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Salma Hayek Isn’t Shy About Interrupting Trevor Noah In This Interview To Defend The Role Of Her Immigrant Character

“Beatriz At Dinner” has become a huge topic of conversation for Salma Hayek, who plays the lead role in this drama film. This week, she hung out with Trevor Noah at “The Daily Show” to talk more in-depth about the thematics of immigration and politics embedded in the film’s narrative – which coincidentally parallels our current political climate, and about that awkward moment Donald Trump asked her out on a date.

Salma Hayek arrived at “The Daily Show” ready to dive deep about the underlying messages in her new movie “Beatriz At Dinner.”

CREDIT: COMEDY CENTRAL

If you haven’t seen the movie that was released on June 9th, Beatriz is an immigrant who is often undermined as someone who just works for rich people. Salma clarifies to Trevor Noah that Beatriz is a healer who also works with cancer patients. “As Beatriz, I don’t want people to think I only work for rich people. She’d be terribly offended.”

Even though Beatriz faces a completely different reality from that of the rich, white people in the movie, Salma points out that there is actually one thing they have in common.

CREDIT: COMEDY CENTRAL

While Beatriz is a poor immigrant who loves animals, and Doug Strutt is a rich man who loves to hunt and is “so obnoxious, and sometimes such a jerk,” there is still one thing that brings these two characters together: they both “long for a place where there is purity.”

“I think this is what can give hope to humanity. That we all long for a place, whether we are conscious or not, where you are pure,” she added.

Trevor pointed out that there seems to be a huge parallel between the billionaire character who is kind of an a-hole and believes he can do what he wants with the world as long as it benefits him, and our president.

CREDIT: COMEDY CENTRAL

Salma says that the script for the movie was written when Trump was only toying with the idea of running for the presidency. As she told Trevor, “It was not inspired or influenced [by Trump]. When you watch the movie, it’s strange, it’s kind of uncanny…as if he (screenplay writer, Mike White) could predict the future. As if he could hear some of the conversations in the future.”

And speaking of Trump, Salma confirmed that Donald Trump had the nerve to ask her out on a date once… When he was well aware that she had a boyfriend.

CREDIT: COMEDY CENTRAL

Since Trevor couldn’t “picture Donald Trump asking” anyone out on a date, he asked Salma to explain exactly how Trump went about this. And Salma’s immediate response was, “He didn’t come and try to grab me for sure!”

To hear more about Salma’s thoughts on “Beatriz At Dinner” and that cringe-worthy time Trump asked her out on a date, check out the full video below:


WATCH: Salma Hayek Saves Us All As Anti-Immigrant Racism Rears Its Ugly Head In “Beatriz At Dinner” Trailer


What are your thoughts on “Beatriz at Dinner”? Comment and hit the share button below. 

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Surfing Is Not Legal In Cuba Because The Government Is Afraid Of This

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Surfing Is Not Legal In Cuba Because The Government Is Afraid Of This

Over the years, Cuba’s government hasn’t been the kindest to its surfers, or surfing.

MAKE WILD / FACEBOOK

The sport isn’t technically legal in Cuba, it’s heavily frowned upon, and there are only around 100 surfers in the country.

If Cuba considered surfing a sport, the government would provide funds to its athletes.

MAKE WILD / FACEBOOK

Instead, the government classifies surfing as a recreational activity rather than a sport, meaning Cuban surfers are often forced to make their own surfboards. Cuban designers usually have to craft a board out miscellaneous materials, like foam from old refrigerators or salvaged fiberglass.

However, Cuba’s government is wary of surfers because they believe they could be trying to flee the country.

MAKE WILD / FACEBOOK

As the New York Times reported, Cuba’s government has always been suspicious of surfers because people normally defect from the country via the waters. Cuban surfer Eduardo Valdes told the New York Times that the country’s earliest surfers, from Baracoa, were arrested for attempting to leave the country.

And the government believes surfing is too closely associated with U.S. culture.

MAKE WILD / FACEBOOK

Cuban surfer Arnan Perez Lantigua told Surfer how Cuba associates it with the U.S., saying,

“They also consider it an American sport, which is a problem for the government because they see RVCA and Quiksilver and all the companies as private American companies, which they don’t want to support. So that also makes it pretty much impossible to be sponsored by an American company.”

But the country’s surfers want to represent Cuba in the 2020 olympics, so they’re fighting these stigmas.

MAKE WILD / YOUTUBE

Thanks to the current political and social evolution in Cuba, surfers are attempting to change the government and the people’s perception of the sport. They’ve established a petition, which people can sign here, and they’re working to legitimize the sport by making the public aware of what surfing is.

And a documentary is capturing this pivotal time in Cuba’s surfing culture.

Legitimize surfing in Cuba – #surflibre

Right now, surfing is not a recognized sport in Cuba. Please sign and share the petition at www.surflibre.org to give Cuba's surfers the opportunity to pursue their passion and join the world for the 2020 Olympic Games. How? What? Why?The ocean was once a strict border for Cuba, and if you were caught floating off shore it was consided an an attempt to flee the country. Combined with conspiricy theorys about the CIA smuggling contraban into Cuba via surfboards, a legal grey zone around the sport has blocked surfers on the island from competing both in and outside their country. Dreaming of connecting with the world and protecting their oceans, this island community hopes that having the world at their backs will finally tip the scales in their favor. More on the story can be found at www.havanalibrefilm.com – where Makewild has been creating a documentary film on Cuba's underground surfing transformation during the country's monumental moment of change in 2016.

Posted by Makewild on Tuesday, June 6, 2017

MAKE WILD / FACEBOOK 

Despite being unnamed as of today, the documentary is currently scheduled for a 2018 release. Tons of great information is available on their website, which you can check out here.

(MORE: HAVANA LIBRE FILM)

WATCH: The Amazing Footage From Cuba’s First Independent Video Game

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