relationships

She Shared A Photo Recreating Her Mother’s Graduation Photo But So Many People Are Obsessed With The Family’s Beauty

Madeleine Tarin is a recent graduate from Chino Hills High School in California. Tarin celebrated her graduation via a tweet and people can’t handle how adorable her family looks. Tarin shared two images: one of her mother’s graduation, when she was a tiny tike, and another of her own graduation, with the family recreating the same pose, at Tarin’s request. Tarin spoke with mitú about her graduation, her viral tweet and what it means to her family.

Tarin’s tweet featured a photo of her mother’s graduation and Tarin’s recent graduation.


Tarin’s mother and father were 17 and 19, respectively, in her mother’s graduation photo. She admits that it was not easy for them to start a family so young.

“It wasn’t easy, but my parents have always had a special bond. They’re best friends. They had a lot of help from both of my grandparents. They had a lot of love and support from them as well,” Tarin told mitú. “Although their lives changed after having me, my mom was able to attend regular high school and went back to school right after having me. My parents still went to dances and were able to live a normal teenage life.They both agreed they would beat the statistics and mold me into something great.”

Tarin’s parents are excited to see their daughter achieve this milestone…

CREDIT: Courtesy of Madeleine Tarin

“My parents were incredibly proud of me because we’ve had many years of growing up and maturing together as a family,” Tarin told mitú about her graduation. “They definitely felt a sense of accomplishment. They feel as if they have molded me into a great role model for my two younger sisters.”

… and they look forward to the next phase of her education.

CREDIT: Courtesy of Madeleine Tarin

Tarin told mitú that her parents have always instilled the idea that she had to get good grades to get to college. Tarin says her parents encouraged her to attend college so she could be more accomplished than them.

Thanks to her parents’ persistence, her studying, and her athletic skills, Tarin will be attending Rider University.

CREDIT: Courtesy of Madeleine Tarin

“I actually used their story for my college admission essay. When I told them I used their unique story, I think that’s when it really hit them that I was growing up, and I really looked up to them and all that they have done for me,” Tarin told mitú about getting into college and getting both an academic and sports (soccer) scholarship to attend Rider University.

The emotional response to the tweet was strong and immediate.


It’s not every day you can see a family recreate graduation photos. ?

Grown men were admitting that the tweet brought them to tears.


Because men have feelings too.

And a lot of people were just showering Tarin with congratulations.


A few dudes gave the dad props for how chill he was in the photos.


Peak Latino dad.

And so many people were falling over themselves over how beautiful the family is.


Like, literally, some people couldn’t get over it.


Congratulations, Madeleine. Best of luck at Rider University!


READ: Here’s Why People Are Getting Super Emotional Over This Father/Daughter Prom Tweet

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Every Time I Go Back To The Dominican Republic, I Remember The Person I Am And Want To Be

Culture

Every Time I Go Back To The Dominican Republic, I Remember The Person I Am And Want To Be

aruni_y_photography / Instagram

Anyone traveling to the Dominican Republic this summer has likely been met with the cautionary warning; “Don’t drink anything from the minibar.” Eleven tourist deaths on the island in 2019, ranging from natural causes to counterfeit alcohol consumption, have spurred FBI and State Department investigations. Though news of flight and hotel cancellations abounded, I missed my family and refused to let fear stop me from seeing them. Since I lived to tell the tale, here are a few things I learned about my father, about myself, and about the precarious paradise that keeps calling me back.

Billy Joel and Nas have interpreted the “New York state of mind,” and if you have ever visited the Dominican Republic beyond the purpose of tourism, you’ll know that there exists a Dominican state of mind too.

Credit: Dan Gold / Unsplash

Whenever I exit Las Americas or Puerto Plata airports, humidity slaps me in the face, and my Dominican mindset is immediately activated. On this island, electricity does not run 24/7. When the electricity goes, or as we say “se fue la luz,” water doesn’t run from the tap either. All that is left to do is swap your sneakers for flip-flops, and exorcise your need for immediate gratification. It takes practice, and I re-learn this lesson with each visit.

The Dominican Republic is changing fast. 

Credit: zonacolonialrd / Instagram

There is new construction everywhere you look. I sit on the balcony chatting with my father and stare across the street trying to remember how it looked before the apartment building was constructed in that space. I can see from an open doorway on the ground level that wooden boxes are being stacked, and hauled out in front of a business. I tune out my father’s voice as I focus on the shape and size of the boxes. My Spanish needs work, and I ask my father, “Papi, what does ataúd mean?” The business slogan translates to “Quality Coffins.” I think about magic realism traditions in Latin American literature, and I am reminded that so often a country like this juxtaposes disparate images and experiences in such a casual manner. I don’t think I would be able to live across the street from a constant reminder of death anywhere else but on this incongruous island.

We drive to the countryside of El Seibo for a few days.

Credit: fedoacurd/ Instagram

My father syncs his playlist and he directs my sister what song to play next. The first song is by Boy George. I watch my father sing along, and I can’t help but think about the Dominican Republic’s homophobic culture steeped in hyper-masculinity. Same-sex marriage is not recognized on the island, and members of the LGBTQ community continue to face discrimination and violence. I talk to my sister about this later that night, and she tells me small changes are coming to the island. The city of Santo Domingo hosts inclusive events like Draguéalo, where you can even sign up for a Vogue class.

Credit: Draguelao / Facebook

My father’s playlist continues and I’m struck by his selections ranging from Taylor Swift to A.I.E. (A Mwana), a song by a 1970s group called Black Blood, featuring lyrics in Swahili.

I watched this Dominican dad jam across continents, decades, cultures, languages, and race. I realize there is so much I don’t know about him, and so often we shortchange our parents’ knowledge and experience, reducing them to stereotypes and gendered tropes.

My next lesson is on staying sexy.

                                                           Unsplash/Photo by Ardian Lumi 

After a few days in the countryside, my sister and I rent a hotel room in La Zona Colonial. We ready for a night out when she looks at my outfit and asks me, “Um, is that what you’re wearing tonight?” I thought my yellow jumpsuit was poppin’. My sister pulls out a little black dress from her overnight bag and kindly suggests I wear it. The dress is tiny. It’s skimpy. It’s super short. It’s absolutely perfect. I channel my inner Chapiadora, Goddess of Sex Appeal and Free Drinks, and dance all night. 

Growing up in the 90s, I styled myself in oversized men’s clothing. It wasn’t until that one magical summer in the Dominican Republic when the heat was too oppressive to wear jeans, so I wore—gasp—a skirt. That was the first time I felt sexy, and learned the power of sex appeal. Though I wielded that power throughout my twenties, it fell away in my thirties. Wearing my sister’s LBD I realize I still have “it,” and in the Dominican Republic, sex appeal is ageless. Be careful when you come here. You may fall in love with a local, or you may just fall in love with yourself again.

The island leaves me with one last lesson.

It comes late one night, sharing a few bottles of wine with my father and sister. No hay peor ciego que el que no quiere ver—the worst blind person is the one who refuses to see. I could say the current political landscape in the U.S. reflects this willful ignorance, a refusal to see; yet it is the same human experience felt across space and time.

I come away wondering about my own blind spots.

                                                            Instagram/@rensamayoa

I board my return flight thinking up ways to combat willful ignorance at home, thinking about maintaining that flexible DR state of mind and thinking about buying a little black dress. As tourism in the Dominican Republic picks up again, and unfavorable headlines drop out of the news cycle, this changing island stands in its own plurality welcoming visitors, and offering endless opportunities to teach us something new.

READ:

Soledad O’Brien Has Been Taking Down People On Twitter And OMG

Entertainment

Soledad O’Brien Has Been Taking Down People On Twitter And OMG

JD Lasica / Flickr

Soledad O’Brien’s journalistic career is known for delivering hard-hitting truths without playing the political game of ‘playing nice.’ She’s calling Trump a racist and she’s calling out The New York Times‘ for refraining from calling Trump a racist because “that language is a turn off to some readers.” 

O’Brien is so matter-of-fact, her show is called, “Matter of Fact with Soledad O’Brien.” If you’re not watching her show, her Twitter feed is as blunt as it gets. She’s savagely taking down ignorant fathers who wouldn’t know consent education if it hit them in the cojones, and they still don’t know what hit them. Here are O’Brien’s victims from this month alone:

This father who victim-blamed survivors of sexual assault, but he told his daughter to just kick the guy in the cojones so “She’s no one’s victim.”

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

After one person called O’Brien out for being “a bit harsh” given that “he at least taught her to say no,” someone named Zoe actually had to explain. “It’s not harsh,” Zoe replied. “He only taught her to say no in very specific situations that almost never happen. I guarantee he never taught her how to say no to relatives, friends, boyfriends, bosses, etc – people you can’t just hit due to freezing up, or social/financial/etc consequences.”

RIP, white men and your naive musings about a post-Trump America.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Sorry, bro, people of color are simply unfazed to see racism thrive in America. Fox & Friends will never shun Trump so long as he’s stoking the fear-baiting racist fires. O’Brien dared to say what we all couldn’t fathom–Trump will get his own show on Fox & Friends, whether he gives up the Presidency or goes full-on authoritarian.

*GASP* Could racism really be …. systemic?

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Even the methods used to combat racism are racist. O’Brien, an Afro-Latina woman entirely familiar with racism in America, is just “not shocked.” You can check someone’s privilege based on how surprised they are to learn that racism is systemic. 

We simply cannot.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Of the many excuses we hear for why folks voted and continue to support Trump, “economic anxiety” is the biggest excuse for condoning human rights violations and racism like we haven’t seen in a century. O’Brien followers lamented to have to add “fundraising while black” as a life-threatening task in America. Someone else used the GOP’s excuse used for white supremacist mass murderers: “That woman should not have access to video games. At all.”

When a former Navy SEAL trains dogs to “attack school shooters,” O’Brien sees into the future as adding dead dogs to the list of consequences of loose gun laws.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

“Anything but addressing the gun issues head-on. Dogs. Cats. Flying Squirrels,” comments one Twitter user. Someone else just perfectly encapsulated the dialogue between sensible gun reform advocates and NRA die-hards:

“People: Let’s regulate guns.
‘Merica: No! We’ll give teachers guns.
People: That would be super dangerous. Let’s regulate guns.
‘Merica: No! Backbacks that block bullets!
People: That would be very ineffective. Let’s regulate guns.
‘Merica: No! Dogs that attack shooters!”

Heads up that dogs are not immune to bullets, and shooters can just point downwards toward the dog.

O’Brien also has a special knack for mocking the not-so-newsworthiness of “news.”

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

For some reason, a video clip of Democratic Presidential Candidate Elizabeth Warren “running in Franconia, NH” went viral. “She has my vote” filled the comment thread. We have a feeling that O’Brien was likely commenting on how silly it is that watching a woman run is news.

She’s not here for people calling men brave for dealing with issues women always face.

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

Everyone in the comments is just shocked that this is even news. That anyone would think this man is anything but handsome. One commenter said that his wife wished he was as “ugly” as Simu Liu.

Also, RIP to the possibly-NOT-a-bot “Amazon Fulfillment Center Ambassador.”

Credit: @soledadobrien / Twitter

@AmazonFCBilly went on to say, “Because people are wondering, yes, Frank was a valued part of the discussion! His insights into the downsides of trade unionism were very valuable!” One person genuinely asked, “If you type this do they give you a bathroom break as a reward?”

We ran the account through bot.me and they’re not a bot. It might be a “Get Out” situation, but not a bot. Maybe O’Brien snapped them out of it. Either way, we’re loving these clapbacks and truth-telling. Gracias.

READ: Soledad O’Brien Mourns Her Cuban Mom’s Death Just 40 Days After Her Father Passes Away

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