating on social media shows a police officer being set on fire.

State Prosecutor Gerardo Octavio Solís claims that López was arrested for “aggressive behavior” but the family disputes that claim. Mexicans have long had a contentious relationship with law enforcement, many of which have been trained by U.S. forces.

“There are long histories of police brutality in both countries,” Tom Long, an expert on Mexican security at the University of Warwick, told The Guardian. “[Militarization] is a recipe for police violence, particularly aimed at those with the fewest monetary and societal resources to hold (them) accountable.”

READ: Venezuelan Singer Chyno Posted A Video Mocking Protesters And Calling Them Imbeciles And Delinquents

Mexico Plans To Reopen Cancun To International Tourists But It’s Not At All Prepared For Visitors

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Mexico Plans To Reopen Cancun To International Tourists But It’s Not At All Prepared For Visitors

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There are millions of people just itching for a vacation right now, and Cancun wants to welcome visitors with open arms. However, there’s a huge problem with their plan. Most of the country is still in a severe phase of the pandemic – with all 32 states reporting daily increases in confirmed Covid-19 cases.

In cities such as Guadalajara and Mexico City, even locals aren’t allowed to venture far from their homes and restrictions on shopping, dining, and exercising are still in full force.

However, the country’s president, Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO), has resumed his cross-country travels and is trying to portray a ‘new normal’ – the problem is little has changed to prevent further outbreaks.

Cancun is aiming to open its doors to tourists from June 10 – but it makes zero sense given the actual situation on the ground.

Quintana Roo, home to the famed beaches of Cancun and Tulum, will resume activities next week – according to the governor, Carlos Joaquin Gonzalez. The state, which depends heavily on tourism, has lost over 83,000 jobs in the last few months due to the pandemic, and with reopening the state could see an economic rebound. However, that entirely depends on the success and implementation of safety measures.

In a press conference, the governor said that tourists could start arriving in the Caribbean destination as soon as June 8th. He added that tourism is an essential activity and that there is no other of greater importance in Quintana Roo “and we are going to fight for it to be considered that way.”

He stressed during the public address that for the opening to happen by June 10th, protocols and hygiene measures must be followed to protect workers and tourists from Covid-19.

And he has good reason to reopen. According to a new survey by Expedia, ‘Cancun flights’ is one of the top 5 searches on the platform. In the same survey, Playa del Carmen, Cancun and Isla Mujeres (all located in Quintana Roo) were announced as three of the most internationally sought after destinations.

Meanwhile, AMLO has launched a cross-country tour touting the lifting of Coronavirus restrictions.

Credit: Rebecca Blackwell / Getty

President AMLO also held his daily press conference from the state of Quintana Roo to mark the beginning of Mexico’s economic reopening and resume his tours across the country.

But this too makes zero sense. Yes, the government has mandated that states can begin lifting restrictions – if they’re no longer declared ‘red zones.’ However, every state in the country is still in the red, with many seeing peak infection numbers.

It’s just the most recent example of confusing messaging from the president.

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While AMLO is eager to get the country reopened and put Mexicans back to work, Coronavirus cases continue to rise across the country. Mexico has now recorded the seventh-highest number of Covid-19 deaths in the world, according to the Johns Hopkins tracker, with nearly 10,000 virus-related fatalities and almost 100,000 confirmed cases. Testing in the country is low and health officials acknowledge that the numbers are likely much higher.

The federal government unveiled a red-light/green-light system to implement reopening procedures state by state. But currently every state is still in ‘red-light’ phase – meaning stay-at-home orders are still in full effect – making AMLO’s messaging extremely confusing.

Time and time again, the president has downplayed the virus outbreak and has criticized stay-at-home orders for harming the economy.

Keep in mind, however, that non-essential travel between the U.S. and Mexico is still largely banned.

Since March, all non-essential travel has been banned between the U.S. and Mexico. However, that ban is currently set to expire on June 22. It’s possible both sides could extend the travel ban, but given AMLO’s rhetoric it isn’t likely he’ll keep the country closed to tourists for much longer.

However, it’s important to point that out even if you technically can travel – right now you really shouldn’t. In much of Mexico, confirmed Covid-19 cases are on the rise with many cities across the country just now entering it’s worst phase.