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These Instagrammers Showed Their Family So Much Love With Their Día De Los Muertos Ofrendas

Día de los Muertos is a holiday filled with family, love, food and honoring all of the family members that came before you. It is a sweet holiday that is all about death but it is not sad or scary. Every year, millions of people around the world set up ofrendas for their dead relatives offering them food and drinks. The ofrenda is also a way for the family members to travel from the land of the dead into the land of the living to celebrate the holiday with everyone who is still alive. Ofrendas come in all shapes and sizes but one thing is consistent: love and family.

Not ever ofrenda has to be a massive installation in your living room.

Some times the best ofrendas are the ones that keep things simple and keep loved ones as the focus. This altar is all about showing love to a beloved puppers and the abuelitos and padres who are no longer here. ????

While food is important as an offering, some times you just have to add a little liquor for the party.

We all know that our abuelitos and padres enjoyed a few tragos in their day. Offering up some liquor for their special day in the land of the living is one way to show them love.

Pan de muerto is a good choice when creating your ofrenda.

Who doesn’t enjoy a little bread with their meal? This is also especially when it comes to a holiday.

Some people are coming together to honor those who have blazed paths in their industries.

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#writers #ofrenda

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The holiday is all about honoring those who have died and giving them some love. Don’t be shy away from adding your pioneers to the ofrenda. If they made an impact on your life, it might be worth giving them a lot of love.

Your altar can be as big as you want.

There is nothing wrong with reaching for the stars with your installation.

Or you can make them small enough to carry around to show everyone.

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This year, Gabriel had to make his first altar, so he dedicated it to his tío, Cesar Chavez. On it he put photos of his great-grandparents, his grandpa Richard Chavez (with his brother Cesar) as well as Cesar with Helen Chavez and Bobby Kennedy. The way that I was taught, día de los muertos has always been a way to reconnect to the past, and our family history. The truth is, Gabriel did a lot of the work (with assistance from mom and dad of course)- but he knows very well the history of the people behind the images. To him they are part of his living history. It was just last year at this time that we were traveling to Juchitan, Oaxaca. I wanted him to see the traditions as they meant to be celebrated- without the fanfare, but in their true essence. One year later, we begin to pass on the mantle of preserving our history and traditions to the next generation, because I'm the end Día de Los Muertos is equally about the living as it is about those who have taken the journey to Mictlan……#mictlan #diadelosmuertos #xandu #dayofthedead #cesarchavez #sisepuede #vivalavida #altar #ofrenda

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Cesar Chavez’s nephew is using his first every ofrenda to honor his uncle. It’s a touching tribute to a fierce civil rights activist who fought tirelessly for farmworkers in Delano, Calif.

Some towns and neighborhoods came together to create massive ofrendas to honor as many people as possible.

They can be major ofrendas to all the people who have recently died in the town or an offering to the patron saint of the city.

A lot of people prefer taking their altars directly to the cemeteries.

Some people prefer celebrating the holiday in their homes while others prefer going to the cemetery to be with their family. It’s one of the closest ways to feel really connected to your family.

Some people have altars dedicated to one of their most recently departed.

While there’s a lot of fuss made about including a lot of people on the altar, there is something special about using the holiday as a way to grieve. Everyone grieves in different ways and that means some people might use the holiday to come to terms with a recent loss.

Never forget the marigolds.

These flowers are crucial in leading your family to their altar. The flower is referred to as the “flower of the dead” and the scent is said to help spirits find their way to their altars.

Who are you honoring this year for Día de los Muertos?

Comment a photo below of your beautiful ofrendas.


READ: Selena’s Día De Los Muertos Altar At The Mexic-Arte Museum Has All Of Her Favorite Things

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People Are Claiming To See Frida Kahlo’s Ghost At Her Home And Museum In Mexico City Just In Time For Día De Muertos

Culture

People Are Claiming To See Frida Kahlo’s Ghost At Her Home And Museum In Mexico City Just In Time For Día De Muertos

Casa Azul / Museo Frida Kahlo / Google Arts & Culture

It’s been almost 70 years since the death of beloved artist and activist Frida Kahlo, who passed away in 1954 at just 47 years old. She remains to this day one of the world’s most famous and loved artists.

In fact, her former home is now a museum and one of Mexico’s most visited attractions. But after all these years is it possible that her spirit walks the Earth and is paying visits to those who venture inside her home?

That’s the rumor at the Frida Kahlo Museum in Mexico City, which is based in Casa Azul, the blue-walled home that Kahlo shared with her husband, Mexican muralist Diego Rivera.

There are persistent rumors about a ghostly presence at Casa Azul, Kahlo’s former home.

Mexico City’s Casa Azul – the former home and now museum of Frida Kahlo – is one of the city’s top destinations for visitors. Fans of the artist from around the world are drawn to the site to pay honor or tribute to one of the world’s most popular artists.

Kahlo meant so much to so many people that it makes sense people are now sharing stories of their unusually encounters while inside the museum.

A docent (who’s worked at the museum for 15 years) told me a Frida Kahlo ghost is rumored to wander the rooms of Casa Azul. While another similar testimonial was shared in a book by Ariana Davis, What Would Frida Do? A Guide to Living Boldly, a new life-advice book that channels the artist’s fearless spirit, boundless creativity, and tireless embrace of self-expression.

“Curators like to say that, sometimes, Frida returns to her old home after dark; her shape has been seen filling out corsets and skirts as if she’s borrowing her old clothing for the night,” Davis writes.

And these aren’t the only such tales of a possible ghost in the museum.

In an undated article published by the California website Southbay, Marlene Strang writes that “the museum’s director confided to us that on occasion, she has heard the sound of labored footsteps emanating from Frida’s office in the basement when no one was there. She also mentioned witnessing supernatural phenomena, such as the appearance of wet footprints on the grounds seemingly out of nowhere, but was quick to point out that her sense of Frida’s presence is benign, playful, and ever welcome.”

Even before these recent stories, there were long rumors surrounding the artist’s death.

One spooky story has long made the rounds surrounding the circumstances of Kahlo’s cremation. The long-standing legend has it that while her corpse was being cremated, Kahlo sat straight up amid the head and appeared to smile as her hair caught fire, creating a corona of flames around her head.

Although spooky, many are excited at the prospect of encountering Kahlo’s alleged ghost.

Credit: Casa Azul / Google Arts & Culture

Because her art was so deeply personal, it’s no wonder that her fans feel so closely connected to Kahlo that they’d welcome the chance to encounter her ghost. One Kahlo expert even had some advice as to how you might do just that.

“Frida is everywhere,” according to Mary-Anne Martin, who specializes in Mexican and Latin American art. “If you want to see her on the Day of the Dead you should leave her some good tequila. She’ll like that.”

But Frida’s Casa Azul isn’t the only allegedly haunted site in the city more the country.

Credit: omgitsjustintime / Instagram

Whether it’s terrifying tales of weeping murder victims or whispering mummies, Mexico has plenty to offer visitors in search of the macabre. In Mexico City near Xochimilco, you’ll find the now Instagram-famous Isla de Las Muñecas. Discolored plastic dolls hang from the branches of the island’s trees, many with missing heads or limbs and it’s considered to be one of the city’s most haunted places.

Also in Mexico City, the Posada del Sol, is largely thought to be haunted. One of the underground chambers of the hotel is believed to be haunted by the ghost of a young girl who was found dead in the building. The site is not open to the public but those who have ventured into the hotel often leave gifts of candy at an altar in order to avoid her curse.

But not all of the city’s haunted haunts are scary. Many locals believe that the Tasqueña station, on the city’s metro, is the spookiest spot. An elderly man reportedly haunts solo commuters waiting on the platform. But fear not – the ghost is said to be friendly. It is said that the man died during an assault at the station and is looking to protect passengers from a similar fate.

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There’s A Mobile Día De Muertos Ofrenda Traveling Around Southern California To Commemorate Victims Of Covid-19

Things That Matter

There’s A Mobile Día De Muertos Ofrenda Traveling Around Southern California To Commemorate Victims Of Covid-19

Jan Sochor / Getty Images

Every year around this time, many Latino families setup their ofrendas and set out pictures and objects belonging to their lost loved ones – in celebration of Día de Muertos.

However, this year’s celebrations are looking very different thanks to the global Coronavirus pandemic.

Not only have many families recently lost loved ones to the virus, they’re also struggling with ways to pay for the often extravagant celebrations as so many are left without work and income. Others are too afraid to gather with their families for fear that they may spread the virus to others. Meanwhile, in some cities, cemeteries (where many of the celebrations take place) have been closed to the public to avoid further contagion risk.

So, to help bridge that divide some communities are finding new and creative ways to help celebrate their lost loved ones amid the Covid-19 pandemic.

A mobile ofrenda will visit some of LA’s neighborhoods most affected by the pandemic.

Día de Muertos takes on a special meaning this year as a deadly pandemic continues to disproportionately affect Latino communities. And although traditional celebrations and events have been canceled, Latino Health Access (a nonprofit that advocates for the health of the local Latino community) plans to bring the celebration to the homes of those most impacted by the virus in Orange County to honor the deceased.

“Many of the events have been canceled, but we still want to honor those people who have passed away this year because of COVID,” Karen Sarabia, program associate for the Latino Health Access COVID-19 response team, told the LA Times.

The group along with a few local artists are converting a 28-foot flatbed truck into the altar, much like a float in the Rose Parade. Residents will be able to take photos with the altar. They can also provide offerings or write down the names of their loved ones and place them on the altar to honor the deceased. 

Ofrendas like this one are a central part of Día de Muertos celebrations.

Credit: Jan Sochor / Getty Images

Giovanni Vazquez, a local artist from Anaheim helping to construct the altar, spoke to the LA Times about the significance of the Day of the Dead. 

“I think it’s important because … this is how we remember all the dead and how we also celebrate the living,” Vazquez said, “This is how we remember that we’re going to go too. No matter which pandemic, no matter what cause, we are also going to die too.”

He continued: “We would like to share the art and try to make people think that death is also colorful and something we can celebrate … Just being thankful that we met the people in our life, even though they have passed, we remember them.”

According to the group, the ofrenda will have the basic components of classical altars in Mexico, where the tradition of Día de Muertos originated. There will be candles, thousands of paper flowers, sugar skulls and many offerings. 

There will be a prominent large skull and several smaller skulls with butterfly wings. Vazquez said those represent “the sacred migration of the living.” Monarch butterflies, which migrate to Mexico in November, are important symbols of Day of the Dead. 

The ofrenda and campaign is more important than ever as Latinos and other minority communities continue to suffer the worst effects of the pandemic.

Latino Health Access is organizing the event as part of the Latino Health Equity Initiative. Orange County launched the program in June in partnership with Latino Health Access after data revealed that the Latino community, particularly in Anaheim and Santa Ana, has taken the brunt of the pandemic in Orange County. 

The Los Angeles Times reported in late September that while Latinos make up 39% of the state’s population, they account for 61% of the state’s cases and 49% of COVID-19 deaths.

Anaheim is 56% Latino and Santa Ana is 77%. The cities account for about 36% of the county’s COVID-19 cases. 

Through the initiative, Latino Health Access is offering testing, outreach, education and referral services. 

California is not alone as cities from El Paso to Chicago create their own Día de Muertos celebrations to commemorate Covid-19 victims.

Credit: Alfonso Castillo Orta / Mexican National Art Museum

At the Mexican National Art Museum in Chicago, the museum has launched it’s exhibit memorializing Latinos who have died of the virus. “Sólo un Poco Aquí: Day of the Dead” honors people who have died from COVID-19 in Chicago and globally, said Antonio Parazan, director of education at the museum.

The exhibit is “paying tribute and remembering … the numerous individuals from our community … during this terrible pandemic,” he said. 

“We’ve had some of the highest number of infections … and a high number of deaths, as well,” Parazan said, noting Latino neighborhoods in Chicago have been among the hardest hit by coronavirus.

Even in Mexico – which has been one of the world’s hardest hit countries – officials are thinking of ways to merge traditional Día de Muertos celebrations with remembrances of Covid-19 victims.

In the town of Xalapa, families are taking photos with a giant Catrina, which is one fo the most iconic symbols of the holiday. And in Mexico City, the cities annual parade is going digital and will feature a special commemoration for Covid-19 victims.

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