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A Cuban-American Man And Mexican Woman Led One Of The Most Violent Satanic Cults In The 1980s

Satanic cults with a pension for ritualistic killings have long existed in the terrified imaginations of people around the world. They exist in urban legend but rarely are they proven to be real. However, one such cult did exist in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico, and they would go on to claim 15 lives between 1986 and 1989. The cult was led by Cuban-American Aldofo Constanzo and Mexican Sara Aldrete. Among their victims is Mark Kilroy, an American pre-med student at the University of Texas at Austin. Kilroy was down in Mexico with friends for Spring Break when he was kidnapped and murdered by the cult in one of their final ritualistic murders. Here’s the story of the gang dubbed Los Narcosatánicos.

Sara Aldrete and Adolfo Constanzo led a bloodthirsty, drug smuggling Satanic cult in the 1980s in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

In 1989, Constanzo and Aldrete were 26 and 24, respectively, when police figured out that the two were behind a string of killings dating back to 1986.

Constanzo was a Cuban-American born and raised in Miami by a practicing santera.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

Constanzo followed in his mother’s footsteps and began practicing  santería. As he got older, Constanzo dabbled with darker, more extreme forms of witchcraft and satanic worship. It wasn’t long until he began to explore a dark side of Palo Mayombe, a form of santería with roots in the Congo.

Aldrete is a Mexican national born in Matamoros who was a student at Texas Southmost College at the time of the murders.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

Aldrete had dated Constanzo before he came out to her as gay, according to former Brownsville Deputy Sheriff George Gavito. Rolling Stone reports that it was only after meeting Aldrete that Constanzo’s violence against random people began to escalate.

Aldrete and Constanzo formed the cult that came to be called Los Narcosatánicos. They operated just across the river from Brownsville, Texas, smuggling drugs and killing people in sacrificial rituals.

CREDIT: Google Maps

According to The New York Times, Los Narcosatánicos claimed that by performing the ritualistic killings the group would be protected from the police. Members of the cult also told authorities that Constanzo, known to them as El Padrino (The Godfather), said the killings would make them invincible to bullets.

The streets of Matamoros, a popular destination for college students, proved to be a good place to find victims for the cult.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

Many college students would venture into Matamoros for Spring Break and long weekends. The drinking age was lower than the U.S. and getting into Matamoros from Brownsville was easy to do on foot.

It was the disappearance of The University of Texas at Austin pre-med student, Mark Kilroy, that would eventually bring the cult down.

Mark Kilroy was in Matamoros in March 1989 during Spring Break. According to PEOPLE Magazine, Kilroy was staying with three friends in South Padre Island, Texas, about 20 miles from the U.S.-Mexico border. On the first night of their stay, the friends made their way into Matamoros for a night of drinking and celebration. That first night ended without incident and the four friends made their way back to their lodging. March 14, 1989, their second night out in Matamoros, would be a fateful night. After drinking until 2 a.m., Kilroy and his friends started walking back to the border. Their car was parked on the U.S. side. The group walked in twos, with Kilroy and his friend, Bill Huddleston, lagging behind.

During the walk, Rolling Stone reports that Huddleston ventured off to pee, leaving Kilroy alone on the street. When he returned, Kilroy was gone. Huddleston reunited with the two other men on the trip. When they didn’t hear from Kilroy the next morning, they knew something was wrong and went to the police.

Four weeks after Kilroy went missing, Mexican authorities had a break in the case.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

In early April, police apprehended Elio Hernandez Rivera, 22 at the time, for running through a police checkpoint with marijuana in his possession. Hernandez Rivera told the police names of different drug dealers and even led them to Rancho Santa Elena where the cult carried out their murders, according to Rolling Stone. At first, the authorities believed they were on a drug bust but after showing Hernandez Rivera a photo of Kilroy, things took a sickening turn. Hernandez Rivera confirmed that Kilroy had been to the property and was buried there.

Four cult members assisted the police in uncovering the bodies of the cult’s victims who were buried in Rancho Santa Elena.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

In the case of Kilroy, the first thing found was his brain, which was found in a black cauldron after having been boiled in blood with a turtle, spinal column and a horseshoe. Hernandez Rivera told authorities that Constanzo, who had named him second-in-command, told the cult to abduct an Anglo for the ritual to achieve the necessary outcome. Kilroy was lured away by a man who spoke English and was pulled into a truck and driven to the ranch.

Police learned that Kilroy was killed with a single machete blow to the back of the head.

The New York Times notes that Kilroy tried to escape after 12 hours in captivity and was killed by Constanzo in retaliation for his trying to escape. Kilroy was then dismembered and used in a sacrificial ritual to further protect the cult from police and physical injury. On Rancho Santa Elena, Constanzo set up one of the buildings was set up as a shrine to the murder of his victims. In disgust, the shrine was burned by authorities.

In total, the cult claimed 15 lives from the U.S. and Mexico.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

Most were dismembered and brutalized after their death. The discovery of the bodies sent residents of Matamoros into a panic as rumors of retaliation spread, according to Rolling Stone. There was a fear that cult members would take their revenge by abducting children for their human sacrifices, but no such abductions occurred.

Two weeks after Rancho Santa Elena was discovered and investigated, police learned about Constanzo’s Mexico City hideout. They surrounded it and a shootout ensued.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

Once Constanzo knew that the police had surrounded his apartment building in Mexico City, he snapped. He burned money on the stove and started throwing money out of the window while shooting at passersby. Police returned fire and quickly advanced into the apartment to put an end to Los Narcosatánicos.

In his last act against police, Costanzo ordered he and his boyfriend killed.

CREDIT: Mily Martell / YouTube

Rolling Stone says Aldrete denies having any knowledge of the killings that took place at Rancho Santa Elena, only learning about them through news reports. She claims she was treated like a prisoner by cult members. Aldrete was eventually tried and convicted of several murders and drug smuggling. She was sentenced to 10 years for the drug charges and another 50 years for the murders with a possibility of being released after 25 years.


READ: Here’s How An East LA Neighborhood Brought Down One Of America’s Most Notorious Serial Killers

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Alleged DUI Driver Kills A Pregnant Latina

Entertainment

Alleged DUI Driver Kills A Pregnant Latina

Joe Raedle / Getty

Twenty-three-year-old Yesenia Lisette Aguilar was preparing to welcome a new life into her life with her husband this year. Last week she was killed by an alleged drunk driver while the couple was walking down a sidewalk in Anaheim, California.

Aguilar and her husband James Alvarez were walking in Anaheim last week when she was struck by an alleged drunk driver.

A Jeep SUV driven by Courtney Pandolfi, aged 40, jumped the curb of a sidewalk and drove along it before hitting Aguilar. The car narrowly missed James who said that when his wife was struck they were holding hands. At the time of her death worked as a cast member at Disneyland and was nearly 35 weeks pregnant.

Soon after the incident, Aguilar was rushed to the hospital at UCI Medical Center. There, doctors declared her dead and then delivered her baby via cesarean section. Currently, Aguilar’s newborn baby girl, Adalyn Rose, is in the hospital’s neonatal intensive care unit. She is in critical condition.

Speaking about his wife’s tragic death, Alvarez told KTLA, “It’s like I’m living a nightmare and I’m hoping to wake up soon. But I’m accepting the reality is she’s gone. And my daughter is the only thing that I have left.”

Pandolfi has been detained on single counts of vehicular manslaughter, felony driving under the influence, and driving on a suspended license.

Pandolfi was also taken to the same hospital but for minor injuries.

Soon after her detainment, Pandolfi’s charges were upgraded to murder and felony driving under the influence of drugs causing bodily injury. According to People, police confirmed that this is not Pandolfi’s first DUI arrest. She has previously been convicted of DUIs in 2008, 2015, and 2016. She is currently being held in Anaheim on a $1 million bail.

Speaking about his wife, Alvarez shared that their newborn had very much been wanted by his wife.

“We’ve been trying for two years, and finally, we’re blessed to have a beautiful princess, and we’re a month away from her birth. And all of a sudden, out of a second, my life changed,” he said. “I’m just praying that she is healthy. She’s the last thing I have from her.”

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More Than 1,200 Women And Girls Have Gone Missing In Peru During The Pandemic And Officials Think They Know Why

Things That Matter

More Than 1,200 Women And Girls Have Gone Missing In Peru During The Pandemic And Officials Think They Know Why

Rodrigo Abd / Getty Images

Apart from combating the Coronavirus, Peru has suffered a heartbreaking increase in the number of missing women and girls. Just as hundreds of thousands of women took to the streets to demand an end to gender-based violence, the Coronavirus hit and those same marches have had to be put on hold.

Now, as millions of women are forced to stay at home under strict lockdown orders, they’re spending more time with potentially abusive partners or family members. Many experts believe this combination of circumstances is leading to an increase in domestic violence as hundreds of women in Peru have been reported missing since the start of the pandemic.

Hundreds of women and girls have gone missing since the start of the lockdown.

In Peru, hundreds of women and girls have gone missing and many are feared dead since lockdown orders were put into place to help contain the spread of Covid-19. According to authorities (including Peru’s women’s ministry), at least 1,2000 women and girls have been reported missing since the start of the pandemic – a much higher figure than during non-Coronavirus months.

“The figures are really quite alarming,” Isabel Ortiz, a top women’s rights official, told the Reuters news agency on Tuesday. “We know the numbers of women and girls who have disappeared, but we don’t have detailed information about how many have been found,” she said. “We don’t have proper and up-to-date records.”

Ortiz is pushing the government to start keeping records so that authorities can track those who go missing – whether they are found alive or dead and whether they are victims of sex trafficking, domestic violence or femicide.

The women’s ministry said the government was working to eradicate violence against women and had increased funding this year for gender-based violence prevention programs.

Like many Latin American countries, Peru has long suffered from reports of domestic violence.

Credit: Cecile Lafranco / Getty Images

The Andean nation home to 33 million people has long had a domestic violence problem, but the home confinement measures because of the pandemic has made the situation worse, said Eliana Revollar, who leads the women’s rights office of the National Ombudsman’s office, an independent body that monitors Peru’s human rights.

Before COVID-19, five women were reported missing in Peru every single day, but since the lockdown, that number has surged to eight a day. Countries worldwide have reported increases in domestic violence under coronavirus lockdowns, prompting the United Nations to call for urgent government action.

According to the UN, Latin America has the world’s highest rates of femicide, defined as the gender-motivated killing of women. Almost 20 million women and girls a year are estimated to endure sexual and physical violence in the region.

Latin America and the Caribbean are known for high rates of femicide and violence against women, driven by a macho culture and social norms that dictate women’s roles, Ortiz said. She added, “Violence against women exists because of the many patriarchal patterns that exist in our society.”

“There are many stereotypes about the role of women that set how their behaviour should be, and when these are not adhered to, violence is used against women,” she said.

Before the pandemic, hundreds of thousands of women throughout Latin America, including Peru, were staging mass street demonstrations demanding that their governments should act against gender-based violence.

Meanwhile, the country is also struggling to contain the Coronavirus pandemic.

Credit: Cecile Lafranco / Getty Images

Despite implementing one of the world’s longest running stay-at-home orders, Peru has become one of the hardest hit countries. As of August 11, Peru has confirmed more than 483,000 cases of Coronavirus and 21,276 people have died.

Hospitals are struggling to cope with the rising number of patients and healthcare workers have protested against a lack of personal protective equipment (PPE).

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