Things That Matter

11 People Told Us Why They Went To The Day Without A Woman Rally In Los Angeles

A Day Without A Woman protests took place all over the country on March 8. Mitú was in downtown Los Angeles to talk to protesters to find out why they were there and what woman inspired them the most in life. Here is what they told us.

Carlos Heredia, 34

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“[I’m here] because I grew up watching my mom be beat up and my sisters taken advantage of because they’re women. Us as men need to stand up and protect women,” Heredia told mitú.

He added: “My mom [inspires me the most] because no matter what hardship she went through she is an example of strength and a mother’s love. Whether it was washing tables or cleaning up somebody else’s feces, she worked hard so her kids could have. I’ve seen her go nights without sleeping just so her children can have.”

Wendy Carrillo, 36, Congressional Candidate

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here today because it is International Women’s Day and also A Day Without A Woman and I think now more than ever women need to stand up against an administration that cares very little about women’s rights or immigrants or LGBTQ folks or refugees. So, this is a moment when we take our place in history,” Carrillo told mitú.

“My mother inspires me the most,” Carrillo continued. “She is courageous and powerful and unapologetic and it is only through my own growing up and becoming a woman myself that I;m able to recognize her struggle and sacrifice that she did when she was much younger than what I a now.”

Veronica Peña, 36

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m her because I’m a woman and I feel like there is so much work that needs to be done. I’m looking at my daughter and I want her to have more than I have I want her to live with the same rights, the same energy and the same authority that men have in this country. I want her to think nothing less of herself and until then I will keep fighting,” Peña told mitú.

“I would have to say there is actually a group of women,” Peña added. “I just moved her from Chicago and I played with Diesel Daisies and these women have been through the sixties and seventies and the eighties and they have imparted in me the courage and the responsibility and as lesbian, as a mother, as a woman to continue this fight. I would have never felt this drive to fight if it wasn’t for these women who’ve been fighting for decades and decades.”

Maria Jose Jimenez, 18

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I just feel like it’s important for women to empower each other, especially right now after what happened with the election and all the immigration issues that are going on. Women are more afraid to speak up so I feel like this day is important just to let them know that we’re here and we’re supporting each other. It’s just an important day,” Jose Jimenez told mitú.

“I would say my mom,” Jose Jimenez continued while pointing to her mom. “My mom is really tough. She’s always supporting me in what I want to do. If I have a crazy idea she says, ‘Do it.’ She’s never said no or set a limit to me so I feel like that important and that we should all have that mind set that we can do anything.”

Diana Lopez, 44

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CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here to support my hermanas. Following in the spirit of adelitas, I’m trying to use my freedom of being a woman born in this country to help and represent the women around the world come up, find equality, have their voices heard on every and any level. What I would want to share with all my hermanas is to help each other no matter how big or how small. Whether you have power or the finances to back the campaign or contribute or just mentoring someone at work or teaching your daughters that they are powerful and mighty,” Lopez told mitú.

“My mother grew up in a time where women were really pushed to the side and weren’t really allowed to speak up, especially in our culture. She resisted and she persevered and she raised my sisters and me to have the force within us and not let anyone push us aside.”

Adrian Lopez, 17

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CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here because I want to be that person that can give a voice to all the people that are oppressed by the society that we are living in today. I’m here for my sisters and y mom because my mom is an immigrant and came here for a better life and thanks to that I’m living a life that allows me to give a voice to the people who don’t have one,” Lopez told mitú.

“I feel like I speak for everyone when I say that our mother’s were there for us. They gave birth to us and literally gave us our lives,” Lopez continued. “Thanks to that, I want to be here to support her and give her her rights. She works day and night but she doesn’t get equal pay and I want that for her.”

Valeria Dimas, 34

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CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I think it is important that we strive to keep the rights that women have fought for. Our right to vote, Planned Parenthood, the right to free choice of our body, the right to equal pay. I’m here today to keep the movement going because I want my god-children to be raised in a world where they can do anything and be anything and their rights are still there,” Dimas told mitú.

Dimas added: “The women of my family. I come from a line of strong Latina women who fought for their own rights in their families. They didn’t want to be married off and they fought to marry who they wanted to marry and they came to America and fought for their families here. They are the strongest ones of our family.”

Kristina Garcia, 26

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CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here because I feel like it’s time to kind of show everyone that we’re serious and we need to be taken seriously. Unfortunately, we live in a time where, because we’re women, we’re seen as lesser than or incapable of certain things that others have just because they are male. I think it is time we stand up and band together and really make a statement about how we feel, what we deserve, and just not put up with it anymore. I just want equality. I don’t expect to be treated better or easier than a male. I just want to be treated the same,” Garcia told mitú.

“I’m inspired by the women that work at Planned Parenthood because I know what they deal with,” Garcia told mitú. “I see the hate and the judgement they face and, not just the people that work there, but the people who use their services and have to cross this picket lines. The fact the Planned Parenthood has to engage in volunteers just to escort people into their buildings just to use the services is just ridiculous.”

Leslye Lopez, 23

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CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I am here because I want to stand up for my first-graders who are immigrant kids from immigrant families. I want to stand up for all the teachers and all the women who are unrepresented. For LGBTQ people and also, of course, women,” Lopez, who was there with her sister told mitú.

“Honestly, I would say the people I work with simply because they are underpaid and overworked and I see the struggles they have to face,” Lopez said. “They’re not getting what they need but they are still there and that’s why I’m here.”

Jacqueline Lopez, 20

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here because women are being treated unfairly. I feel that women have to fight against the wage gap. I am also trying to be a teacher so I am here for the future,” Lopez, Leslye’s sister, told mitú.

“I would say my mom because she is an immigrant and she has done so much for us and I feel like immigrants need to be represented more.”

Bianca Peralta, 23

Kathryn Boyd-Batstone
CREDIT: Kathryn Boyd-Batstone

“I’m here to protest for equality. I am also here to protest for the #FreeTheNipple campaign. I don’t think it’s fair that men can go jog with their shirts off and a woman can’t breastfeed in public because it looks terrible. I’m here to promote that. I’m here for equality. I feel like after so many years that it’s time and I feel like we shouldn’t go down just because of Trump. I feel like we should band together and stay strong,” Peralta, with her brother Alexander, told mitú.

“Rosa Parks is very inspiring to me. Not only because she was a woman of color but because she was one of the first women to stand up to everybody. I feel like that is something courageous for her to do and I support that.”


READ: 11 Powerful Reasons Why People Protested For Immigrant Rights In Los Angeles This Weekend

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A Chilean Police Officer Is Charged With Attempted Murder After Throwing a Protestor Off Of a Bridge

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A Chilean Police Officer Is Charged With Attempted Murder After Throwing a Protestor Off Of a Bridge

Photo by Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

Earlier this month, a police officer in Santiago, Chile was captured on video pushing a 16-year-old male demonstrator off of a bridge. The boy fell into the canal below, fracturing his wrist and suffering head trauma. He was transported to the hospital and is in stable condition.

The violent video sparked an additional wave of protests against the Carabineros–Chile’s militarized national police force that the officer was a part of.

Before the video surfaced, witnesses who were protesting voiced their anger at the police officer’s actions and demanded that he be brought to justice. Initially, a spokesperson for the Carabineros, General Enrique Monrás, denied any wrongdoing on the part of the officer, claiming that the boy “lost balance and fell”.

Monrás claimed the police force even had footage that refuted the purported events. But when the footage of the boy being pushed over the bridge went public, there was no question as to what happened.

The footage of the incident went viral in Chile, prompting a surge of demonstrations and protests in Santiago–a city already racked with civil unrest.

CLAUDIO REYES/AFP via Getty Images)

Days later, Chile opened up an investigation against the police officer, saying the officer “gave false information to the Prosecutor’s Office” and had “abandoned the victim” after throwing him off the bridge. The officer’s lawyer says he was following procedure. Nevertheless, by then the damage had been done.

Following the incident, protestors threw red die into the canal, making it look like it was running red with the metaphorical blood of protestors. The protests are part of an ongoing civil unrest that was sparked by economic inequality in Chile as well as President Sebastián Piñera’s failure to address the people’s concerns.

To make matters worse, the Piñera government has responded to the protests with excessive violence.

In the last year, Chile has been making headlines for permanently blinding protestors with rubber bullets. Protestors claim that Caballeros are deliberately shooting people in the eyes, aiming to blind them for life.

This most recent incident has simply served to bolster the protestors’ claims that they are being treated brutally by the Chilean government. “The police are violent. We can’t bear it anymore,” said a protestor named Carmen Soria to Al Jazeera News. “They’ve raped, tortured, run people over, blinded others, and now, they’re throwing people in the Mapocho river. The government doesn’t want us to protest, doesn’t want us to gather together, but they don’t care that we gather in the busses and in subways like sardines to go to work.”

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People Have Taken To The Streets Across The Country In Breonna Taylor Protests

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People Have Taken To The Streets Across The Country In Breonna Taylor Protests

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Cities across the U.S. are seeing a new wave of unrest following the grand jury’s finding on the Breonna Taylor case. Emotions are high as people protest against the lack of charges against the officers who were involved in Taylor’s death.

Protesters are raising their voices after the decision not to charge all of the officers involved in Breonna Taylor’s death.

Breonna Taylor was shot and killed on March 13 when police raided her apartment. The 26-year-old ER technician was sleeping when the police executed a “no-knock” warrant. However, police had the wrong address and Taylor’s boyfriend, believe their lives were in danger, fired at the police. Taylor was shot and killed in her apartment that night.

Major cities across the country saw major demonstrations spurred by the anger against the justice system.

A grand jury found one officer responsible for wanton endangerment after firing his weapon into neighboring apartments. There were no charges tied directly to Taylor’s death. The lack of charges has angered activists and advocates who are seeking significant police reform to prevent tragedies like this from happening again.

People have become hyper-aware of the issue and are paying attention to the outcomes.

Protest signs in different crowds show that the American people are paying attention. The Black Lives Matter movement became the cause at the forefront of American mentality since George Floyd’s death in Minneapolis. Floyd’s death sparked national outrage and renewed energy into fighting to stop the disproportionate violence Black men, women, and children face at the hands of police.

Some motorists have turned violent against the protesters.

Video captured in both Denver and Los Angeles show vehicles driving through crowds of protesters. In Denver, the driver claims to have acted in self-defense after protesters surrounded his car. The driver claims that he did not intend to hurt anyone but reacted when protesters shattered his windshield.

In Louisville, police arrested the only Black woman in the Kentucky state legislature for protesting.

State Rep. Attica Scott was arrested for first-degree rioting, which is a class-D felony. The Louisville Metropolitan Police Department arrested 24 people Thursday night while protesting the decision not to charge the officers. Rep. Scott was arrested with other and charged with first-degree rioting and two misdemeanors for unlawful assembly and failure to disperse.

“Our call to action is to continue to make sure that the city of Louisville understands that we will not go away, that we will continue to demand the defunding of police and the dismantling of this police department because it’s corrupt from the inside out, from the bottom to the top,” Scott told NPR before the grand jury decision. “And it cannot continue to function in the way that it does.”

Taylor’s death has mobilized the nation with celebrities and politicians calling for justice.

The fight for racial justice and a systemic change to our justice and policing systems is ongoing. The people are tired of being scared and are taking a stand with their protests.

If you are out there protesting, send us your videos and photos so we can see your activism in action!

READ: Oprah Winfrey Honors Breonna Taylor With Historic O Magazine Cover

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