politics

From New York To San Diego, These Candidates Are Standing Up For Their Latino Communities

ocasio2018 / ammarvel / Instagram

Seats in all level of government are up for grabs for the midterm elections and there are some new faces joining the world of politics. Candidates are out there running for state legislatures, seats in Congress and some governorships. However, before new candidates can compete to take these seats, they must first make it through the primary elections.

A primary election happens before the general to narrow down the field of candidates to two candidates, usually, who battle it out for the prize. Primary season began in March and will end in mid-September, depending on the state you live in.

As campaigning continues, we are beginning to see the candidates of color who are seeking change with progressive platforms. Let’s get to know the leaders of the next generation who represent the underrepresented.

Roza Calderon

Running for Congress to represent California’s 4th district, Roza Calderon, 32, wants to represent people’s needs over party interests. Hailing from Lincoln, California, Calderon is the daughter of a Salvadoran refugee and understands the importance of the American Dream. An activist for blue-collar families and geoscientist, Calderon’s platform includes combating climate change, promoting Medicare for All, and building an inclusive economy.

Part of her motivation stems from the lack of inclusive policies pushed by her opponents. In an interview with the Press Tribune, Calderon states, “I want to make sure that people have jobs. I want to make sure that people have the ability to negotiate fair wages and that’s really what I’m fighting for.” Calderon would become the first Latina representing California’s 4th district if elected.

Nelson Araujo

📷: @kellyfitzphoto

A post shared by Nelson Araujo (@nelsonaraujonv) on

Currently representing Nevada’s State Assembly District 3, Nelson Araujo, 31, is campaigning to be the next Nevada Secretary of State. His parents came to the U.S. from El Salvador to escape the Civil War in the 1980s. Araujo is motivated to run for Secretary of State because he believes Nevadans deserve a voting system that is just and protects the rights of every eligible voter. Araujo also states, “I believe an open government depends on fair elections and that will be my guiding principle in office.”

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, 28, is running to represent New York’s 14th congressional district. Born to a Puerto Rican family in the Bronx, Ocasio-Cortez continues to work with families of the Bronx and Queens as an educator, organizer and service worker. This has allowed her to learn more about the experience of everyday people, which inspired her to run for Congress.

One of Ocasio-Cortez’s main platform issues is banning super PACS to end the financial corruption at the expense of her community. Additional platform issues include paid sick and family leave, federal aid for Puerto Rico, and infrastructure renewal. Ocasio-Cortez would become the first Latina representing New York’s 14th district, if elected.

Ammar Campa-Najjar

Hailing from East County, San Diego, Ammar Campa-Najjar, 29, is running for Congress to represent California’s 50th district. He lived in San Diego before his family moved to Gaza as a child. However, Campa-Najjar, his brother and mother relocated back to San Diego after the war broke out. His working-class upbringing motivated him to run and give back to working families. Additional congressional interests include election reform, gun safety, and universal healthcare. Born to a Mexican-American mother and Palestinian father, Campa-Najjar could be the first Latino-Arab American to be elected to Congress.

Juana Matias

Born in the Dominican Republic and currently residing in the U.S., Juana Matias, 30, is running for Congress to represent Massachusetts’ 3rd district. Matias states on her website that her family pushed her to go to college before she eventually pursued law school. She worked her way to becoming Massachusetts’s first Latina State Representative. Matias understands what communities face firsthand, especially at a time when the American Dream is under attack. Matias’s platform includes the fight for a better education, the protection of immigrant rights, and the creation of quality jobs. In a video posted on her Facebook account, Matias states, “To me, politics is personal because we’re talking about people’s lives.” She would become the first Latina and immigrant representing Massachusetts’ 3rd district if elected.

Sam Jammal

Sam Jammal, 36, is running for Congress to represent the 39th district of California. Raised by immigrant parents from South America and the Middle East, Jammal saw his parents sacrifice many things in order for him and his siblings to have a better life. Jammal has a message on his website that states, “We need leaders who can stand up and fight to make sure our government gets back to the basics and represents our best interest.” His platform issues include fighting for LGBTQ and women’s rights and honoring veterans. He could become the first Latino-Arab American in Congress or share the title with Ammar Campa-Najjar.

Amanda Renteria

California is searching for a new governor and Amanda Renteria, 43, intends to hold that elected position. She was born in the U.S. to a Mexican father and American-born mother, both former farmworkers. Renteria received her degrees from Stanford and Harvard. She was the first Latina Chief of Staff of the U.S. Senate and now she is ready to take on her opponents in the race for governor of California. Renteria’s gubernatorial platform includes access to clean air and water, freedom from harassment and discrimination, and preparing children for the 21st century economy. Her goal is to make politics about people again. Renteria would become the first woman and Latina as California governor.

What you need to know. And what you can do.

You can make a difference. The most crucial act you can take during the primary elections is to vote. Not only can it create diversity in politics, but it can also lead to more equitable policies for underrepresented communities. Learn more about all candidates running in your state and remember to vote during the primary elections!

  • California – June 5, 2018
  • Nevada – June 12, 2018
  • New York –  June 26, 2018
  • Massachusetts – September 4, 2018

READ: We Spoke With Ammar Campa-Najjar, The First Latino-Arab Running For Congress

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!

A Georgia Gubernatorial Candidate Is Campaigning With His "Deportation Bus"

politics

A Georgia Gubernatorial Candidate Is Campaigning With His “Deportation Bus”

@williamsforga / Twitter

A Republican Georgia state senator is beginning his race for governor by taking a peculiar route in the form of a bus he calls the “Deportation Bus Tour.” Sen. Michael Williams, who was his state’s co-chair for President Donald Trump’s presidential campaign, is touting a school bus that will drive across the state of Georgia and will bring awareness to his campaign’s strong push against illegal immigrants.

The “deportation bus” tour has covered the state Georgia leading up to the primary voting today.

The bus didn’t really round up any undocumented immigrants. The campaign tactic follows the GOP party’s hard stance on illegal immigration that has only strengthened since President Trump took office.

Williams is one of five Republicans vying for the GOP nomination in Georgia’s upcoming governor’s race, is taking his stance against illegal immigration to another level. The bus is labeled with the words “Murderers, rapists, kidnappers, child molestors, and other criminals on board.” and “Follow me to Mexico.”

Coincidentally the bus ran into a bit of a bump on the road as it broke down the first week on its tour through Georgia.

The bus stopped on the side of Interstate 75 in Calhoun, Georgia  after water entered the fuel tank. His campaign spokesman, Seth Weathers said the bus had been fixed after a few hours on the side of the road.

Williams has run a campaign on the basis of cracking down on illegal immigration at all costs.

“We’re not just going to track them and watch them roam around the state,” Williams says in his political ad on Youtube. “We’re going to put them on this bus and send them home.”

The video was removed from YouTube for violating its policy on hate speech, just a day after it debuted.

Williams focused the beginning of his bus tour in a few Georgia cities known for being welcoming towards immigrants.

Williams was met with about 300 protestors in Clarkston, Georgia.where he was supposed to speak about his immigration plans. He was deterred by chants of “No hate! No fear! Immigrants are welcome here.” The senator targeted “sanctuary cities” across the state with the bus until the day before the state primary on May 22.

The campaign tactic follows a week of attacks on Latinos and immigrants from the President to a New York lawyer.

From President Trump’s comments on immigrants calling them “animals’ to a New York lawyers racist attack on two Latino women speaking Spanish, it’s been a long week for Latinos that have had to endure racial discrimination from across the United States.


READ: This Republican’s Campaign Team Created A Meme Attacking Emma Gonzalez’s Cuban Flag Patch

Share this story by clicking the share button below!

Paid Promoted Stories