Things That Matter

11 Powerful Reasons Why People Protested For Immigrant Rights In Los Angeles This Weekend

Thousands of protesters met in downtown Los Angeles’ Pershing Square Park to show solidarity for immigrants. Children showed up to support immigrant parents, friends supported each other and whole families took to the streets to protest as a unit. Here are some of the people mitú spoke to about their reason for protesting.

Kimberly Calleros, 22

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m here just because this is something that I hold close to my heart,” Calleros told mitú. I come from a family of immigrants so I feel like it’s definitely something that I want to be out here and support, especially just because it’s something close to me. I feel like the people out here can make a difference and I can’t wait to see how far this goes.”

Jaqueline Martinez, 18

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m here because I’m tired of being scared,” Martinez told mitú. “I’m tired of feeling threatened and I feel like uniting with so many people who support people like me, because I’m a DACA-beneficiary, that’s just such a warm feeling and I’m here because of my parents. Like my sign says, she crossed for me so I’m here representing her.”

Lizbeth Molina, 23

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m here for my mother,” Molina told mitú. “I’m here for everyone whose voices have been silence by this society that’s been compromised by the tyrant that’s in power right now and because I have the right to be here. I’m just here to show solidarity.”

Jessica Alcantar, 24

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m here today because I come from a family of immigrants,” Alcantar told mitú. “I’m first-generation and first-generation in college with a master’s degree for my family. This country has offered us a lot of opportunities and I think that everyone who’s come here deserves those same opportunities.”

Ashley Ramirez, 19

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m here because everyone deserves to be here. This is literally the land of the free. We say that we accept people but how can we say we accept people when we’re deporting people back? We’re banning people who are Muslim. That just doesn’t make sense,” Ramirez told mitú. “My father, he’s an immigrant here. He’s trying so hard to get his green card and he has to live with that fear now of getting caught and being sent back. I am marching for my father. I am marching for so many people here today.”

Cuathmose, 50 (pictured right)

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“We are here to support the people at this march and what they are doing and to defend their rights,” Cuathmose told mitú.

Juan Silva, 28

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m here because I am supporting other immigrants,” Silva told mitú. “I am an immigrant from Sinoloa, Mexico.”

Jose Barragan, 36

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m here to represent what the American Dream can really be,” Barragan told mitú. “Right now the only defense we have against this administration is to take to the streets, show our resistance and really, for those who are still on the fence and think that the campaign was simply a war of words is in actuality becoming a war of actions and we are under attack. A lot of our communities are under attack.”

Valencia/Soto Family

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“We’re both the children of immigrants and I think it’s just important. I love this city and this city was built on immigrants, this whole country first off, but this city specifically,” Mary Valencia told mitú. “We want to show our sons that it’s not okay. What’s going on it not okay and we are all in this together. Whether it’s marching or supporting the organizations that are doing the grassroots work. We’ve got to do something.”

Sal Osorio, 37 (pictured left)

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m just supporting everyone who is an immigrant, you know, brothers, sisters, coworkers, friends from church, friends from school,” Osorio told mitú. “We’re all somehow connected to all of these people. We were all in that position at some time. Just because we are on this side of the wall doesn’t mean that, ‘Oh. It’s okay. It’s not going to affect us.'”

Soto/Serrano Family

Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez
CREDIT: Jorge Rodriguez-Jimenez

“I’m here because I think what Trump is doing is wrong,” Gloria Soto (pictured left) told mitú. “I don’t think it’s fair and I think we have to take a stand to show him that we’re not going to stay quiet; we’re not going to back down. Immigrants are a part of America and part of our history and he can’t change that.”


READ: Here’s What ICE Is Saying About The Arrest Of 23-Year-Old Mexican DACA Recipient


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Google Is Pledging $250K To Help With DACA Applications And Renewals

Things That Matter

Google Is Pledging $250K To Help With DACA Applications And Renewals

SANDY HUFFAKER / AFP via Getty Images

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, is not a contentious topic among Americans. The program offers young adults who entered the U.S. as children relief from deportation and a chance to live out of the shadows. Now that it has been reinstated, Google wants to help some people achieve the dream of being a DACA recipient.

Google is pledging a quarter of a million dollars to help people apply for DACA.

The Trump administration did everything in their power to end DACA. The constant uncertainty has left hundreds of thousands of young people in limbo. The war waged against Dreamers by the Trump administration came to a temporary end when a federal judge ruled that Chad Wolf was illegally installed as the head of the Department of Homeland Security. It invalidated a member from Wolf stating that no new DACA applications would be approved.

Kent Walker, the SVP of Global Affairs, laid out the case for DACA in an essay.

Walker discusses the uncertainty the hundreds of thousands of DACA recipients currently face after the tumultuous time for the program. He also touches on the economic hardships that has befallen so many because of the pandemic. With so many people out of work, some Dreamers do not have the money to apply or renew their DACA due to a lack of financial resources. For that reason, Google is getting involved.

“We want to do our part, so Google.org is making a $250,000 grant to United We Dream to cover the DACA application fees of over 500 Dreamers,” writes Walker. “This grant builds on over $35 million in support that Google.org and Google employees have contributed over the years to support immigrants and refugees worldwide, including more than $1 million from Googlers and Google.org specifically supporting DACA and domestic immigration efforts through employee giving campaigns led by HOLA (Google’s Latino Employee Resource Group).”

People are celebrating Google for their decision but are calling on Congress to do more.

Congress will ultimately have to decide on what to do for the Dreamers. There has been growing pressure from both sides of the aisle calling on Congress to work towards granting them citizenship. DACA is a risk of being dismantled at any moment. It is up to Congress to come through and deliver a bill to fix the issue once and for all.

“We know this is only a temporary solution. We need legislation that not only protects Dreamers, but also delivers other much-needed reforms,” writes Walker. “We will support efforts by the new Congress and incoming Administration to pass comprehensive immigration reform that improves employment-based visa programs that enhance American competitiveness, gives greater assurance to immigrant workers and employers, and promotes better and more humane immigration processing and border security practices.”

READ: New DACA Applications Were Processed At The End Of 2020 For The First Time In Years

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New Netflix Docuseries Explores The Summer The Night Stalker Terrorized Los Angeles

Entertainment

New Netflix Docuseries Explores The Summer The Night Stalker Terrorized Los Angeles

Bettmann / Getty Images

Richard Ramirez, a.k.a. The Night Stalker, spent the summer of 1985 terrorizing Los Angeles. Ramirez murdered 13 people during his reign of terror in Southern California. Netflix’s new docuseries is exploring the crime by interviewing law enforcement and family of the victims.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial” killer is now streaming on Netflix.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial Killer” is the latest Netflix docuseries diving into the true crimes that have shaped American society. Richard Ramirez is one of the most prolific serial killers of all time and single-handedly terrorized Los Angeles during the summer of 1985.

Ramirez fundamentally changed Los Angeles and the people who live there. The serial killer was an opportunistic killer. He would break into homes using unlocked doors and opened windows. Once inside, he would rape, murder, rob, and assault the people inside the home.

The documentary series explores just how Ramirez was able to keep law enforcement at bay for so long. The killer did not have a standard modus operandi. His victims ran the gamut of gender, age, and race. There was no indicator as to who could be next. He also rarely used the same weapon when killing his victims. Some people were stabbed to death while others were strangled and others still were bludgeoned.

While not the first telling of Ramirez’s story, it is the most terrifying account to date.

“Victims ranged in age from 6 to 82,” director Tiller Russell told PEOPLE. “Men, women, and children. The murder weapons were wildly different. There were guns, knives, hammers, and tire irons. There was this sort of feeling that whoever you were, that anybody could be a victim and anybody could be next.”

Family members of the various victims speak in the documentary series about learning of the horror committed to them. People remember grandparents and neighbors killed by Ramirez. All the while, police followed every lead to make sure they left no stone unturned.

“Night Stalker: The Hunt For a Serial Killer” is now streaming on Netflix.

READ: Here’s How An East LA Neighborhood Brought Down One Of America’s Most Notorious Serial Killers

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