Entertainment

17 Everyday Items That are Made in Mexico

It’s a widely known fact, that the U.S. imports most of its goods from other countries. These trade relationships are often put to the test when there are diplomatic problems between the States and other regions. Take for example the Trump Administration’s new tariff proposal. Due to this, we may soon have to pay a premium for our favorite Mexican goods.

The threat of tariffs is Trump’s response to immigrants from Central and South America passing through the Mexican border. The president is demanding that Mexico stop the migration or he will pass a 5% tariff on their exports to the US. Subsequently, this number could increase to 25% by October.

If the United States does enact these tariffs, the goods we get from Mexico are about to get considerably more expensive. For this reason, here are items made in Mexico that could be impacted.

1. NASA Jumpsuits

Instagram / @harlemragshop1934

It isn’t just the iconic NASA jumpsuits that are made in Mexico. All the clothing worn by NASA scientists and space explorers are made in Yucatán, Mexico. The company — Grupo Alsico Promex — also creates special clothing for international chemical laboratories using high tech material and equipment.

2. Fender Stratocaster guitars

Instagram / @thegearcollective

There are two versions of this iconic guitar, one made in the US and another in Mexico. It’s a common belief in the music world that the American model is a superior instrument so it already costs considerably more than the Mexican version. A tariff will raise the price of the more affordable model.

3. Colgate Toothpaste

Instagram / @alohalovelyhawaii

While there are toothpaste manufactoring plants all over the world, two of the most popular brands have facilities in Mexico. Procter & Gamble — makers of both Crest and Colgate — especially claim several of these plants. In fact, in 2011, it invested 250 Million into a full scale Mexian operation. The facility even makes toiletries like Gillette razors and blade refills.

4. Avocados and Other Produce

Instagram / @avocadosfrommexico

Avocados — the unofficial fruit of Mexico — are obviously grown down in the southern U.S. but that’s not all. In 2018, Mexico imported $7 Billion worth of veggies and $5 Billion in fruits and nuts to the United States. Do you enjoy tomatoes, beans, corn, squash, mango, pineapple, bananas or any of the many, many things grown in Mexico and sold to the United States? If so, you’ll be paying more because of these tariffs.

5. TVs and Electronics

Instagram / @lespetitesaffairesdelodie

Asia is known for being the headquarters for many major electronics companies. However, Mexico is actually where these items are built. Specifically, Tijuana has become a hub for electrical manufacturing — producing $37 Billion in 2018 exports. Samsung has their Center for Digital Research and Technological Development in the city. Additionally, Vizio’s manufacturing has been stationed in Mexico since 2015.

6. Precious gems and metals

Instagram / @mspaltenjewelry

When the Spanish first came to Mexico, they coveted the riches that the earth had to offer. Fire opals, Mexican emeralds, quartz, gold, and silver are all mined down South. Raw ore is used for manufacturing purposes while refined materials are shipped all over the world to become jewelry.

7. Tequila

Instagram / @winenotevents

Tequila is a regional drink native to Mexico. As such, it has protected designation of origin from 40 different countries. This means that they only acknowledge tequila made in Mexico by approved distilleries. In other words, tequila is a commodity that will cost you more if Mexican tariffs get approved.

8. Sugar Cane

Instagram / @romrobban

After corn, sugar cane is the second largest crop produced by Mexico. The sixth largest producer of sugar cane in the world, Mexico provides more of this product to the United States than any other exporter. If sugar cane faces a tariff, everything from raw sugar to carbonated beverage is going to go up in price.

9. Cerveza

Instagram / @modelousa

Two-thirds of all beer exported into the United States comes from Mexico so a tariff will hit the beer industry hard. The largest importer to the States, Constellation Brands makes Modelo, Corona, and Pacifico in Mexico. Dos Equis and Tecate are also imported from down South. Keep this in mind during your next beer run.

10. Printer Ink

Instagram / @olicanaoffice

While printer ink is made all over the world, Mexico claims the fastest growing market for this workplace necessity. In fact, it’s the second largest region for printer ink production in Latin America. An increase in price due to tariffs will hit all kinds of workplaces from schools and pharmacies to newspapers and shipping stores.

11. Cars and Trucks

Instagram / @ramtrucks

The automotive industry is one of the pillars of the Mexican economy. In 2016, it exported over $45 Billion in passenger vehicles and trucks to the United States. Additionally, it sent over $90 Billion in automotive parts to the country. This huge number is twice what the US imported from Japan. Popular brands like Cadillac, Chevrolet, Ford, and Dodge all build in Mexico, too.

12. Fast fashion

Instagram / @entrecoreseamores

Fast fashion is what happens when clothing manufacturers take a new trend and produce replicas cheap and quickly. China used to be the place to have these items made. Recently, clothing brands have discovered that manufacturing in Mexico is much cheaper than in Asia. So, next time you shop, you might notice an increase in price tags.

13. Cement

Instagram / @toolreviewzone

Cement isn’t just for driveways; it’s a multibillion-dollar industry. North America’s second largest concrete producer, Cemex SAB, is actually established in Mexico. The over 100-year old company has a market value of over $14 Billion.

14. Medical Supplies

Instagram / @thejohnstonsblog

While some items on this list are extravagances that can be cut back on, this one could mean life or death. The United States imports $9 Billion in medical devices and supplies. Among the items are syringes, needles, catheters, therapeutic appliances, orthopedics, prosthetics, and mobility devices. An increase in these items can hurt an already struggling American Health Care system.

15. Mexican vanilla extract

Instagram / @two_acre_farm

Vanilla beans were first cultivated in Mexico. However, finding pure vanilla extract can be difficult as some manufacturers delude it with alcohol or tonka bean extract. Pure Mexican vanilla extract will already cost you a bit more than the alternatives but an additional tariff can make it especially expensive.

16. Coffee

Instagram / @sundarivijay_

Though coffee is grown all over the world, Mexico is the eighth largest grower. It also happens to be the largest source of US coffee imports. The commercialized coffee industry contributes to a number of jobs for both the Mexican and US economies. Increased tariffs will add pennies to the price of your coffee but will also impact everyone along the chain of production.

17. Blue jeans

Instagram / @levis

The United States imports nearly all its clothing. In particular, more men’s blue jeans come from Mexico to the US than any other country. In 2018, the States imported almost $700 Million from Mexico — a whopping 40% of blue jeans it imported in total.

A 25-Year-Old Woman Was Murdered And Skinned, Then Mexican Newspapers Published Photos Of Her Body

Things That Matter

A 25-Year-Old Woman Was Murdered And Skinned, Then Mexican Newspapers Published Photos Of Her Body

SkyNews/ Twitter

In Mexico, the recent brutal mutilation and slaying of a 25-year-old woman are spurning conversations about the country’s efforts to prevent femicide and laws that protect victims from the media.

On Sunday, Mexican authorities revealed that they had discovered the body of Ingrid Escamilla.

According to reports, Escamilla was found lifeless with her body skinned and many of her organs missing. At the scene, a 46-year-old man was also discovered alive. His body was covered in bloodstains and he was arrested.

As of this story wasn’t troubling enough, local tabloids and websites managed to bring more tragedy to the victim and her family by splashing leaked graphic photos and videos of the victim’s body. In a terribly crafted headline, one paper by the name of Pasala printed the photos on its front page with the headline “It was Cupid’s fault.” The headline is a reference to the fact that the man found at the scene was Escamilla’s husband.

According to leaked video footage from the arrest scene, Escamilla’s husband admitted to stabbing his wife after a heated argument in which she threatened to kill him. He then claimed to have skinned her body to eliminate evidence.

Mexic City’s mayor, Claudia Sheinbaum, revealed that prosecutors will demand the maximum sentence against the alleged perpetrator.

“Femicide is an absolutely condemnable crime. It is appalling when hatred reaches extremes like in the case of Ingrid Escamilla,” Sheinbaum wrote in a tweet according to CNN. According to reports, Mexico broke records in 2018 when its homicide record reached over 33,000 people that year.

The publication of Escamilla’s mutilated body has sparked discussions regarding the way in which reports about violence against women are handled.

Women’s rights organizations have lambasted the papers that originally published photos of Escamilla’s body and Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador also expressed criticism of the media’s response to the brutal slaying.

In a press conference on Thursday, President López Obrador expressed his determination to find and punish anyone responsible for the image leaks. “This is a crime, that needs to be punished, whoever it is,” he stated.

Conservationists At Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Reserve Are Being Murdered And Investigators Aren’t Sure Why

Things That Matter

Conservationists At Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Reserve Are Being Murdered And Investigators Aren’t Sure Why

Alan Ortega / Getty

Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly Reserve is one of the world’s most famous wildlife hotspots. Hundreds of thousands come each year to view the annual migration of millions of beautiful butterflies that call Mexico’s Michoacan state home during the winter.

However, this iconic and majestic habitat for one of the world’s most endangered animals is now the backdrop for a dramatic murder mystery that is unfolding in international headlines. Two conservationists have been discovered dead just days apart and investigators still aren’t sure why.

A second victim has been pronounced killed by authorities in Mexico’s Monarch Butterfly reserve.

Credit: Alan Ortega / Getty

One of the world’s most beautiful wildlife spots is now the backdrop for a dramatic double murder after two nature activists are discovered dead at Mexico’s El Rosario monarch butterfly sanctuary.

The deaths of Homero Gomez Gonzalez, manager of the butterfly reserve, and Raul Hernandez Romero, a tour guide at the sanctuary, have sent shockwaves across the world of wildlife conservation.

Hernandez Romero’s body was discovered on Saturday near the highest point of the mountainous sanctuary, which sits 9,000 feet above sea level in the state of Michoacan, about 130 miles west of Mexico City, according to a statement from the Michoacan state prosecutor’s office. Hernandez Romero’s family reported him missing on Friday, officials said.

The new victim was found just days after the first victim’s body was found after being missing for 16 days.

Credit: Alan Ortega / Getty

Authorities discovered his body about three days after the Hernandez Romero’s body was found in a pond near the Central Mexico town of El Soldado, prosecutors said.

An autopsy performed in the presence of State Human Rights Commission representatives determined Gomez Gonzalez died from “mechanical asphyxiation” after suffering head trauma and being submerged in water.

Gomez Gonzalez, whose family reported him missing two weeks ago, was one of the region’s most prominent conservation activists and a vocal defender of the monarch butterflies. He had launched a campaign against illegal logging that threatens the butterflies nesting grounds.

Although petty crime and theft is common in these parts of Mexico, authorities don’t believe this to be the case in Gonzalez’s death. He was found with about $9,000 pesos (or about $500 USD) on him when his body was discovered.

Mexico’s Monarch butterfly preserve is a UNESCO Biosphere reserve that draws hundreds of thousands of tourists each year.

Credit: omgitsjustintime / Instagram

Each winter, millions of monarch butterflies make their home at the El Rosario reserve in Mexico — one of the best places in the world to see them. Local guides lead tourists up the mountainside on foot and horseback to where the monarchs cluster in fir and pine trees. Their bright orange wings flit amid the mild weather of Michoacán, and signs ask for silence as visitors enter the nesting areas.

The El Rosario sanctuary is part of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve, which was enshrined as a UNESCO World Heritage site in 2008, calling the overwintering concentration of butterflies there “a superlative natural phenomenon.” It noted that more than half of overwintering colonies of the monarch butterfly’s eastern population are found in these specific areas of Mexico.

But the same forests that draw butterflies to migrate thousands of miles each winter are under threat from illegal logging and clandestine avocado farms.

Credit: omgitsjustintime / Instagram

Officials in the state of Michoacán said they were unsure if the two deaths were linked – or related to the men’s work in the butterfly reserve. The state has seen a rising tide of violence in recent years, and the region around the monarch butterfly reserve has been rife with illegal logging, despite a ban imposed to protect the monarchs, which winter in the pine- and fir-covered hills.

Some illegal clearcutting is also carried out to allow for the planting of avocado orchards – one of Mexico’s most lucrative crops and an important part of Michoacán’s economy.

The deaths again called attention to the disturbing trend in Mexico of environmental defenders being killed as they come into conflict with developers or local crime groups, who often have political and police protection.