politics

Trump Lists The 3 Requirements He Deems Necessary For The New Bill That Is To Replace DACA, And People On The Internet Are Concerned About The Funds

This Tuesday, January 9th, a federal judge from California ordered the Trump administration to partially reinstate the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival Program (DACA) program allowing for renewals, but not for any new applications. The ruling came hours after a heated negotiations meeting was held amongst members of the House and Senate to discuss a possible bipartisan solution for the program.

U.S. District Judge William Alsup ruled in favor of safeguards against deportation yesterday.

Alsup’s decision partially blocks the Trump Administration from ending protection to roughly 690,000 immigrants of the Obama-era immigration program. The federal judge also ordered the government to continue to accept DACA renewal applications until the members of the House and Senate are able to come to a final decision on the program.

In the lead-up to Judge Alsup’s decision, Trump scrambled to compromise with bipartisan lawmakers.

CREDIT: WASHINGTON POST / YOUTUBE

For more than an hour, the president convened with over two dozen members of the House and Senate to find a potential resolution for DACA. During the meeting, Trump laid out his requirements for any new bill meant to replace DACA. Trump called for a bill that would provide border security and a wall. He also underlined the Republican Party’s request for a bill that would put an end to both “chain migration” and visa lotteries.

Held just days after Trump declared his status as a “very stable genius,” the meeting put the president’s tangled understanding of immigration policy on full display.

At one point during the meeting, a Republican representative told Trump “You need to be clear.”

After Californian Democrat, Senator Dianne Feinstein, encouraged Congress to pass a clean DACA bill first and then move onto a “comprehensive immigration reform procedure” Trump surprised Republicans by agreeing. “I would like that,” he said. “I think a lot of people would like to see that.”

Representative Kevin McCarthy quickly cut into the conversation to ensure Trump had not agreed to a deal that excluded the Republican party’s push for a wall and increased border security. It’s a policy the president has staunchly maintained since his early campaign days.

Alsup expressed concern for DACA recipients later that evening after Trump’s meeting.

In his decision, Alsup argued that putting an end to the program would ultimately cause DACA recipients irreparable harm. “Plaintiffs have clearly demonstrated that they are likely to suffer serious irreparable harm absent an injunction,” Alsup wrote. “Before DACA, individual plaintiffs, brought to America as children, faced a tough set of life and career choices turning on the comparative probabilities of being deported versus remaining here. DACA gave them a more tolerable set of choices, including joining the mainstream workforce.”

According to the Washington Post, the ruling gives those who had been recipients of DACA before Sep. 5, 2017 the ability to renew their DACA status. For now, no new DACA applications will be accepted.

You can find the detailed court case on this decision here.


READ: Congress Will Be Confronted With Stories From DACA Recipients Every Day Until The Holiday Break Because Of This Jumbotron


Don’t forget to hit the share button below and spread this information to DACA recipients you may know. 

Trump Ends Temporary Protected Status For Salvadorans. Here’s What That Means

politics

Trump Ends Temporary Protected Status For Salvadorans. Here’s What That Means

Peg Hunter / Flickr

The Trump administration recently announced its plan to terminate the Temporary Protected Status of approximately 200,000 Salvadorans currently living in the United States, all but guaranteeing that many will face deportation.

CREDIT: Protesters at an Oakland rally to defend TPS for Salvadorans and many others at risk. Photo credit: Peg Hunter / Flickr

Temporary Protected Status (TPS) is granted by the secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to eligible foreign-born individuals who cannot return to their birth country safely because of conditions or circumstances that can cause them harm. TPS was granted to Salvadorans after earthquakes ravaged El Salvador in 2001, and their permits have been renewed on an 18-month basis since that time.

DHS said that TPS for Salvadorans will end on Sept. 9, 2019, stating that conditions that led to the original designation are no longer applicable.

“Based on careful consideration of available information, including recommendations received as part of an inter-agency consultation process, the secretary determined that the original conditions caused by the 2001 earthquakes no longer exist,” the DHS statement read.

This move reinforces the Trump administration’s hard-line stance on foreigners living in the country. It has already ended the TPS designation for Nicaraguans, Haitians, and Sudanese, while offering short-term extensions for Hondurans and South Sudanese.

Adding insult to injury, Trump referred to El Salvador, Haiti, and African nations as “shithole countries” in a meeting with lawmakers last Thursday.

CREDIT: Photo credit: Peg Hunter / Flickr

The comment sparked global outrage and has caused a case of he said-he said between the two political parties. Sen. Dick Durban (D-Ill.), who attended the meeting, confirmed that Trump used that language, while Republican Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue said they “do not recall” the president saying those specific comments.

Trump denies using the term “shithole” and told reporters over the weekend that he is the “least racist person you have ever interviewed.” The most recent reports add a perplexing, but nonetheless troubling, twist: Cotton and Perdue, according to three White House sources, believe Trump said “shithouse” rather than “shithole.”

Regardless of the exact syntax, hundreds of thousands of lives now hang in the balance. According to DHS officials, 262,500 Salvadorans have received TPS permits. These individuals will have nearly two years to either leave the United States on their own or apply for a green card. However, the convoluted and backlogged U.S. immigration system will likely make the latter all but impossible.

Democrats, immigration advocates, and Salvadoran government officials have condemned this decision, calling on DHS Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen to extend the designation due to El Salvador’s growing gang violence.

The Economist reports that El Salvador was ranked as the world′s most violent country, and its capital, San Salvador, the city with the most murders in both 2015 and 2016.

What’s more, El Salvador is struggling to provide economic opportunities for its citizens who currently live there. An influx of new residents could prove problematic. Jeannette Aguilar, who operates a public polling center at Central American University in San Salvador, tells the LA Times that mass U.S. deportations would negatively affect the country’s economy and further compromise security.

“Without a doubt this will be a crisis of grand dimensions,” Aguilar said.

In the U.S., many Salvadorans are worried about losing everything they’ve established – families, businesses, careers, and communities. In a statement, the Service Employees International Union (SEIU) California called the decision “senseless.”

“Our communities will be dealt a serious blow when families are broken apart, when parents and children are separated, and when we see the near simultaneous layoffs of 200,000 Salvadoran TPS recipients currently employed, costing employers nearly $1 billion in immediate turnover costs,” said David Huerta, president of SEIU United Service Workers West (USWW). “We are losing invaluable workers thoroughly vetted by the government, we are losing mothers and fathers who are working to provide the best for their families, and neighbors who have invested in their communities.”


She Didn’t Know Her Rape Led To A Pregnancy. Now, Her Stillbirth Has Landed Her A 30-Year Jail Sentence In El Salvador

Will you and your family be affected by the termination of TPS? Tell us about it in the comments! We want to share your story.

Paid Promoted Stories