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Little League Player Who Was Caught Lying About His Age Finally Breaks Silence

ESPN / YOUTUBE

In the summer of 2001, Danny Almonte was a star of Little League World Series, a showcase for young baseball players age 12 and under. Almonte’s pitching was out of this world: he struck out an impressive 62 of 72 batters and threw a perfect game. But there was one major problem: Almonte was actually 14 years old, two years above the limit. Before anyone knew he was an overage player, Almonte was becoming a household name. When news broke about Almonte’s real age, the scandal nearly disgraced everyone around him. But what role did Almonte have in it? Was he aware of the deception or was he just a puppet in something larger? Years later, many questions remain.

In an ESPN “30 For 30” short, Danny Almonte opens up about this strange period in Little League history.

ESPN / YOUTUBE

Before his falsified age became front page news, Almonte was becoming a national superstar, especially among fans in the New York borough of the Bronx, which he represented as part of the Baby Bronx Bombers. But Almonte wasn’t really from the Bronx. Before the Little League World series tourney, he spent most of his life in the Dominican Republic.

Once the news broke, however, Amonte’s personal life became a living hell. Some say he ruined the sanctity of Little League, likening Almonte’s scandal to steroid use in the pros. As Almonte explains, in the aftermath, he wished he could go back to the Dominican Republic, back to his mom, away from the 24/7 media coverage. Because English wasn’t his first language, he was unable to defend himself, and so he relied on the adults around him, his father and uncle, the same adults who might have might have played a role in altering his birth certificate in the first place. But Almonte also knew something else: his real age.

So why would someone change his age to 12 years old? And why would Almonte go along with it?

ESPN / YOUTUBE

As ESPN speculated in 2001, reducing Almonte’s age was likely done to attract the attention of scouts, who would be particularly impressed pitching abilities, which were well above average for a 12-year-old. Baseball can provide wealth and opportunity for poor families living in the Dominican Republic, so it’s not uncommon for parents to fudge their child’s birth certificates. It’s also not very difficult, as, according to ESPN at that time, as many as 25 percent of children didn’t even have a valid birth certificate. So if a parent told you that you were 12, you assumed you were 12. As Almonte told ESPN, even though he knew his age, he kept quiet because his father told him to: “The way I was raised, if my dad says something, you gotta do it.”

As ESPN pointed out, Danny Almonte’s age was likely altered so that he, and his family, might have a chance at living the American dream. But in the end, Almonte’s life became a nightmare from which he has, in time, learned to live with. And he’s learned that life is more than baseball.

READ: She Might Be A Tiny Tot But She Is Making Big Moves In The Soccer World

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Dominican Fashion Designer Jenny Polanco Dies From COVID-19 Complications

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Dominican Fashion Designer Jenny Polanco Dies From COVID-19 Complications

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Dominicans and the fashion world are mourning the death of Dominican fashion designer Jenny Polanco. The world-renowned designer had just traveled to Spain when she fell ill. People are showing their love and appreciation of Polanco on social media in a time when physical activities have been limited.

Dominican fashion designer Jenny Polanco has died from COVID-19.

The Dominican Republic’s public health minister Rafael Sánchez announced Polanco’s death. Polanco is the first Latino celebrity who has died from the virus. Polanco is among the first six people to die from the novel coronavirus on the Caribbean island.

Miami Fashion Week dedicated a tribute post to the Caribbean fashion designer.

The designer showed a collection at the last Miami Fashion Week and her sudden loss has saddened those associated with the event. Polanco was able to celebrate her Caribbean roots with the classic avant-garde style. Her take on fashion was breathtaking in its simplicity coupled with their energetic shapes.

Fashion fans are offering loving tributes to Polanco.

“May Dominican designer jenny Polanco rest in peace,” the Twitter user wrote. “The coronavirus took a creative, colorful, beach mind.”

Polanco, like many people who have taken ill, had recently traveled.

A lot of people who have tested positive in the first wave of infections in different countries had recently traveled to a country where the virus was spreading. Since the start of the outbreak, some countries have closed their borders and set travel restrictions as a way to slow the spread of COVID-19.

If you are feeling sick, call your doctor and tell them your symptoms. You can also visit the CDC for more information about COVID-19 and what you can do to prevent catching the virus and what to do if you get sick.

READ: Someone Turned Cardi B’s Coronavirus Rant Into A Remix Now It’s On The Billboard Charts

A Quick Explanation About What Is Happening In The Dominican Republic

Things That Matter

A Quick Explanation About What Is Happening In The Dominican Republic

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Dominicans across the world are protesting in unison to demand transparency in the recent elections in the Dominican Republic. The protests stem from a recent municipal election that many are calling into question. Faulty voting machines and a lack of transparency have set off a warning call within the global Dominican community fearing election tampering and a power grab. Here’s what we know so far.

Dominicans are demanding answers about irregularities in the latest election on the island.

Four hours into the voting process, the Dominican government reported irregularities with the voting machines. According to officials, 60 percent of the voting machines were experiencing the same issue of showing voters incomplete ballots. Many showed just one party on the ballot. That’s when the government, in an unprecedented move, suspended the Feb. 16 elections.

People across the island have joined in taking to the streets to protest against the government’s decision to suspend the elections.

Tensions are flaring on the island about election tampering and voting after one party has ruled the presidency for 24 years. It is also three months until the general elections and Dominicans don’t trust the process after the latest snafu.

“The electronic vote failed us that morning,” Electoral Board Presiden Julio César Castaños Guzmán, said at a press conference.

Yet, Casatños Guzmán admitted that the Dominican government was warned that they knew of the issue before the elections began but were under the impression that they could be fixed when the machines were installed. The elections proved that the issue was not corrected.

Concerned Dominicans are desperately trying to shine a full light on what they consider an imminent dictatorship.

“The Dominican people are under a dictatorship disguised as democracy,” Alejandro Contreras, a protester in New York told NBC News. “We will be demanding the resignation of all the members of the electoral board, as well as a formal public explanation on the impunity and corruption within the government, among other issues.”

The protests and election fears come the same week as the Dominican Republic’s independence day.

On Feb. 27, 1844, the Dominican Independence War led to the imperial independence of the Dominican Republic from Haiti. The number of casualties from the war are unknown but Haiti is estimated to have lost three times more soldiers than the Dominican Republic.

The fears of a dictatorship are real on the island who was under a dictatorship for 31 years in the 20th century. Rafael Trujillo ruled the island with a brutal fist from February 1930 until his assassination in May 1961. He was president of the island for two terms covering 18 years from 1930 to 1938 and again from 1942 to 1952. After the last term, he ruled as an unelected military man keeping the island in fear.

All eyes are on the Dominican Republic and their government as Dominicans across the world fight to preserve its democracy.

Credit: @sixtalee / Twitter

Sigue luchando. El pueblo unido, jamas sera vencido. Viva la democracia.

READ: After A Year Of Bad Press, The Dominican Republic Launches Campaign To Bring Tourists Back