credit: Cook County Sheriff's Office (Official) / Facebook / Christina Henderson / mitú

An Illinois Businessman Was Recently Busted With Thousands Of Counterfeit VapoRub Products In His Store

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After receiving an anonymous tip, police busted a business owner in a Chicago suburb for selling counterfeit VapoRub.

An investigation by the Cook County Sheriff’s Police Special Operations Unit has led to charges against a business owner…

Posted by Cook County Sheriff’s Office (Official) on Wednesday, November 22, 2017


Earlier this year, the Cook County Sheriff’s Police Special Operations Unit was first tipped off about a business owner, Carlos Barraza, who was possibly selling counterfeit goods. Dos Hermanos, Barraza’s business, is a beauty and cosmetics wholesaler. Barraza was accused of selling counterfeit VapoRub to stores in Illinois and Wisconsin. A tip sent to Procter & Gamble, the company that owns VapoRub, prompted the company to send a private investigator to the area to determine whether or not the product was being sold at the stores. According to a press release provided by Cook County Sheriff’s Office, police executed a search warrant on Nov. 16 and confiscated 2,000 containers of fake VapoRub from the Dos Hermanos store in Bedford Park, Ill. Bedford Park is about a 40-minute drive south from Chicago.

“Consumers should be cautious about buying branded goods from outlets that are unfamiliar,” Sheriff Thomas J. Dart said in the press release. “Buy branded goods from sources that you know and trust and where your consumer rights will be protected. Consumers who suspect an item is counterfeit should contact the retailer where they made the purchase.

Barraza is facing charges of violating the Trademark Counterfeiting Act, according to the Cook County Sheriff’s Office spokeswoman. The Trademark Counterfeiting Act of 1984 states that “‘whoever intentionally traffics or attempts to traffic in goods and services and knowingly uses a counterfeit mark on or in connection with such goods or services’ shall be guilty of a felony,” according to the Offices of the United States Attorneys. However, the penalty for violating trademarks is handled on a case-by-case basis, as stated by the Offices of the United States Attorneys.

Procter & Gamble didn’t respond to our request for comment by the time this story was published.

(H/T: Oak Lawn Patch)


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