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No Pos Wow: Teen Arrested After Buying A Tiger Cub In Mexico, Brazil Opens Part Of The Amazon For Mining, And More

U.S. Customs And Border Protection / David Evers / Flickr

In today’s world, the news happens so fast that it’s nearly impossible to keep up with the latest, breaking developments. Here are five quick headlines to keep you updated on the stories that might have gotten lost in the shuffle this week.

U.S. retailers have seen a steady decline in Latinos spending money on nonessentials since President Trump won the election.

NBC News reported this week that many U.S. retailers, including O’Reilly Automotive and Target, have seen significant slumps in earnings following the election of President Donald Trump last November. According to CEOs from various companies, the downturn in business has been noticed more along the border and in Latino-dominated neighborhoods. According to NBC News, it’s because Latinos, especially undocumented Latinos, are afraid of being profiled and harassed by immigration officials and local law enforcement. Industries such as footwear have seen some of the most significant drops in Latino spending. NBC News reports that Latino spending power reached $1.4 trillion dollars in 2016 and companies have spent years trying to court more Latino customers.

“People are squirreling money away and don’t want to leave their houses to go to stores,” Eric Rodriguez, the Vice President, Office of Research, Advocacy, and Legislation for UnidosUS, told NBC News.

Read More: US Retailers Hit As Immigration Worries Weigh On Hispanic Spending

New travel warnings have been issued for Mexico but experts say they shouldn’t be cause for alarm.

The U.S. Department of State has updated their travel warning for U.S. citizens traveling to Mexico. The report cites an increase in violent crimes in many popular tourist destinations but State Department officials are saying that Americans should not get overly concerned if visiting the country. The warning mentions cities Playa del Carmen, Cancun, and Tulum, which are popular tourist destinations. The report states that some violence between rival gangs and organized criminal entities has been taken to the streets in broad daylight but there is no evidence that Americans have been targeted specifically because of their nationality.

“[The] Mexican government dedicates substantial resources to protect visitors to major tourist destinations,” State Department spokesperson Pooja Jhunjhunwala told Condé Nast Traveler.

“As the travel warning explains, there have been situations among individuals involved in criminal activities,” a spokesperson for Mexico’s Tourism Board told Condé Nast Traveler. “We can add that the overwhelming majority of those incidents have taken place in locations not frequented by international tourists (such as inner-city areas or private properties).”

Read More: Mexico Travel Warning: What the Update Means for Travelers

An American teenager tried smuggling a Bengal tiger cub he bought in Mexico into the U.S.

An 18-year-old man from California has been arrested for trying to smuggle a Bengal tiger into the United States from Mexico. According to The Washington Post, U.S. Customs and Border Protections inspected Luis Eudoro Valencia’s car as he was crossing the border into San Diego, Calif. from Tijuana, Mexico. During the search, they found the tiger cub on the passenger side floor board and the teenager told them that he bought the tiger for $300 from a man in Tijuana. The man who sold him the tiger, according to the teen, was walking a full grown tiger on a leash. Valencia has been released on $10,000 bond and will have a hearing in front of a federal court Sept. 5. If convicted, Valencia could face up to 20 years in prison, according to The Washington Post.

“CBP officers are often faced with unusual situations,” Pete Flores, the director of field operations for Customs and Border Protection in San Diego, told The Washington Post.

Read More: Teen Tells Judge He Bought Tiger Cub On Streets Of Mexico

Climate change has turned a Bolivian village into a ghost town as residents flee.

Inside Climate News has reported that a village in Bolivia, which can be dated back to pre-Inca times, is on the brink of losing all of its residents following a record breaking drought. The village was once thriving because of the quinoa boom but the drought has left the fields and lakes drying up. The Drought has forced 80 percent of the residents to leave the village and head to the cities in an attempt to find work.

“Before it was much stabler. Rain arrived in the rainy season. There was a time for wind, when the wind came. But now it’s not like that,” Justino Calcina, a resident of Santiago K, told Inside Climate News. “Our only sustenance in this town, and in this region, is—or was—quinoa.”

Read More: Climate Change Is Making This Bolivian Village a Ghost Town

Brazil has opened up protected Amazonian land for commercial mining to boost the economy.

In a move that has shocked many environmental activists, Brazilian President Michel Temer has opened a large region of the Amazon — it’s the size of Denmark — to commercial mining, according to The Guardian. Temer said the opening of the land will not impede on any environmental and indigenous protections that are in place but many remain skeptical about the move. It is reported that there are rich deposits of gold, copper, tantalum, iron ore, nickel and manganese.

“A gold rush in the region will create irreversible damage to local cultures,” Mauricio Voivodic, the executive director of World Wildlife Federation-Brazil, told The Guardian. “In addition to demographic exploitation, deforestation, loss of biodiversity and water resources, this could lead to an intensification of land conflicts and threats to indigenous peoples and traditional populations.”

Read More: Brazil abolishes Huge Amazon Reserve In ‘Biggest Attack’ In 50 Years


READ: No Pos Wow: A Dolphin Is Running For President In Chile, ‘Despacito’ Snubbed By MTV, And More

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13 Facts You Didn’t Know About Tajín

Culture

13 Facts You Didn’t Know About Tajín

Tajín is one of those things that you just don’t question. It’s just always existed–in someone’s purse, on the ring of your margarita, in savory and sweet treats alike. There are no rules when it comes to Tajín. It’s just been in the family since forever.

No matter how ubiquitous Tajín is in your pantry, purse, or every family photo on the mantle, we bet you didn’t know these facts about fruit’s favorite seasoning.

Tajín™ has blessed our people for nearly 35 years.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

But of course, like every other Mexican food company, the flavors are built off traditional Mexican flavors that have been around much longer. We all get to toast our Tajín-rimmed michelada’s to an abuela.

We owe *this* to an abuelita named Mama Necha.

@eloteslapurisima / Instagram

The story goes that Tajín founder Horacio Fernandez was just a boy when his abuela, Necha, would make her signature sauce. He would shout, “Mama Necha made her sauce!” That would set off alarms for friends and family to gather around the table.

Mama Necha would use seven different chiles to make the sauce.

@at_ghost / Instagram

Horacio specifically loved pouring the sauce over a fresh elote. His website describes the “Aha!” moment as “One day, as he delighted in the way the sauce ran down the sides of his corn cob he thought how wonderful it would be if there were a way for the whole world to taste this sauce.”

From then on, Horacio started developing a special process to dehydrate the limes and chiles.

@Elton_Osorio / Twitter

Horacio’s goal with Tajín wasn’t to recreate the exact sauce his abuela created. He wanted to preserve the quality and flavors of the sauce–in a dehydrated form.

Tajín is technically a “powdered sauce.”

@taerimasu / Twitter

It might say ‘seasoning’ on the bottle but, since it’s 1993 year of launch in the U.S. market, Tajín has been a pioneer in the “powdered sauce” category.

Horacio’s powdered his abuela’s recipe so that way he could bring the flavors everywhere he went.

@tajinusa / Instagram

It’s advertised as a way to spice up fruit and vegetables, but we’re all sneaking it’s miniature size into every movie theater like our mamis taught us. The trope that Latinos are spicy is probably because of tajín.

The name came after Horacio visited the Tajín archeological site in Veracruz.

@renistraveler / Instagram

Horacio was on a trip to delve further into Mexico’s rich history. He was mesmerized by the ruins of Tajín, and once he found out “aji” means chile in the Nahuatl language, it was all over for him. He launched his company and named it Tajín in 1985.

Every purchase of Tajín helps support the National School of Ceramics.

“Responsabilidad Social” Digital Image. Tajín. 21 June 2019.

Horacio wanted to make sure that his company did more to preserve Mexican culture. Tajín undoubtedly has made an impact to spread the culture globally, but what about at home?

The school is working to provide Bachelors, Masters and P.h.D. degrees, but for now it’s offering workshops and classes to preserve a cornerstone of Mexican arts.

The bottle label says “THIS IS NOT CANDY” for a reason.

@indulge_gourmetdesserts / Instagram

Apparently, children have been known to eat it straight from the bottle. The seasoning is made of seven different chiles, and, as good as it tastes going down, we imagine children’s tummies couldn’t quite handle it.

Tajín has become part of countless signature drink recipes.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

Granted, most of us just sprinkle Tajín onto every drink. The best micheladas and bloody marys are spiced up with Tajín.

The only covered strawberries Latinos want are chamoy and Tajín covered strawberries.

@sweettreatsbyjazz / Instagram

How good do these spicy strawberries look? Those are chamoy infusers🍓

Tajín leaves people feeling more body positive than before.

@tajinonthego / Instagram

One Tajín fan likes to use the varying size options as a reminder to stay bo-po. Her caption reads, “Just a friendly Tajín reminder to love yourself . We come in all shapes , colors, & sizes. ❤️🧡💛💚💙💜”

Tajín is completely allergen-free and Kosher.

@ashleyfozfit / Instagram

It’s safe for everyone, y’all! Spread the word–Tajín might not have been around B.C. but it’s going to be around for a long, long time.

Mexican Food Meets Japanese Food In These Next Level Mexican Sushi Creations

Culture

Mexican Food Meets Japanese Food In These Next Level Mexican Sushi Creations

plantpoweredchicana / Instagram

Yes, Mexican sushi is real and it’s not only delicious and creative; it is popular af.

Mexican sushi has already made its way into the United States thanks to Culichi Town, a sushi and seafood restaurant in Bell Gardens outside of Los Angeles. It helped bring the trend stateside from Sinaloa.

But Mexican sushi in Mexico is still where it’s at.

You might be wondering what could make sushi Mexican.

Well, it is still sushi with nori seaweed and Japanese rice, but with a Mexican twist. It includes ingredients such as jalapeño, avocado, beef steak, cream cheese, breaded shrimp, and Tampico salad – a crab or surimi-based salad with jalapeño pepper, onion, and mayonnaise.

Japanese-Mexican fusion works perfectly, and you shouldn’t be surprised.

At its core, it employs a spicy, crunchy, tangy, and creamy flavor-bomb approach, not unlike Mexican food in general. It stands in stark opposition to the romantic, Japanese, “less is more” school of thought that makes sushi chefs look like fine-dining artists.

Mexican sushi is everything that traditional sushi is not.

Credit: plantpoweredchicana / Instagram

Mexican sushi is all about creative combinations that might not seem to make sense on the menu, but are truly delicious. Some of the options include grilled chicken and beef. My guess is that they are alternatives for those who wish to steer clear from raw seafood.

And in Mexico City, there are a ton of amazing Mexican sushi restaurants with some pretty insane options. Let’s start with Sushi Roll:

Credit: sushirollmx / Instagram

Sushi Roll is one of the largest sushi chain restaurants in the city. They have more than 20 locations. It’s especially popular because they have amazing specials including a 2×1 sushi promotion on Monday-Wednesday and a 2×1 drink special on Thursday.

But their sushi is amazing too!

Check out their Monkey Roll…

Credit: sushirollmx / Instagram

Wrapped in banana, topped with chipotle, crowned with fried chile, and stuffed with cream cheese.

And their tasty tropical-inspired Samba Roll.

Credit: sushirollmx / Instagram

This roll comes wrapped in mango and is topped with a tropical flavored pico de gallo.

Then there’s also Teikit, another beloved Mexico City sushi chain.

Credit: teikitoficial / Instagram

They offer 2×1 specials every night of the week and have a giant menu with some really good Mexican-Japanese fusion.

For example, take a look at these Mexican Sushi Pizzas…

Credit: teikitoficial / Instagram

They even have a nori seaweed base and come topped with a mix of Italian, Mexican, and Japanese toppings. Like how extra is that?!

And you can’t miss the kushiage…

Credit: teikitoficial / Instagram

These tasty fried skewer things are amazing and these ones come filled with manchego cheese, banana, and jalapeno! Sounds like a totally weird combination but trust, it works.

They even have a veggie roll with roots in pre-Hispanic foods!

Credit: teikitoficial / Instagram

I mean quinoa dates back thousands of years, long before the arrival of the Spanish – so shout out to Teikit to offering some truly ‘back to your roots’ foods.

There’s even a brand new Mexican sushi restaurant on the scene and it’s taking Mexico City by storm with its wild inventions.

Credit: @ChilangoCom / Twitter

I mean sushi de pastor, with beans, and esquites? Could this be legit?

First, they got some amazing looking cocktails.

Credit: sushin_gonzalez / Instagram

Like this one called the Mekishiko, which is a mezcal cocktail flavored with tamarindo.

And the tempuchepe roll is apparently one of the most popular sushi rolls in the city right now.

Credit: sushin_gonzalez / Instagram

This roll comes fried and filled with onions and grilled beef, crema, and salsa macha. Wow.

Many of their rolls are inspired by a Mexican state. Like this one from Hidalgo.

Credit: sushin_gonzalez / Instagram

Called the Atlantepu, this roll comes fried (I’m sensing a theme) and filled with potatoes and peppers, drizzled with crema, and topped with a cilantro salsa. Not bad.

Or do you prefer beans with your sushi?

Credit: sushin_gonzalez / Instagram

Don’t worry, they’ve got you covered with this roll. It also comes fried, filled with black beans, manchego cheese, grilled pork, and a pasilla chile dressing.

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