relationships

This Mom Asked Her Trans Son About His Fears Of Growing Up Trans And His Question Is Heartbreaking

Credit: StoryCorps / Chris López and Gabe López

Meet Chris and Gabe López. This mother and son shared their story with StoryCorps. Gabe, who is transgender, was initially hesitant to tell his mom because he was, in his words, “worried that you liked me as a girl.”

He also describes how he met some “bros” at camp who taught him an extremely valuable life lesson lots of young boys take for granted.

But the most eye opening moment in the conversation between mother and son is when Chris asks Gabe about his future dreams and fears.

Chris: Do you ever get scared about what it’s going to be like to grow up transgender?

Gabe: I’ve been wondering if, when I’m older, a lot of people will to try to hurt me or something.

Chris: Like, if they find out that you were born a girl and they have a problem with it?

Gabe: Mmhmm.

Chris: You think that they might try to hurt you in some way?

Gabe: Yeah.

Give it a listen. Chris exemplifies the meaning of unconditional love for your child.


WATCH: These Queer And Trans Latinos Are Calling For Minority Groups To Unite And Fight Together

Were you ever scared to have a tough conversation with your parents? Did it turn out how you expected?

A 10-Year-Old Girl Sent Over 1,500 Art Kits To Kids Who Are Quarantining While In Foster Care

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A 10-Year-Old Girl Sent Over 1,500 Art Kits To Kids Who Are Quarantining While In Foster Care

@McDJohanne / Twitter

Talk about a girl with a big heart.

It turns out, kids have no qualms about leading the example when it comes to selflessness and kindness in today’s time of uncertainty. While so many of us bemoan our lack of access to entertainment, friends, and personal care, young generations are looking to offer support where they can. Just look at this 10-year-old from Danbury, Connecticut who understands the importance of empathy, compassion, and love during this time of quarantine.

She worked on a pretty big project to make sure kids her age felt all three.

Chelsea Phaire has spent her time in quarantine sending kits to more than 1,500 children in homeless shelters and foster care homes.

Phaire explained in a recent interview with CNN that she wanted to create the kits to give children something to look forward to and feel positive about. Phaire’s art kits include paper, coloring books, markers, crayons, and colored pencils. They are being sent to schools and shelters across the country as part of an organization founded by Phaire and her parents called Chelsea’s Charity.

“Since she was seven, she was begging me and her dad to start a charity,” Candace Phaire, Phaire’s mother, told CNN. “She was so persistent, every couple of months she would ask, ‘Are we starting Chelsea’s Charity yet?’ When she was turning 10, she asked us again, and we decided it was time to go for it.”

Set to enter the 6th grader this coming fall, Phaire and her parents launched Chelsea’s Charity on her birthday in August 2019.

At the time, Phaire asked party guests to donate art supplies to the charity instead of giving her birthday gifts. Soon after her birthday party, Phaire made the decision to use all of the donations she’d been given to send out her first 40 art kits. The kits were collected and sent to a homeless shelter in New York. It wasn’t long before Phaire and her parents set up an Amazon wishlist account for the art supplies.

Before the pandemic, Phaire and her mother delivered almost 1,000 kits to kids in foster care homes, homeless shelters, women’s shelters, and schools impacted by gun violence.

At the time, Phaire and her mother traveled around to give kids their kits in person. Since the start of the pandemic, however they’ve mailed the kits. “I feel good inside knowing how happy they are when they get their art kits,” Phaire explained. “I have definitely grown as a person because of this. Now my dream is to meet every kid in the entire world and give them art. Who knows, maybe if we do that and then our kids do that, we’ll have world peace!”

Black Mother, Amber Isaac, Tweeted Concerns About Hospital Care During Childbirth Before Her Death

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Black Mother, Amber Isaac, Tweeted Concerns About Hospital Care During Childbirth Before Her Death

GoFundMe

COVID-19 isn’t the only epidemic that should have you feeling alarmed. Across the globe, Black women continue to be mistreated, overlooked, and undervalued in the hallways of medical facilities and amongst medical professionals. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Black women are “three to four times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women.”

Described by some medical professionals as a public health and human rights emergency the increasing number of birth-related deaths amongst Black women are preventable.

Just like the death of Amber Isaac.

Isaac was a 26-year-old black, Puerto Rican New York mother-to-be who passed away on April 21st.

While news of her death began trending last week on social media, most major news outlets have failed to report on the young mother’s death which occurred at the Montefiore Medical Center in the Bronx. According to ESSENCE, Isaac’s death stemmed “from complications in delivering her son Elias who was born after midnight.” Isaac’s partner Bruce McIntyre, 28. In an interview about his partner’s death, McIntyre said that Isaac died less than four days after she’d tweeted about wanting to write an exposé on dealing with incompetent doctors.


Isaac, who died alone due to current measures to prevent the spread of the Coronavirus in hospitals, was pronounced dead due to complications with her cesarean section.

“All of this was 100% preventable. All of it,” McIntyre told The Guardian in an interview. “I feel like she would have got more attentive care if she was a white mother, to be completely honest with you.” According to The Guardian, McIntyre described Isaac’s pregnancy as being “riddled with neglect by rude and unprofessional staff at the Montefiore Medical Center,” who ignored Isaac even when she looked to them for help with her concerns during her final weeks of pregnancy.

Dr. Joia Crear-Perry, founder and president of the National Birth Equity Collaborative described Isaac to The Guardian as being a healthy woman who had done all that she was supposed to during her pregnancy. “And she’s not the only one. That’s the story of the black maternal mortality issue across the United States,” Dr. Crear-Perry said about Isaac.

According to the Guardian “In New York City, black women are nearly eight times more likely to die from pregnancy-related causes than white women. Latinas in the metropolis – especially Puerto Ricans – also face higher risks of life-threatening complications during childbirth.”

“Unfortunately, what I see when I look at Amber Rose’s case is a beautiful young woman who fell through our big, gaping hole of a healthcare system,” Crear-Perry told the outlet.

Isaac’s death has sparked an outcry over the unnecessary deaths of Black mothers online.

Friends and family of the late mother have created a GoFundMe page to help support Isaac’s son and to give her a funeral service.