Things That Matter

If You’re Heading to Pride This Month, Be Sure To Drop That Money On These LGBTQ+ Organizations Too

We’ve put together a list of groups run by Latinxs that benefit LGBTQ+ people, for you to consider gifting this Pride Month. Beware! Contributing to these organizations this month will work to ensure that the gente of this community will be provided with access to education, mental health services, and support for years to come after you donate. No matter how big or small your contribution is, know that this counts!

1. Pride Fund to End Gun Violence

The Political Action Committee (PAC) that is Pride Fund to End Gun Violence works to support candidates who will push for gun policy reform while also fighting for the safety and continued support of the LGBTQ+ community. The organization was founded in the aftermath of the Pulse nightclub shooting in Orlando and has made makes disarming those who are against the LGBTQ+ community a vital issue.

Donate here.

2. TransLatin@ Coalition

The TransLatin@ Coalition is a national organization advocating for the needs of U.S.-based trans immigrant Latinas and producing resources to empower trans leaders. With a presence in California, Florida, Chicago, Texas and the DMV (Washington, DC, Maryland and Virginia) area, the women work directly with policymakers and change-makers to find solutions to issues impacting the trans Latina community and instill lasting structural changes.

Donate here.

3. Mijente

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Mijente is a national political home for Latinx and Chicanx digital and grassroots organizing. The pro-Black, pro-woman, pro-queer and pro-poor space, which is headed and co-founded by Marisa Franco, is one for strategizing, co-conspiring, campaigning and strengthening our movements as well as connecting and resting.

Donate here.

4. Equality Federation

Equality Federation works with state-based organizations advocating for LGBTQ people. From Equality Florida to Freedom Oklahoma to Basic Rights Oregon, the organization works to magnify the power of LGBTQ+ people at a local level.

Donate here.

5. Nalgona Positivity Pride

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Nalgona Positivity Pride is a Xicana-Brown*-Indigenous body positive project that provides intersectional body positivity, eating disorders awareness and cultural affirmation. Founder Gloria Lucas created the space in an effort to examine how historical trauma and social oppression, like racism, colonialism and homophobia, can lead to violent relationships with food and eating disorders in communities of color. NPP offers much-needed support groups and educational resources for survivors and sufferers who are repeatedly erased from eating disorder research and advocacy.

Donate here.

6. Casa Ruby

Casa Ruby is a bilingual, multicultural organization providing life-saving services and programs for LGBTQ youth. The Washington, D.C.-based group, founded and run by trans salvadoreña Ruby Corado, offers a drop-in community center that provides hot meals, clothing exchanges and housing referrals as well as support groups, case management and legal services counseling.

Donate here.

7. Casa De Esperanza

Casa de Esperanza is a Minnesota-based organization working toward ending domestic violence in the Latinx community. Locally, the group, which has its own hotline and shelter, helps survivors of domestic violence access public benefits, seek immigration remedies, provide court advocacy, navigate law enforcement systems, find transitional housing and provide emotional support, while also educating youth on healthy relationships. Nationally, the bilingual organization participates in public policy advocacy and conducts culturally relevant research.

Donate here.

8. National Latina Institute For Reproductive Health

The National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health (NLIRH) is the sole national reproductive justice organization dedicated to guarding and advancing health, dignity and justice for U.S. Latinas and their families. With headquarters in New York and Washington, D.C., and sites in Florida, Texas and Virginia, the group fights for abortion access and affordability, sexual and reproductive health equity and immigrant women’s health and rights, among so much more.

Donate here.

9. The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network

The National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network aims to transform the way queer and trans people of color are provided mental health care. The group works to provide a community of resource sharing, community, support, as well as connection and learning among queer and trans people of color. The organization’s Mental Health Fund for Queer and Trans People of Color provides financial assistance to those who struggle to receive access to mental health support. It also highlights the economic problems that queer and trans people of color are often faced to battle on their own when dealing with the healthcare system.

Donate here.

10. Trevor Project

Founded in 1998 by the creators of the Academy Award-winning short film “Trevor,” the organization provides crisis intervention and suicide prevention services to LGTBQ+ youth under the age of 25. Since its creation, hundreds of thousands of young people in crisis have accessed The Trevor Project’s multiple resources. Such resources have included a 24-hour mental health hotline, webchat, and text message services.

Donate here.

11. It Gets Better Project

By now, you probably already know the It Gets Better Project. The nonprofit organization which has worked to empower LGBTQ youth has long been supported by celebrities the world over. The company’s ultimate goal has been to show LGBTQ youth that the devasting experiences of our adolescence won’t always be our experiences.

Donate here.

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The Cast of ‘Glee’ Along With Demi Lovato Paid Tribute to Naya Rivera At the GLAAD Awards

Entertainment

The Cast of ‘Glee’ Along With Demi Lovato Paid Tribute to Naya Rivera At the GLAAD Awards

Photo via Getty

On Thursday, the cast of “Glee” paid tribute to Naya Rivera at the GLAAD Media Awards. Rivera was a once-in-a-lifetime talent the touched so many lives personally and through the screen while she was alive. But perhaps none of Naya’s roles were as impactful as Santana Lopez was.

This year, GLAAD decided to take time to honor the impact Naya Rivera had on LGBTQ representation onscreen.

During a time when LGBTQ represenation onscreen was rare, Santana Lopez was groundbreaking for being both queer and Latina. Santana went from a shut-off closeted cheerleader to an out-and-proud lesbian woman. This was a story arc many queer kids had never seen before.

Demi Lovato introduced the cast of “Glee” with a touching speech. She described how honored she was (and still is) to have played Santana’s girlfriend, Dani, on the show.

“I don’t have to tell you that this year was a tough, tough year,” Lovato said. “A particular moment of heartbreak stands out for me: losing my friend Naya Rivera. I will always cherish the chance I got to play Naya’s girlfriend, Dani, on ‘Glee.’”

“The character Naya played, Santana Lopez, was groundbreaking for closeted queer girls — like I was at the time,” she went on. “And her ambition and accomplishments inspired Latina women all over the world.”

Then, dozens of former “Glee” cast members gathered via Zoom to pay tribute to Naya Rivera.

The tribute featured former “Glee” actors like Darren Criss, Jane Lynch, Matthew Morrison, Amber Riley, Heather Morris, Harry Shum Jr., Jenna Ushkowitz, Chris Colfer, and Kevin McHale. There were also many others.

“Naya would be honored to receive this recognition,” read the statement. “When Naya was told that Santana would be a lesbian she called me to let me know and I asked her how did she feel about that and she said ‘I feel great about it!'”

“This year marks the tenth anniversary that Naya’s character, Santana Lopez, came out on ‘Glee’,” said Dot-Marie Jones, who played Coach Beast on the Fox series.

“Santana basically got disowned by her family. And as alot of us know, that’s a feeling too many LGBTQ kids know too well,” continued Chris Colfer, who played Kurt Hummel.

The loving tribute then ended with a written statement from Naya Rivera’s mother Yolanda Previtire, who couldn’t make it to the call.

“Little did we know that she would impact so many people in the LGBTQ community. Her desire was to always be an advocate to those who did not have a voice.

“She continued: “I don’t believe that she realized how important she was to this world. I am grateful that my eldest daughter helped to change the landscape of how we view and see each other.”

“Her desire was to always be an advocate to those who did not have a voice,” the message read, in part. “I don’t believe that she realized how important she was to this world. I am grateful that my eldest daughter helped to change the landscape of how we view and see each other.”

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More Anti-Trans Bills Have Been Introduced in 2021 Than Any Year in History

Things That Matter

More Anti-Trans Bills Have Been Introduced in 2021 Than Any Year in History

Trans rights are under siege in over half of the United States this year, as 28 states have proposed one or more anti-trans bills. The bills range from banning trans children from playing on sports teams to prohibiting doctors from giving trans youth life-saving care. 

Despite winning the White House and both houses of Congress, we cannot grow complacent. Now is the time for others from the LGBTQ community and allies to stand up and protect our trans brothers and sisters.

At least 28 states have proposed anti-trans legislation that could severely harm the community.

Less than three months into the new year, Republican lawmakers have already introduced a record number of anti-trans bills across the country.

According to a report published Monday by Axios, at least 73 pieces of legislation have already been put forward in state legislatures targeting members of the transgender community. Of those proposals, 65 specifically single out trans youth, such as bills prohibiting the kinds of medical care doctors can offer trans minors and others seeking to limit the participation of trans student athletes in school sports. 

Notable examples include legislative efforts by South Dakota and Mississippi, both of which passed bills in the past week blocking trans girls from competing in school athletics in accordance with their gender identity. After being approved by their respective Houses and Senates, their governors have vowed to sign them.

These would be the first bills of their kind to become law in the U.S. after numerous attempts to pass anti-trans sports bills in previous years. In 2019, a bill targeting trans student athletes failed in the South Dakota House by just one vote.

LGBTQ+ advocates are warning that the influx of this type of legislation will harm trans and nonbinary youth.

Trans advocates and experts argue that bills like this do not protect young trans people, and recent studies support this. In February, the Center for American Progress (CAP) released a report which argued that banning the trans community from certain sports programs would deprive an entire group of people of the benefits of athletics, including lower risks of depression, anxiety, and drug use. Despite so many states introducing legislation targeting trans youth in sports, the report also found that the argument of an “unfair advantage” does not actually hold up to data-driven scrutiny.

“This has been a significant part of my work at the ACLU for the past six years and I’ve never seen anything like this,” Chase Strangio, deputy director for transgender justice at the ACLU, told CNN. “There have never been this many bills targeting trans youth voted out of committee and then making it to the floor.”

There is widespread opposition to anti-trans bills, and not just from LGBTQ+ civil rights groups. More than 55 major corporations have endorsed a statement against these bills and anti-LGBTQ+ legislation in general; they include Facebook, Pfizer, Microsoft, AT&T, Apple, Dell, American Airlines, and many more. Nearly 550 college athletes have signed a letter to the National Collegiate Athletic Association demanding that championship games be pulled from states that have anti-trans sports laws or are close to enacting them. More than 1,000 child welfare groups have taken a stand against legislation that would keep trans youth out of school sports or deny them health care.

States that enact anti-LGBTQ+ legislation often experience boycotts, as was the case with North Carolina and its anti-trans “bathroom bill” in 2016 and Indiana with its discriminatory religious freedom law in 2015. The former has now been repealed, the latter amended.

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