Things That Matter

If You’re Heading to Pride This Month, Be Sure To Drop That Money On These LGBTQ+ Organizations Too

We’ve put together a list of groups run by Latinxs that benefit LGBTQ+ people, for you to consider gifting this Pride Month. Beware! Contributing to these organizations this month will work to ensure that the gente of this community will be provided with access to education, mental health services, and support for years to come after you donate. No matter how big or small your contribution is, know that this counts!

1. Pride Fund to End Gun Violence

The Political Action Committee (PAC) that is Pride Fund to End Gun Violence works to support candidates who will push for gun policy reform while also fighting for the safety and continued support of the LGBTQ+ community. The organization was founded in the aftermath of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando and has made makes disarming those who are against the LGBTQ+ community a vital issue.

Donate here.

2. TransLatin@ Coalition

The TransLatin@ Coalition is a national organization advocating for the needs of U.S.-based trans immigrant Latinas and producing resources to empower trans leaders. With a presence in California, Florida, Chicago, Texas and the DMV (Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia) area, the women work directly with policymakers and change-makers to find solutions to issues impacting the trans Latina community and instill lasting structural changes.

Donate here.

3. Mijente

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Mijente is a national political home for Latinx and Chicanx digital and grassroots organizing. The pro-Black, pro-woman, pro-queer and pro-poor space, which is headed and co-founded by Marisa Franco, is one for strategizing, co-conspiring, campaigning and strengthening our movements as well as connecting and resting.

Donate here.

4. Equality Federation

Equality Federation works with state-based organizations advocating for LGBTQ people. From Equality Florida to Freedom Oklahoma to Basic Rights Oregon, the organization works to magnify the power of LGBTQ+ people at a local level.

Donate here.

5. Nalgona Positivity Pride

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Nalgona Positivity Pride is a Xicana-Brown*-Indigenous body positive project that provides intersectional body positivity, eating disorders awareness and cultural affirmation. Founder Gloria Lucas created the space in an effort to examine how historical trauma and social oppression, like racism, colonialism and homophobia, can lead to violent relationships with food and eating disorders in communities of color. NPP offers much-needed support groups and educational resources for survivors and sufferers who are repeatedly erased from eating disorder research and advocacy.

Donate here.

6. Casa Ruby

Casa Ruby is a bilingual, multicultural organization providing life-saving services and programs for LGBTQ youth. The Washington, D.C.-based group, founded and run by trans salvadoreña Ruby Corado, offers a drop-in community center that provides hot meals, clothing exchanges and housing referrals as well as support groups, case management and legal services counseling.

Donate here.

7. Casa De Esperanza

Casa de Esperanza is a Minnesota-based organization working toward ending domestic violence in the Latinx community. Locally, the group, which has its own hotline and shelter, helps survivors of domestic violence access public benefits, seek immigration remedies, provide court advocacy, navigate law enforcement systems, find transitional housing and provide emotional support, while also educating youth on healthy relationships. Nationally, the bilingual organization participates in public policy advocacy and conducts culturally relevant research.

Donate here.

8. National Latina Institute For Reproductive Health

The National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) is the sole national reproductive justice organization dedicated to guarding and advancing health, dignity and justice for U.S. Latinas and their families. With headquarters in New York and Washington, D.C., and sites in Florida, Texas and Virginia, the group fights for abortion access and affordability, sexual and reproductive health equity and immigrant women’s health and rights, among so much more.

Donate here.

9. The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network

The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network aims to transform the way queer and trans people of color are provided mental health care. The group works to provide a community of resource sharing, community, support, as well as connection and learning among queer and trans people of color. The organization’s Mental Health Fund for Queer and Trans People of Color provides financial assistance to those who struggle to receive access to mental health support. It also highlights the economic problems that queer and trans people of color are often faced to battle on their own when dealing with the healthcare system.

Donate here.

10. Trevor Project

Founded in 1998 by the creators of the Academy Award-winning short film “Trevor,” the organization provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGTBQ+ youth under the age of 25. Since its creation, hundreds of thousands of young people in crisis have accessed The Trevor Project’s multiple resources. Such resources have included a 24-hour mental health hotline, webchat, and text message services.

Donate here.

11. It Gets Better Project

By now, you probably already know the It Gets Better Project. The nonprofit organization which has worked to empower LGBTQ youth has long been supported by celebrities the world over. The company’s ultimate goal has been to show LGBTQ youth that the devasting experiences of our adolescence won’t always be our experiences.

Donate here.

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Bad Bunny Talks Depression And Says Sometimes He Still Feels Like The Boy Who Bagged Groceries Back Home

Entertainment

Bad Bunny Talks Depression And Says Sometimes He Still Feels Like The Boy Who Bagged Groceries Back Home

Kevin Mazur/Getty Images

Bad Bunny is on top of the world. Or, at least, that’s how it appears to all of us on the outside enjoying his record-breaking year. Not only did he release three albums in 2020 but he also landed his debut acting role in the Netflix series Narcos: Mexico and from his Instagram stories, he seems to be in a happy, contentful relationship.

But like so many others, Bad Bunny has his experience with mental health issues, of which he recently opened up about in an interview with El País.

Bad Bunny recently spoke up about his struggle with depression.

Despite his immense success that’s catapulted him to, arguably, the world’s biggest superstar, Bad Bunny admits that sometimes he still feels like the young man who bagged groceries in a supermarket.

The reggaetonero revealed in an interview with El País that right as his career really started to take off, he was not happy. “You asked me before how I hadn’t gone crazy. Well, I think that was the moment that was going to determine if I was going to go crazy or not. From 2016 to 2018 I disappeared, I was stuck in a capsule, without knowing anything. The world saw me, but I was missing,” he said.

Although no doctor diagnosed him, he is sure of what was happening. it only did he feel lost and empty but he had stopped doing many of the things that brought him joy, like watching movies and boxing. Without realizing it, he had also fallen out of contact with much of his family, with whom he was typically very close.

“And that’s when I said: who am I? What’s going on?” he told El País. When he returned home to Puerto Rico from spending time in Argentina, he was able to get back into the right state of mind and remember who he was.

Despite his success, Bad Bunny still worries he’s in financial trouble.

Although today, he is the number one Latin artist on Spotify and the awards for his music keep coming, there are times when Bad Bunny still thinks that he has financial problems.

“Not long ago, I was 100% clear in my head what I have achieved, maybe a year or six months ago; but until then, many times I forgot, I felt that I was the kid from the supermarket. He would happen something and say: “Hell!” And then: “Ah, no, wait, if I have here,” he said, touching his pocket.

Much like Bad Bunny, J Balvin has also been candid about his own mental health struggles.

Bad Bunny is just the most recent to speak to the emotional havoc he experiences despite being a global superstar. And, thankfully, like many other celebrities, he’s been able to find refuge in a reality that allows him to keep his feet on the ground so that he too can enjoy the achievements of his career.

Much like El Conejo, J Balvin is known for the brightness of his style and mentality. But he’s long addressed the importance of caring for one’s mental health. During his Arcoíris Tour, he encouraged people to not be ashamed of seeking professional help, and let the audience know they are not alone.   

“Las enfermedades de salud mental son una realidad. Yo he sufrido de depresión y he sufrido de ansiedad, así que tengo que aceptarlo. Y eso me hace más humano, me hace entender que la vida tiene pruebas,” Balvin said. “Pero si alguien está pasando una situación difícil, no están solos, siempre llega la luz. Tarde o temprano llega la luz.”  

“Mental health illnesses are a reality. I have suffered from depression and anxiety, so I have to accept it. And this makes me more human. It makes me understand that life has challenges,” Balvin said in Spanish. “But if someone is going through a difficult time, they are not alone, light always comes. Sooner or later, the light comes.”  

We need more men like Benito and J Balvin to speak up about their mental health struggles, to help destroy the stigma that exists within our community.

And in the same interview, he also spoke about why he works to elevate the Spanish language.

As for the possibility of singing in English, the answer remains the same: a resounding no.

“You have to break this view that the gringos are Gods…No, papi,” he told El País. And, although he’s collaborated with artists like Drake, Cardi B and Jennifer Lopez, he has always sang in Spanish and with his famous accent.

“I am very proud to reach the level where we are speaking in Spanish, and not only in Spanish, but in the Spanish that we speak in Puerto Rico. Without changing the accent,” he said.

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This Holiday Season Give To These Organizations That Are Helping Our Community

Things That Matter

This Holiday Season Give To These Organizations That Are Helping Our Community

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As we approach “the most wonderful time of the year,” it is important to remember the importance of giving back to the community. If you want to give back this holiday season, we have compiled a list of 10 organizations all with a different mission to donate to.

United We Dream

United We Dream is one of the largest immigrant youth-led communities in the country. They aim to inspire and empower undocumented immigrant youth to make their voices heard. They expertly use social media to activate their audience and inform their community of important moments. They also launched the National Undocu Fund in April to provide financial assistance to undocumented people affected by the COVID-19 pandemic who could not receive benefits for the government stimulus.

Young Center For Immigrant Children’s Rights

The Young Center advocates for the well-being of unaccompanied children arriving in the United States. The goal of the organization is to change the immigration system so that children in immigration proceedings are recognized as children. When you make a donation, it will go towards providing a Child Advocate for a child. The role of the advocate is to look for the child’s best interests including custody and release and serve as allies to the children during deportation proceedings. 

UPROSE

UPROSE is the oldest Latino community organization based in Brooklyn. It was founded in 1966 with a focus on the global climate justice movement. “UPROSE views the just urban policy—ranging from transportation to open space—as the heart of climate adaptation and community resilience,” reads a statement on the website. If you want to donate to environmental efforts led by a Latino organization, check out UPROSE’s website

The Center for Gender and Refugee Studies

The Center for Gender and Refugee Studies aims to protect the human rights of refugee women, children, the LGBTIA community, and others who flee their home countries. They provide legal expertise, training,  and engage in appellate litigation and policy development. 

Hispanic Scholarship Fund

The Hispanic Scholarship Fund (HSF) aims to provide a path to higher education for Latino and Hispanic students. They provide Latino families with the knowledge and resources needed for the path to higher education. They provide scholarships for our community and have awarded over $588 million. “HSF strives to make college education a top priority for every Latino family across the nation, mobilizing our community to proactively advance that goal,” states the website. 

Voto Latino

The grassroots political organization is dedicated to empowering the Latino community through civic engagement, issue advocacy, and leadership development. In the past 2020 election cycle, the organization registered 601,330 voters. To donate to their efforts, check out the Voto Latino website

RAICES

RAICES is a non-profit organization based in San Antonio Texas that provides free and low-cost legal services to immigrant children, families, and refugees. “When you donate to RAICES, your gift will go towards securing the release of thousands of people and ensuring that each person receives quality legal and social services,” reads the donation page. For more information about RAICES, click here.

Farmworker Justice

Farmworker Justice is a nonprofit organization that seeks to empower migrant and seasonal farmworkers to improve their living and working conditions, immigration status, health, occupational safety, and access to justice. The COVID- 19 pandemic has made it clear how essential field and farmworkers are to the nation. Many of these workers lacked PPE equipment while working and this organization launched the “Soy Indispensable” Initiative to provide face masks for farmworkers. 

Immigrant Families Together

Immigrant Families Together is dedicated to reuniting immigrant families separated at the US/Mexico border. Your donation to this organization goes to providing legal counsel, payment of bonds, detention support, housing, food, clothing, transportation, and medical care. If you are passionate about keeping families together, donate to Immigrant Families Together. 

Latino Victory Fund

The Latino Victory Fund is a progressive organization. The mission of the organization is to build political power in the Latino community. They aim to have the voices and values of Latinos reflected in all levels of government and in the policies passed.

READ: Instead Of Celebrating Her Quince, This Teen Donated It All To Help Victims Of Covid-19

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