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An Illinois Businessman Was Recently Busted With Thousands Of Counterfeit VapoRub Products In His Store

After receiving an anonymous tip, police busted a business owner in a Chicago suburb for selling counterfeit VapoRub.

An investigation by the Cook County Sheriff’s Police Special Operations Unit has led to charges against a business owner…

Posted by Cook County Sheriff’s Office (Official) on Wednesday, November 22, 2017


Earlier this year, the Cook County Sheriff’s Police Special Operations Unit was first tipped off about a business owner, Carlos Barraza, who was possibly selling counterfeit goods. Dos Hermanos, Barraza’s business, is a beauty and cosmetics wholesaler. Barraza was accused of selling counterfeit VapoRub to stores in Illinois and Wisconsin. A tip sent to Procter & Gamble, the company that owns VapoRub, prompted the company to send a private investigator to the area to determine whether or not the product was being sold at the stores. According to a press release provided by Cook County Sheriff’s Office, police executed a search warrant on Nov. 16 and confiscated 2,000 containers of fake VapoRub from the Dos Hermanos store in Bedford Park, Ill. Bedford Park is about a 40-minute drive south from Chicago.

“Consumers should be cautious about buying branded goods from outlets that are unfamiliar,” Sheriff Thomas J. Dart said in the press release. “Buy branded goods from sources that you know and trust and where your consumer rights will be protected. Consumers who suspect an item is counterfeit should contact the retailer where they made the purchase.

Barraza is facing charges of violating the Trademark Counterfeiting Act, according to the Cook County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman. The Trademark Counterfeiting Act of 1984 states that “‘whoever intentionally traffics or attempts to traffic in goods and services and knowingly uses a counterfeit mark on or in connection with such goods or services’ shall be guilty of a felony,” according to the Offices of the United States Attorneys. However, the penalty for violating trademarks is handled on a case-by-case basis, as stated by the Offices of the United States Attorneys.

Procter & Gamble didn’t respond to our request for comment by the time this story was published.

(H/T: Oak Lawn Patch)


READ: Man Arrested In Texas For First Fajita Related First Degree Felony Probably In History

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Nurse Shares Heartfelt Video Explaining Why She Had To Quit Her Job During The COVID-19 Outbreak

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Nurse Shares Heartfelt Video Explaining Why She Had To Quit Her Job During The COVID-19 Outbreak

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The COVID-19 health crisis is shutting down governments around the world. The global infection rate crossed 1 million on April 2 and continues to climb. In the U.S., nurses and doctors are facing severe equipment shortages leaving many of the front-line workers vulnerable to contracting the virus, which has already killed more than 5,780 Americans. One nurse shared a heartbreaking video of her explaining why she had to quit her job as the crisis continues to unfold.

Imaris is a nurse in Chicago, one of the cities expected to see a high number of COVID-19 cases.

View this post on Instagram

#NURSESCAN 2020! 👩🏻‍⚕️✊🏼 So I have been off of work for about two weeks now and on my last day of work, there was only 1 confirmed #covid19 case in the county that I am working in. Today there is 130 confirmed cases, 1 death, and my city just shutdown the Lakefront and all parks. ⠀ I am scared 😥 No doubt about that. I am not sure what to expect, but I have honestly tried to keep myself at a distance from social media and the media in general; the information overload can be hard to sift through as far as what is credible and what is not, it triggers me. ⠀ I already suffer with anxiety and bi-polar depression and was feeling a heavy toll with transitioning back into the ICU after being away from the bedside for over a year. I am now feeling already defeated before walking onto the battlefield; I know this isn't the right mindset, but I am just sharing my raw emotions and thoughts with you all right now. I am hoping to have a change of morale real soon. ⠀ If there is one thing I know, it's that n̶o̶t̶h̶i̶n̶g̶ ̶h̶a̶p̶p̶e̶n̶s̶ without 𝓮𝓯𝓯𝓸𝓻𝓽 𝓸𝓻 𝓪𝓬𝓽𝓲𝓸𝓷, so here are the three things I plan on doing to put forth my part for 𝗺𝘆𝘀𝗲𝗹𝗳 𝗮𝗻𝗱 𝘁𝗵𝗲 𝗰𝗼𝗺𝗺𝘂𝗻𝗶𝘁𝘆 and how 𝕪𝕠𝕦 𝕔𝕒𝕟 𝕥𝕒𝕜𝕖 𝔸ℂ𝕋𝕀𝕆ℕ 𝕥𝕠𝕠 against C̶O̶V̶I̶D̶-̶1̶9̶. ⠀ 1️⃣ Keeping up with your outlets and reputable resources. Your outlets are the people you're isolating with, usually loved ones. Talk to them, talk to each other and do mental check ins. Resources I've kept up with are the World Health Organization ( @who ), and The Centers for Disease Control ( @cdcgov ). ⠀ 2️⃣ For those of you who are working at institutions running out of the #N95masks, gloves, gowns and goggles you need in order to care for the #covid_19 patients, please click the link 🔗 in my bio to notify Congress to get you #PPE ! #GETMEPPE. ⠀ 3️⃣ Join the #NursesCan campaign! 💪🏼 Inspired by the “We Can Do It!" #rosietheriveter poster, the campaign was created by @nurse.georgie to boost nurse worker moral and share stories from our modern-day nurse heroes during our country’s COVID-19 #pandemic.⁣ Link 🔗 in bio! ⠀ ⠀ ⠀ ⠀

A post shared by ❥ Imaris | Nursing & Lifestyle (@nurse.iv) on

Illinois has seen an increase in cases recently. The latest numbers from Illinois show that 7,695 have tested positive for COVID-19. There have also been 157 deaths in the state.

According to her Instagram, Imaris is no stranger to the ICU and emergency situations.

As the war rages against COVID-19, hospitals and health care workers are calling for more equipment to help them fight. There is a shortage of personal protection equipment (PPE) including face masks, face shields, gowns, and gloves. PPEs keep the doctors and nurses safe when they are interacting with and treating sick patients.

The Chicago-based nurse took to Instagram to share her story about fighting COVID-19 and why she had to quit.

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I chose 𝓂𝓎 𝓁𝒾𝒻𝑒 today… ⠀ & my family members who have pre-existing conditions that wouldn’t get a ventilator if they contracted #COVID19 from me ⠀ I had a different idea in mind when I got to my #ICU this morning; I expected to see ALL OF OUR #NURSES & STAFF wearing #N95 masks but 𝙣𝙤 𝙤𝙣𝙚 𝙝𝙖𝙙 𝘼𝙉𝙔𝙏𝙃𝙄𝙉𝙂 𝙊𝙉… ⠀ Each ICU room had ‘make-shift’ ante-rooms attached to them created with plastic tarp & massive amounts of tape.. ⠀ A charge Nurse was passing out single N95 masks to nurses with a brown paper bag for them to store their mask in which was to be in inside their plastic ante-rooms & to 𝙗𝙚 𝙧𝙚-𝙪𝙨𝙚𝙙 𝙖𝙣𝙙 𝙧𝙚-𝙖𝙥𝙥𝙡𝙞𝙚𝙙 𝙖𝙡𝙡 𝙙𝙖𝙮… ⠀ I asked “well what if there’s possible contamination to that N95 mask..? What about my safety” ⠀ My manager told me “well our staff safety is our main priority right now … if we get enough masks, we may consider having staff wear surgical masks in the weeks to come..” ⠀ I replied, “But it’s Airborne… those surgical masks won’t protect us ..” ⠀ My manager then tells me “ we’ve kept up with the CDC & it is only when the COVID patient has any aerosol type treatments like a ventilator, nasal cannula, nebulizer etc that’s it’s airborne..otherwise it’s droplet ..” ⠀ I replied “& 90% of our patients are intubated, paralyzed, & positive for COVID.. people not even in the hospital environment are spreading it .. we have to assume everyone is infected..especially in the hospital environment, & 𝕟𝕠 𝕠𝕟𝕖 𝕙𝕖𝕣𝕖 𝕖𝕧𝕖𝕟 𝕙𝕒𝕤 𝕒 𝕕𝕣𝕠𝕡𝕝𝕖𝕥 𝕞𝕒𝕤𝕜 𝕠𝕟” ⠀ I then told her of nurses wearing a surgical droplet masks on their units & now intubated & fighting for their lives … ⠀ Tears were streaming down my face & fog in my glasses at this point.. ⠀ I thought to myself.. 𝘏𝘰𝘸 𝘸𝘪𝘭𝘭 𝘐 𝘤𝘰𝘷𝘦𝘳 𝘳𝘦𝘯𝘵 𝘰𝘳 𝘣𝘶𝘺 𝘨𝘳𝘰𝘤𝘦𝘳𝘪𝘦𝘴, 𝘮𝘺 𝘣𝘪𝘭𝘭𝘴..? ⠀ I asked one last time pleading with tears in my eyes.. ⠀ “Can I please just wear 𝐦𝐲 𝐨𝐰𝐧 𝐍𝟗𝟓 𝐦𝐚𝐬𝐤… I understand we have a shortage but I have my OWN ” ⠀ My manager told me that they couldn’t allow me to wear it. ⠀ So I gave report, & left. ⠀ America is NOT prepared & Nurses are NOT safe. Plz DM me any telehealth jobs.

A post shared by ❥ Imaris | Nursing & Lifestyle (@nurse.iv) on

Imaris broke down what so many health care workers are currently facing. There is a shortage of the things they need to keep themselves safe. The nurse was most concerned about the lack of masks being given to nurses, 91 percent of whom are women. The lack of basic safety equipment bothered the nurse because she believes it does nothing to protect the nurses. In response, the nurse quit and warned viewers that “America is NOT prepared & Nurses are NOT safe.”

People are showing support for the nurse.

Credit: datninjachris / Instagram

If you know someone working in health care, you understand the concern for their safety. The Chicago nurse says int he video that she is scared of going home to her family without having used the protecting gear all day.

Thank a health care worker today. They could use positive energy.

READ: A Group Of Women At A Migrant Detention Center Demanded Information About Covid-19, Then They Were Pepper Sprayed

Recreational Marijuana Will Soon Be Legal In Illinois But Immigrants Are Being Warned To Keep Away From It

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Recreational Marijuana Will Soon Be Legal In Illinois But Immigrants Are Being Warned To Keep Away From It

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This summer, Illinois became the first state to legalize recreational cannabis use through a state legislator when the Illinois Cannabis Regulation and Tax Act was passed by Governor J.B. Pritzker in May. However, not everyone will be able to benefit from the new law. Advocates are warning immigrants to stay away from consuming or working in the marijuana industry because of small legality that could reflect poorly on their cases.

While states have been legalizing marijuana, it is still illegal federally. An immigrant, undocumented or otherwise, can freely use the herb in Illinois, but should they own up to it, they would be admitting to breaking federal law. Illinois is the 11th state in the U.S. to legalize recreational marijuana use and the new law will go into effect in January. 

Advocates want to protect immigrants from hurting their cases — as fair as the situation is.

Credit: Pixabay

“Unfortunately, a lot of people don’t know about these consequences,” Mony Ruiz-Velasco, executive director of PASO West Suburban Action Project told the Chicago Tribune. “Just admitting use makes you a potential target for deportation. So you don’t have to have a criminal arrest or conviction, you just have to admit to use.” 

Ruis-Velasco is also warning immigrants who live in mixed-status households to stay away from the industry altogether. Even if a citizen in the household works in the industry, it could reflect poorly on an undocumented family member. 

The issue is not specific to Illinois immigrants either, states, where cannabis is legal, have been affected tremendously by the incompatibilities between the state and federal laws, along with the Trump administration’s hardline immigration policies. 

Immigrants around the country in states where marijuana is legal are seeing threats to their status.

Credit: Pixabay

“Even though the state legalizes it, under federal law, the immigration consequences of drug use (are) … extremely harsh,” Colorado attorney Aaron Hall said. “So we’ve seen people who purchase marijuana at the dispensary in good faith and later come back and it leads to the denial of permanent residency.”

Denver, Colorado mayor Michael Hancock even penned a letter pleading to U.S. Attorney General William Bar to ease the restrictions where state’s have legalized the substance.

“Denver understands the need for federal laws and regulations regarding citizenship and immigration, but we are seeing the heartbreaking effects that those federal laws and regulations are having on our residents,” Hancock wrote. “However, under current federal policy, lawful, permanent residents like Denver residents I have met with are being denied naturalization and may lose their legal status based on their lawful employment in the cannabis industry.”

ICE has remained strident about not making any concessions for immigrants caught in the unusual predicament. 

“ICE continues to pursue foreign-born nationals convicted of drug-related offenses by local and state law enforcement,” the agency told the Chicago Tribune

Kathleen Vannucci, an attorney who is a member of the American Immigration Lawyers Association, said she has already seen cases where immigrants were denied citizenship because they admitted to marijuana use or employment in the cannabis industry in states where it is legal. In Washington, immigrants have been denied on the basis that they have bad “moral character” which requires them to wait five years before applying for citizenship again. 

Some low-level cannabis workers can be accused of drug trafficking with the way the laws are written. ICE’s official marijuana policy, issued in April, makes its stance clear.

“The policy guidance also clarifies that an applicant (for citizenship) who is involved in certain marijuana-related activities may lack good moral character if found to have violated federal law, even if such activity has been decriminalized under applicable state laws,” the policy states. 

Advocates are trying to figure out the best course of action to protect immigrants, until then their advice is to stay away from the drug.

In April, when ICE’s marijuana policy was announced Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) began advising non-citizens to, “never leave the house carrying marijuana or paraphernalia, a medical marijuana card, or wearing clothing with marijuana imagery on it.” 

The organization also warned non-citizens to keep anything cannabis-related off of their phones and social media since those things might be monitored too. 

The legalization of marijuana is largely a way to resolve the criminal justice issues caused by the mass incarceration of nonviolent drug offenders. Moreover, nonwhites and whites use marijuana at roughly the same rates while the former group is incarcerated for the behavior far more frequently. Legalization’s new industry has also been shown to stimulate local economies by hundreds of millions of dollars. 

“I think that this is a complicated area of law as we have explained,” Ruiz-Velasco said. “I do think that there wasn’t enough information out there (when the legalization bill was being considered in Illinois). But we are trying to work with legislatures now and the government to try to make sure there is something that can be done to reduce the harm that will come.”