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A Cuban-American Man And Mexican Woman Led One Of The Most Violent Satanic Cults In The 1980s

Satanic cults with a pension for ritualistic killings have long existed in the terrified imaginations of people around the world. They exist in urban legend but rarely are they proven to be real. However, one such cult did exist in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico, and they would go on to claim 15 lives between 1986 and 1989. The cult was led by Cuban-American Aldofo Constanzo and Mexican Sara Aldrete. Among their victims is Mark Kilroy, an American pre-med student at the University of Texas at Austin. Kilroy was down in Mexico with friends for Spring Break when he was kidnapped and murdered by the cult in one of their final ritualistic murders. Here’s the story of the gang dubbed Los Narcosatánicos.

Sara Aldrete and Adolfo Constanzo led a bloodthirsty, drug smuggling Satanic cult in the 1980s in Matamoros, Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Mily Martell / YouTube

In 1989, Constanzo and Aldrete were 26 and 24, respectively, when police figured out that the two were behind a string of killings dating back to 1986.

Constanzo was a Cuban-American born and raised in Miami by a practicing santera.

Mily Martell / YouTube

Constanzo followed in his mother’s footsteps and began practicing  santería. As he got older, Constanzo dabbled with darker, more extreme forms of witchcraft and satanic worship. It wasn’t long until he began to explore a dark side of Palo Mayombe, a form of santería with roots in the Congo.

Aldrete is a Mexican national born in Matamoros who was a student at Texas Southmost College at the time of the murders.

Mily Martell / YouTube

Aldrete had dated Constanzo before he came out to her as gay, according to former Brownsville Deputy Sheriff George Gavito. Rolling Stone reports that it was only after meeting Aldrete that Constanzo’s violence against random people began to escalate.

Aldrete and Constanzo formed the cult that came to be called Los Narcosatánicos. They operated just across the river from Brownsville, Texas, smuggling drugs and killing people in sacrificial rituals.

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According to The New York Times, Los Narcosatánicos claimed that by performing the ritualistic killings the group would be protected from the police. Members of the cult also told authorities that Constanzo, known to them as El Padrino (The Godfather), said the killings would make them invincible to bullets.

The streets of Matamoros, a popular destination for college students, proved to be a good place to find victims for the cult.

Mily Martell / YouTube

Many college students would venture into Matamoros for Spring Break and long weekends. The drinking age was lower than the U.S. and getting into Matamoros from Brownsville was easy to do on foot.

It was the disappearance of The University of Texas at Austin pre-med student, Mark Kilroy, that would eventually bring the cult down.

Mark Kilroy was in Matamoros in March 1989 during Spring Break. According to PEOPLE Magazine, Kilroy was staying with three friends in South Padre Island, Texas, about 20 miles from the U.S.-Mexico border. On the first night of their stay, the friends made their way into Matamoros for a night of drinking and celebration. That first night ended without incident and the four friends made their way back to their lodging. March 14, 1989, their second night out in Matamoros, would be a fateful night. After drinking until 2 a.m., Kilroy and his friends started walking back to the border. Their car was parked on the U.S. side. The group walked in twos, with Kilroy and his friend, Bill Huddleston, lagging behind.

During the walk, Rolling Stone reports that Huddleston ventured off to pee, leaving Kilroy alone on the street. When he returned, Kilroy was gone. Huddleston reunited with the two other men on the trip. When they didn’t hear from Kilroy the next morning, they knew something was wrong and went to the police.

Four weeks after Kilroy went missing, Mexican authorities had a break in the case.

Mily Martell / YouTube

In early April, police apprehended Elio Hernandez Rivera, 22 at the time, for running through a police checkpoint with marijuana in his possession. Hernandez Rivera told the police names of different drug dealers and even led them to Rancho Santa Elena where the cult carried out their murders, according to Rolling Stone. At first, the authorities believed they were on a drug bust but after showing Hernandez Rivera a photo of Kilroy, things took a sickening turn. Hernandez Rivera confirmed that Kilroy had been to the property and was buried there.

Four cult members assisted the police in uncovering the bodies of the cult’s victims who were buried in Rancho Santa Elena.

Mily Martell / YouTube

In the case of Kilroy, the first thing found was his brain, which was found in a black cauldron after having been boiled in blood with a turtle, spinal column and a horseshoe. Hernandez Rivera told authorities that Constanzo, who had named him second-in-command, told the cult to abduct an Anglo for the ritual to achieve the necessary outcome. Kilroy was lured away by a man who spoke English and was pulled into a truck and driven to the ranch.

Police learned that Kilroy was killed with a single machete blow to the back of the head.

The New York Times notes that Kilroy tried to escape after 12 hours in captivity and was killed by Constanzo in retaliation for his trying to escape. Kilroy was then dismembered and used in a sacrificial ritual to further protect the cult from police and physical injury. On Rancho Santa Elena, Constanzo set up one of the buildings was set up as a shrine to the murder of his victims. In disgust, the shrine was burned by authorities.

In total, the cult claimed 15 lives from the U.S. and Mexico.

Mily Martell / YouTube

Most were dismembered and brutalized after their death. The discovery of the bodies sent residents of Matamoros into a panic as rumors of retaliation spread, according to Rolling Stone. There was a fear that cult members would take their revenge by abducting children for their human sacrifices, but no such abductions occurred.

Two weeks after Rancho Santa Elena was discovered and investigated, police learned about Constanzo’s Mexico City hideout. They surrounded it and a shootout ensued.

Mily Martell / YouTube

Once Constanzo knew that the police had surrounded his apartment building in Mexico City, he snapped. He burned money on the stove and started throwing money out of the window while shooting at passersby. Police returned fire and quickly advanced into the apartment to put an end to Los Narcosatánicos.

In his last act against police, Costanzo ordered he and his boyfriend killed.

Mily Martell / YouTube

Rolling Stone says Aldrete denies having any knowledge of the killings that took place at Rancho Santa Elena, only learning about them through news reports. She claims she was treated like a prisoner by cult members. Aldrete was eventually tried and convicted of several murders and drug smuggling. She was sentenced to 10 years for the drug charges and another 50 years for the murders with a possibility of being released after 25 years.


READ: Here’s How An East LA Neighborhood Brought Down One Of America’s Most Notorious Serial Killers

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Hundreds Gather to Mourn Yadhira Romero Martinez, Who Was Violently Murdered in Minnesota

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Hundreds Gather to Mourn Yadhira Romero Martinez, Who Was Violently Murdered in Minnesota

Photo via GoFundMe

Last Thursday, 19-year-old Yadhira Romero Martinez left work. Her housemate, Jose Daniel Cuenca-Zuniga’s, picked her up and drove her home. Surveillance footage showed her entering her home with Cuenca-Zuniga at 6pm. After that, no one ever heard from her again.

On Friday, authorities found Yadhira Romero Martinez dead in the room she rented in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

Police found her “with a plastic bag lying across her forehead and wearing only a T-shirt.” There were bruises on her face and her neck. She had “what appeared to be handprints outlined in blood on her thighs.”

Yadhira Romero Martinez rented a room from a woman who owned a home in Minneapolis. She shared the house with at least one other renter, the aforementioned Jose Daniel Cuenca-Zuniga. Romero Martinez had moved from Mexico to Minneapolis last September. According to her family, she had moved to the U.S. for “a better life”.

By Friday, the homeowner realized that something was wrong. Through a cracked door, she saw Romero Martinez laying unconscious on her bed.

Cuenca-Zuniga told the homeowner that Yadhira had simply had too much to drink. But shortly after, the young man packed his belongings and fled. The homeowner then called the authorities after repeatedly knocking on the door and getting no answer.

On Sunday, police tracked down Jose Daniel Cuenca-Zuniga in Ohio, where he had fled. Police have since charged Cuenca-Zuniga with intentional second-degree murder.

Yadhira’s family, as well as the Minneapolis community at large, are grieving over the death of a bright young woman who “didn’t have a bad bone in her body.”

On Saturday, hundreds gathered in Minneapolis to attend the vigil of Yadhira Romero Martinez. Many of the mourners spoke about how the young woman’s murder was an act of misogynistic femicide.

“I didn’t know Yadhira, but I’m here because I’m a woman, like her, and I’m an immigrant, like her,” said one of the attendees to Fox 9 News. “And I’m scared that that’s going to happen to me.”

“It breaks my heart seeing just a Hispanic woman, lady, that gets her life taken away, you know, without doing nothing, without harming nobody,” said vigil attendee, Cesar Vence to WCCO. “Why do these things have to happen, you know, to a young lady that just comes from Mexico to work and support her family?”

On Facebook, Yadhira’s cousin, Jun Romero, wrote a passionate eulogy that doubled as a call-to-action.

“To have her life taken so soon to such a violent and disgusting way was something she didn’t deserve. No one deserves that,” he wrote. “She was my cousin. She was a daughter. She was a sister. SHE WAS A PERSON. I love her and I will miss her.”

He finished his post with: “Please protect your sisters and educate your boys/men. Machismo, sexism, and violence exist in every nook and cranny of our lives no matter how small. If you see it, stop it. Unlearn to stay silent in these matters for the sake of women and fem-presenting people everywhere. She didn’t deserve this and you don’t either.”

Her family set up a GoFundMe page to raise enough funds to “transport her body to Mexico so her parents can do a funeral service”. You can donate here.

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Street Vendor By The Name Of Lorenzo Pérez Murdered Execution Style — “The person who killed my dad took away a part of me”

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Street Vendor By The Name Of Lorenzo Pérez Murdered Execution Style — “The person who killed my dad took away a part of me”

Like many street vendors, 45-year-old Lorenzo Pérez sold food to support his family.

Married and the father of four children ages 15, 13, 9, and 1, Perez is described by friends and family as being well known amongst neighborhood residents. He was often seen working alongside his daughter who helped him on occasion. Now, the community and family who knew Perez well are in mourning, after he was shot in broad daylight while doing his job.

Perez died after he being shot in the head in southeast Fresno on Sunday afternoon.

Fresno Police were called to the scene of a possible robbery at Alta and Pierce Avenues, near Kings Canyon and Willow around 4:30 p.m. on Sunday. On the way to the scene, the police officers learned that a street vendor had been shot once in the head.

According to reports, Perez was rushed to Community Regional Medical Center where he ultimately died.

Witnesses of the murder told officers that a man had beckoned Perez to come over to him in a way that suggested he was going to purchase something from him.

According to police reports, when Perez walked up to the suspect, the man pulled out a gun and shot the vendor. He then stole a few items, which have not been identified, and flew the scene. Witnesses told police officers that they’d seen the man loitering around the area before the shooting.

A local news station reported that “Officers are now looking into surveillance footage from the area to try and identify the shooter… Through a statement, Fresno City Council President Luis Chavez announced that he will be offering a $5000 reward for information leading to the shooter’s arrest.”

“The coward that murdered our food vendor, turn yourself in and face the consequences. You’ve brought tremendous pain to a family and our city,” Chavez exclaimed in the statement.

To help the Perez family, Councilmember Esmeralda Soria set up a GoFundMe account which has already raised $141,780 out of its $125,000 goal.

Perez’s son, Isai, described his father in a recent interview as a “great man.”

“My father was a great man. He was a great father, a great husband, a great friend,” he said in an interview. “He spread love and kindness. He was about fairness, he wanted to share his happiness. He meant no harm. He didn’t deserve to go like this. The person who killed my dad took away a part of me. My dad went through everything for us. He took away my father. He took away the opportunity of me being with him in his last moments and it’s heartbreaking. I hope they find the murderer soon.”

If you have any information on the shooting please call Valley Crime Stoppers at (559) 498-STOP.

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