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17 Everyday Items That are Made in Mexico

It’s a widely known fact, that the U.S. imports most of its goods from other countries. These trade relationships are often put to the test when there are diplomatic problems between the States and other regions. Take for example the Trump Administration’s new tariff proposal. Due to this, we may soon have to pay a premium for our favorite Mexican goods.

The threat of tariffs is Trump’s response to immigrants from Central and South America passing through the Mexican border. The president is demanding that Mexico stop the migration or he will pass a 5% tariff on their exports to the US. Subsequently, this number could increase to 25% by October.

If the United States does enact these tariffs, the goods we get from Mexico are about to get considerably more expensive. For this reason, here are items made in Mexico that could be impacted.

1. NASA Jumpsuits

Instagram / @harlemragshop1934

It isn’t just the iconic NASA jumpsuits that are made in Mexico. All the clothing worn by NASA scientists and space explorers are made in Yucatán, Mexico. The company — Grupo Alsico Promex — also creates special clothing for international chemical laboratories using high tech material and equipment.

2. Fender Stratocaster guitars

Instagram / @thegearcollective

There are two versions of this iconic guitar, one made in the US and another in Mexico. It’s a common belief in the music world that the American model is a superior instrument so it already costs considerably more than the Mexican version. A tariff will raise the price of the more affordable model.

3. Colgate Toothpaste

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While there are toothpaste manufactoring plants all over the world, two of the most popular brands have facilities in Mexico. Procter & Gamble — makers of both Crest and Colgate — especially claim several of these plants. In fact, in 2011, it invested 250 Million into a full scale Mexian operation. The facility even makes toiletries like Gillette razors and blade refills.

4. Avocados and Other Produce

Instagram / @avocadosfrommexico

Avocados — the unofficial fruit of Mexico — are obviously grown down in the southern U.S. but that’s not all. In 2018, Mexico imported $7 Billion worth of veggies and $5 Billion in fruits and nuts to the United States. Do you enjoy tomatoes, beans, corn, squash, mango, pineapple, bananas or any of the many, many things grown in Mexico and sold to the United States? If so, you’ll be paying more because of these tariffs.

5. TVs and Electronics

Instagram / @lespetitesaffairesdelodie

Asia is known for being the headquarters for many major electronics companies. However, Mexico is actually where these items are built. Specifically, Tijuana has become a hub for electrical manufacturing — producing $37 Billion in 2018 exports. Samsung has their Center for Digital Research and Technological Development in the city. Additionally, Vizio’s manufacturing has been stationed in Mexico since 2015.

6. Precious gems and metals

Instagram / @mspaltenjewelry

When the Spanish first came to Mexico, they coveted the riches that the earth had to offer. Fire opals, Mexican emeralds, quartz, gold, and silver are all mined down South. Raw ore is used for manufacturing purposes while refined materials are shipped all over the world to become jewelry.

7. Tequila

Instagram / @winenotevents

Tequila is a regional drink native to Mexico. As such, it has protected designation of origin from 40 different countries. This means that they only acknowledge tequila made in Mexico by approved distilleries. In other words, tequila is a commodity that will cost you more if Mexican tariffs get approved.

8. Sugar Cane

Instagram / @romrobban

After corn, sugar cane is the second largest crop produced by Mexico. The sixth largest producer of sugar cane in the world, Mexico provides more of this product to the United States than any other exporter. If sugar cane faces a tariff, everything from raw sugar to carbonated beverage is going to go up in price.

9. Cerveza

Instagram / @modelousa

Two-thirds of all beer exported into the United States comes from Mexico so a tariff will hit the beer industry hard. The largest importer to the States, Constellation Brands makes Modelo, Corona, and Pacifico in Mexico. Dos Equis and Tecate are also imported from down South. Keep this in mind during your next beer run.

10. Printer Ink

Instagram / @olicanaoffice

While printer ink is made all over the world, Mexico claims the fastest growing market for this workplace necessity. In fact, it’s the second largest region for printer ink production in Latin America. An increase in price due to tariffs will hit all kinds of workplaces from schools and pharmacies to newspapers and shipping stores.

11. Cars and Trucks

Instagram / @ramtrucks

The automotive industry is one of the pillars of the Mexican economy. In 2016, it exported over $45 Billion in passenger vehicles and trucks to the United States. Additionally, it sent over $90 Billion in automotive parts to the country. This huge number is twice what the US imported from Japan. Popular brands like Cadillac, Chevrolet, Ford, and Dodge all build in Mexico, too.

12. Fast fashion

Instagram / @entrecoreseamores

Fast fashion is what happens when clothing manufacturers take a new trend and produce replicas cheap and quickly. China used to be the place to have these items made. Recently, clothing brands have discovered that manufacturing in Mexico is much cheaper than in Asia. So, next time you shop, you might notice an increase in price tags.

13. Cement

Instagram / @toolreviewzone

Cement isn’t just for driveways; it’s a multibillion-dollar industry. North America’s second largest concrete producer, Cemex SAB, is actually established in Mexico. The over 100-year old company has a market value of over $14 Billion.

14. Medical Supplies

Instagram / @thejohnstonsblog

While some items on this list are extravagances that can be cut back on, this one could mean life or death. The United States imports $9 Billion in medical devices and supplies. Among the items are syringes, needles, catheters, therapeutic appliances, orthopedics, prosthetics, and mobility devices. An increase in these items can hurt an already struggling American Health Care system.

15. Mexican vanilla extract

Instagram / @two_acre_farm

Vanilla beans were first cultivated in Mexico. However, finding pure vanilla extract can be difficult as some manufacturers delude it with alcohol or tonka bean extract. Pure Mexican vanilla extract will already cost you a bit more than the alternatives but an additional tariff can make it especially expensive.

16. Coffee

Instagram / @sundarivijay_

Though coffee is grown all over the world, Mexico is the eighth largest grower. It also happens to be the largest source of US coffee imports. The commercialized coffee industry contributes to a number of jobs for both the Mexican and US economies. Increased tariffs will add pennies to the price of your coffee but will also impact everyone along the chain of production.

17. Blue jeans

Instagram / @levis

The United States imports nearly all its clothing. In particular, more men’s blue jeans come from Mexico to the US than any other country. In 2018, the States imported almost $700 Million from Mexico — a whopping 40% of blue jeans it imported in total.

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

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Mexico City Could Soon Change Its Name To Better Embrace Its Indigenous Identity

Mexico City is the oldest surviving capital city in all of the Americas. It also is one of only two that actually served as capitals of their Indigenous communities – the other being Quito, Ecuador. But much of that incredible history is washed over in history books, tourism advertisements, and the everyday hustle and bustle of a city of 21 million people.

Recently, city residents voted on a non-binding resolution that could see the city’s name changed back to it’s pre-Hispanic origin to help shine a light on its rich Indigenous history.

Mexico City could soon be renamed in honor of its pre-Hispanic identity.

A recent poll shows that 54% of chilangos (as residents of Mexico City are called) are in favor of changing the city’s official name from Ciudad de México to México-Tenochtitlán. In contrast, 42% of respondents said they didn’t support a name change while 4% said they they didn’t know.

Conducted earlier this month as Mexico City gears up to mark the 500th anniversary of the fall of the Aztec empire capital with a series of cultural events, the poll also asked respondents if they identified more as Mexicas, as Aztec people were also known, Spanish or mestizo (mixed indigenous and Spanish blood).

Mestizo was the most popular response, with 55% of respondents saying they identified as such while 37% saw themselves more as Mexicas. Only 4% identified as Spaniards and the same percentage said they didn’t know with whom they identified most.

The poll also touched on the city’s history.

The ancient city of Tenochtitlán.

The same poll also asked people if they thought that the 500th anniversary of the Spanish conquest of Tenochtitlán by Spanish conquistadoresshould be commemorated or forgotten, 80% chose the former option while just 16% opted for the latter.

Three-quarters of respondents said they preferred areas of the the capital where colonial-era architecture predominates, such as the historic center, while 24% said that they favored zones with modern architecture.

There are also numerous examples of pre-Hispanic architecture in Mexico City including the Templo Mayor, Tlatelolco and Cuicuilco archaeological sites.

Tenochtitlán was one of the world’s most advanced cities when the Spanish arrived.

Tenochtitlán, which means “place where prickly pears abound” in Náhuatl, was founded by the Mexica people in 1325 on an island located on Lake Texcoco. The legend goes that they decided to build a city on the island because they saw the omen they were seeking: an eagle devouring a snake while perched on a nopal.

At its peak, it was the largest city in the pre-Columbian Americas. It subsequently became a cabecera of the Viceroyalty of New Spain. Today, the ruins of Tenochtitlán are in the historic center of the Mexican capital. The World Heritage Site of Xochimilco contains what remains of the geography (water, boats, floating gardens) of the Mexica capital.

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Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

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Mexico Plunges 23 Places On The World Happiness Report As The Country Struggles To Bounce Back

When it comes to international happiness rankings, Mexico has long done well in many measurements. In fact, in 2019, Mexico placed number 23 beating out every other Latin American country except for Costa Rica. But in 2020, things looks a lot different as the country slipped 23 spots on the list. What does this mean for Mexico and its residents? 

Mexico slips 23 spots on the World Happiness Report thanks to a variety of compelling factors.

Mexico plummeted 23 places to the 46th happiest nation in the world, according to the 2020 happiness rankings in the latest edition of the United Nations’ World Happiness Report. The coronavirus pandemic had a significant impact on Mexicans’ happiness in 2020, the new report indicates.

“Covid-19 has shaken, taken, and reshaped lives everywhere,” the report noted, and that is especially true in Mexico, where almost 200,000 people have lost their lives to the disease and millions lost their jobs last year as the economy recorded its worst downturn since the Great Depression.

Based on results of the Gallup World Poll as well as an analysis of data related to the happiness impacts of Covid-19, Mexico’s score on the World Happiness Report index was 5.96, an 8% slump compared to its average score between 2017 and 2019 when its average ranking was 23rd.

The only nations that dropped more than Mexico – the worst country to be in during the pandemic, according to an analysis by the Bloomberg news agency – were El Salvador, the Philippines and Benin.

Mexico has struggled especially hard against the Coronavirus pandemic. 

Since the pandemic started, Mexico has fared far worse than many other countries across Latin America. Today, there are reports that Mexico has been undercounting and underreporting both the number of confirmed cases and the number of deaths. Given this reality, the country is 2nd worst in the world when it comes to number of suspected deaths, with more than 200,000 people dead. 

Could the happiness level have an impact on this year’s elections?

Given that Mexico’s decline in the rankings appears related to the severity of the coronavirus pandemic here, one might assume that the popularity of the federal government – which has been widely condemned for its management of the crisis from both a health and economic perspective – would take a hit.

But a poll published earlier this month found that 55.9% of respondents approved of President López Obrador’s management of the pandemic and 44% indicated that they would vote for the ruling Morena party if the election for federal deputies were held the day they were polled.

Support for Morena, which apparently got a shot in the arm from the national vaccination program even as it proceeded slowly, was more than four times higher than that for the two main opposition parties, the PAN and the PRI.

Still, Mexico’s slide in the happiness rankings could give López Obrador – who has claimed that ordinary Mexicans are happier with him in office – pause for thought.

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