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After Doctors Released This Patient In Venezuela, He Went On To Kill And Eat At Least 10 People

Televes / Manuel Fariñas / YouTube

Dorángel Vargas is a diagnosed paranoid schizophrenic responsible for killing and cannibalizing at least 10 people in Venezuela during the late ’90s. His crimes were so shocking and prolific that he received the nickname, El Comegente (The People Eater). Here’s the story of Venezuela’s most notorious serial killer.

Dorángel “El Comegente” Vargas kept the city of San Cristóbal in Venezuela in fear from 1997 to 1999.

CREDIT: Televes / Manuel Fariñas / YouTube

The homeless man lived in one of the city’s parks and over the course of his rampage attacked, killed and ate 10 men. Some sources have Vargas’ victim count at up to 40 people, but he only confessed to and was convicted of 10 of the murders.

Vargas’ first victim was Cruz Baltazar Moreno in 1995.

Police were able to capture and detain Vargas after he killed Moreno. After his capture, police took the serial killer to a psychiatric facility for testing and counseling, according to Notimerica.

While in custody at the facility, Vargas was diagnosed as a paranoid schizophrenic.

After two years in the facility, Vargas was released after doctors were convinced that the soon-to-be serial killer was not a threat to society.

However, the same year he was released from the psychiatric hospital, Vargas claimed his first victim.

CREDIT: Televes / Manuel Fariñas / YouTube

Vargas would continue to kill and eat people over the next two years. His victims were either athletic people he was able to surprise with a blow to the head, or drunk people that passed out in the park where he lived. Vargas was caught after the bodies of his victims were discovered near where he was living.

The serial killer gave chilling interviews after his capture, detailing how he chose his victims and what body parts he would eat.

CREDIT: Televes / Manuel Fariñas / YouTube

In one interview, Vargas explained that he didn’t not eat his victim’s feet because they gave him indigestion. But he did compare eating humans to eating fruit.

“Have you eaten pears?” he asked one reporter. “Right, it’s the same. Eating people is like eating pears.”

Last year, Vargas was accused of killing and eating a fellow inmate during a prison riot.

According to Telegraph, the families of two men imprisoned in the facility as Vargas claim that their loved ones were dismembered and eaten by Vargas during a riot. The stories were confirmed by officers that worked in the prison through anonymous sources. Allegedly, a gang killed members of a rival gang and asked Vargas to dismember their victims, as reported by Reuters. After the dismembering, Vargas ate some of the victims while the rest of the men killed were cooked and served to the rest of the inmates. Officials were looking into those claims but Venezuela was heading towards its current economic and political crisis. Nothing has since been reported about the investigation.

El Comegente became such a part of pop culture that Bacalao Men wrote a song dedicated to his story.


READ: Here’s How An East LA Neighborhood Brought Down One Of America’s Most Notorious Serial Killers

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A Venezuelan Man Is Instagramming His 1,118 Mile Walk To Educate Everyone On What Is Really Happening In Venezuela

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A Venezuelan Man Is Instagramming His 1,118 Mile Walk To Educate Everyone On What Is Really Happening In Venezuela

laordendemiranda / Instagram

Living in Trump’s America, there’s no shortage of causes that people should know about. Whether you’re fighting for immigration rights, women’s rights, voting rights, healthcare for all, or the environment, there’s truly a cause for everyone. The problem is if you care about all of these things, you will undoubtedly get burned out, which is why it’s essential to stick with one thing and put your heart into it. That’s what we’re learning from Miguel Galindo, a man walking from Doral, Florida to Washington to bring attention to the crisis in Venezuela.

Thirty-four-year-old Miguel Galindo is walking 1,100 miles from Florida to Washington to bring attention to the crisis in Venezuela.

Instagram/@laordendemiranda

Some may think there’s no way Galindo’s walk will bring any kind of change to the country, which is currently under tremendous turmoil within its government and the people.

“I am clear that by hiking from here to Washington, I am not going to remove Nicolás Maduro from power,” Galindo said to NBC News. “What I am trying to do is to add to the fight, add other Latino brothers and sisters, add other American brothers and sisters.”

He’s documenting the entire journey on his Instagram.

Instagram/@laordendemiranda

He launched his project walk earlier this month and is keeping all of his followers (more than 270K) up to date on what’s going on. He posts videos regularly showing the people helping him along his journey and showing his progress as he walks along with the route crossing six states.

He has reached out to help him on his walk to Washington.

“I can count on my Venezuelan brothers and sisters who have already offered me their homes, they have offered to pay for hotel stays, and I have also planned to sleep on the beach,” he tells NBC News.

Here’s what he’s taking on his trip — it’s not a lot either.

Instagram/@laordendemiranda
  • a large backpack
  • shirts
  • pants
  • socks
  • cell phones
  • chargers

The rest, he said, people will mail him to various spots on his route.
What’s really great about this story is that a person who wants to do something for his home country but cannot because he is not there shows that you still can help regardless of how far away you are.

Galindo is walking from Doral, Florida to Washington to honor the Venezuelan refugees who have had no choice but to walk out of their country for safety.

The crisis in Venezuela has been devastating the country and the people for years. As time passes, things in the country continue to deteriorate and people are forced to flee their homeland on foot for safety and freedom. Millions of Venezuelans have been left with no choice but to leave their homes and families behind to escape the collapsing country.

The young man wants to educate people about what is happening in Venezuela and the cause of the strife in the country.

According to his first video, Galindo wants people to know that President Trump is not the cause of the situation in Venezuela. He is also taking a stand against Venezuelan President Nicolás Maduro and placing the blame for the crisis in his hands. He has also used his platform to let everyone who is listening know that Venezuelan Interim-President Juan Guiadó is simply fighting against the Maduro regime to restore democracy in Venezuela.

His friends have taken to social media to continue to express why the walk is happening.

First and foremost, they state they are not doing this as part of any political party or ideology. Instead, they are doing it as proud Venezuelans trying to save their country. As far as they are concerned, they are walking to Washington to fight for Venezuela, not any political ideology.

The walk is still going and mitú will update our report as the walk continues. Buena suerte, Galindo.

READ: The Crisis In Venezuela Is Worsening. Here’s What You Should Know Right Now

A Nurse Stepped Up To Help After This Photo Drew Attention To The Humanitarian Crisis In Venezuela

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A Nurse Stepped Up To Help After This Photo Drew Attention To The Humanitarian Crisis In Venezuela

El Nuevo Herald

When an image of a malnourished Venezuelan child was shown in a New York Times article, there was an immediate reaction. The image made headlines across the internet. Whether it was the visual representation of the humanitarian crisis happening in Venezuela or the sheer shock of a starving child, it got people’s attention. Specifically, Fabiola Molero, a nurse within a Roman Catholic aid group, Caritas.

This image highlighted the reality of what’s happening in Venezuela as food prices have doubled and hunger has become a major issue for many.

Anailin Nava is just two years old and was suffering from severe malnutrition due to lack of food and medicine. Making things worse was Nava having a genetic neurological disease, which causes convulsions and muscular problems.

Her ailments make eating and digesting a difficult task for the young child. Her family can’t afford to feed her more than once a day and, when they do, it is rice or cornmeal.

The image was enough to convince Molero to make the journey to the western city of Maracaibo to Toas Island, where Nava lives. Molero, who had been a nurse for the past 20 years, quit three years ago and became a volunteer with Caritas. She did this so she could help people like situations like Nava’s and fight the hunger epidemic that’s devastating Venezuela.

“I worked in a hospital and quit because I couldn’t handle the fact that children were dying in my arms for lack of food,” Molero told the New York Times.

So she packed nutritional supplements like milk and food and hitchhiked from the western city of Maracaibo to Toas. She set off with a mission to help the young girl and others just like her in the community.

The state of Zulia, which Toas is part of, has seen some of the worst effects of the country’s economic fall.

The island is at a huge disadvantage when it comes to resources like food and aid. It’s also been practically removed from the mainland after boats that were used as public transport broke down recently.

According to Anailin’s mother, Maibeli, the little aid that comes by from the government arrives every five months. Yet, that doesn’t last very long as they are consumed by families in less than a week.

This has been the result of unsustainable inflation the country has seen recently that has seen food prices double. Nine out of 10 Venezuelans do not feel they have sufficient resources to buy food which has left many people like Nava malnourished.

Since Molero has arrived, she’s helped Nava and other children in the neighborhood with basic nutrients and food.

“My baby had deteriorated and was in a very bad state,” Maibeli who is 25, told the New York Times. “I thought my daughter was going to die. She didn’t even give me her hand when I tried playing with her.”

Maibeli says that the nurses help made an immediate difference to her daughter’s health. But there are still concerns for her and other young children on the island that face similar situations.

Out of 26 children examined by Molero, 10 weren’t eating enough. Almost all of had blisters and abscesses in their skin most likely caused by poor water conditions.

The image provoked an immediate response from people around the world wanting to help Venezuela.

The image, which first appeared in the New York Times on May 17th, prompted a wide response from people wanting to help.

One user said, “how can I help 2-year-old Anailin Nava?”. Another asked, “there any way to help Maibeli Nava and her daughter Anailin?”

While other volunteers are expected to come to Toas, there is still a need for more help. Basic items for babies like milk are of necessity, as well as gasoline to help deliver the food.

“The condition of our children gets worse every day,” Molero said. “We’re working by the strength of our nails here because we barely have any resources.”

Read: This Graphic Image Of A Venezuelan Mother Carrying Her Daughter’s Dead Body To A Morgue Amidst The Country’s Massive Blackout Has Social Media Users Heartbroken

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