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Forever 21 And Taco Bell Joined Forces For A Clothing Line, And We’ve Rated Some Pieces

Forever 21

Forever 21 teamed up with Taco Bell to create a special collection of shirts, bodysuits and outerwear for men, women and children. They’re calling the move “fast food meets fast fashion.”

CREDIT: Photo credit: Forever 21

After today’s launch, some aren’t quite sure what to make of this fashion line.

Others, however, are all in on this colleciton.

Crunch wrap supreme > Supreme.

If you’re still on the fence on whether the clothes are hot, mild or meh, here’s how we rate them based on the Taco Bell hot sauce system!

CREDIT: Credit: Taco Bell

There’s this glamorous satin hoodie that adds shine to your post-Nachos Bell Grande bloat.

CREDIT: Credit: Forever 21

Is it just me or does it look like a bag of Takis?

A crunch bodysuit that’s giving me “Saved By The Bell” vibes.

CREDIT: Credit: Forever 21

This had to be designed by the same interior decorator who gave us The Max.

A hot sauce bodysuit.

CREDIT: Credit: Forever 21

And not even Flamin’ Hot Cheeto aka the GOAT Cheeto.

And a fire version… That isn’t much better.

Credit: Forever 21

The fashion equivalent of Oh No Baby! What Is You Doin???

A shirt that’s 100 percent cotton, and 200 percent sauce.

CREDIT: Credit: Forever 21

I actually can’t hate on this. Cut that bish into a crop top and I’m about it.

This neon windbreaker with “Taco Bell” written down the arms though?

CREDIT: Credit: Taco Bell

Imagine meeting a dude for a Tinder date and he rolls up wearing this. “Hey girl, guess where we’re going for dinner.” *Points to arms* I mean, I’d go and get some crunchy tacos, but that jacket would be a problem.

Wait. No. This Taco Bell logo hoodie is a bigger problem.

CREDIT: Credit: Forever 21

Me: “That sweater would look good on my bedroom floor. I mean, dumpster. It would look good in a dumpster.”

There’s a checkered crop top hoodie.

CREDIT: Credit: Forever 21

Pairs well with a scratched Madness CD and indigestion.

Then they went and dragged an innocent child into this.

CREDIT: Credit: Forever 21

Poor baby has no chance on the playground.

The Forever 21 x Taco Bell line is close to being sold out, with some pieces already gone. So if you’re on the side of history that’s all for this collab, you better get on it. Just be careful getting that Diablo sauce on your new hoodie. It stains.


READ: Move Over, Chihuahua… Taco Bell’s New Mascot Has Arrived

Are you pro or against the Forever 21 x Taco Bell line? Share this story with your friends and let them know!

Women Are Dragging Forever 21 By Their Strappy Yellow Bags For Sending Atkins Diet Bars In Their Bags

Fierce

Women Are Dragging Forever 21 By Their Strappy Yellow Bags For Sending Atkins Diet Bars In Their Bags

Our society is obsessed with diet culture. Often times, the quest for the “perfect summer body” or the most ideal figure can be very damaging to people dealing with weight loss and eating disorders. Further pushing of diet culture makes people negatively reflect on their body image — something that is more likely to create eating and anxiety disorders than to lose weight.

Another example of this ongoing issue popped up recently on Twitter and people are calling it a fatphobic attack on plus-sized women and a dangerous marketing ploy.

In a now-deleted tweet, Forever 21 shopper, Ganiella Garcia, shared that there was an extra item in her recent order from the shop.

Twitter / @wisekatya

She found that the clothing store had added a bonus sample of an Atkins bar to her order. The bars are from the special Atkins lines of low-carbohydrate snacks meant to help one follow the fad Atkins diet.

Garcia was upset and shocked that Forever 21 thought it was a good idea to add these to orders that were going to a plus-sized woman. She told Buzzfeed News about the incident, saying:

“I opened the bag and took the clothes out. Everything was fine. And then when I was trying things on, at the bottom there was a card and there was an Atkins bar in a little bag. It was very insulting, and honestly, I like shopping at Forever 21 — but I don’t feel comfortable buying clothes from a company that thinks I shouldn’t be the size that I am.”

Garcia went to Twitter with her story and soon found that she wasn’t the only one to receive the unwanted diet bar.

Twitter / @jessemarisaelao

Many women came forward to share that they were also recipients of these Atkins diet bars. Most people who experienced this extra item ordered from Forever 21’s plus-sized catalog but some bars ended up in orders sent to straight-sized customers too. This Twitter user shared an image of an order her mother placed. Sure enough, the same lemon Atkins bar is present in her order as well.

This tweet pointed out the dangerous message that is presented by sending unsolicited diet bars to their costumers.

Twitter / @theverbalthing

Twitter user, Samantha Puc, suggested that despite what their sizes may be, sending these bars to unaware customers with eating disorders could cause harm. Something as innocuous as a bar suggesting that they should lose some weight can trigger a bulimic or anorexic episode in someone working to overcome their eating disorder.

She went on to say more about how the clothing industry capitalizes on diet culture:

“Plenty of clothing companies monetize disordered eating and fatphobia to sell products, but this is a new level, Forever 21. Assuming this is a brand partnership with Atkins, is the money worth endangering the lives of your customers?”

Queer and Latinx Fat Story Teller, @MerQueenJude, also posted a response on her Instagram admonishing the clothing company for buying into fatphobic and dangerous marketing ploys at the expense of their customers.

“It is so dangerous to body shame and suggest that someone eat less or go on a diet,” she explained on her Instagram post. “You don’t know their history with food. As someone recovering from an ED, this would’ve set me back so far.”

Another Twitter user echoed Puc’s concern about the potential Forever 21 and Atkins partnership.

Twitter / @bronze_bombSHEL

Twitter user Shelby Ivey Christie pointed out that if this was meant to be a tie-in between the clothing company and the diet brand, it was done in a sloppy and tasteless manner. As she pointed out, the presence of the bars in predominantly plus-sized orders seems discriminatory and is defiantly distasteful.

It didn’t take long for Forever 21 to issue a statement defending themselves and reversing their stance on the diet bars.

Twitter / @TracyClarkFlory

A rep for Forever 21 responded with an official statement regarding the accusations of its costumers:

“From time to time, Forever 21 surprises our customers with free test products from third parties in their e-commerce orders. The freebie items in question were included in all online orders, across all sizes and categories, for a limited time and have since been removed. This was an oversight on our part and we sincerely apologize for any offense this may have caused to our customers, as this was not our intention in any way.”

While we’re glad that the potentially dangerous freebies will not be found in any unsuspecting packages from now on, we hope that Forever 21 learns from this misstep. When it comes to diet information and products, they should never be sent out unsolicited. Making observations about another’s body can have majorly unintended repercussions. Nobody should speak in a potentially negative way about another’s appearance or health. Diet and weight are personal, private and — frankly — no one else’s business.

Meet The Gracious Family That The Creator Of Taco Bell Ripped Off

Culture

Meet The Gracious Family That The Creator Of Taco Bell Ripped Off

Ugly Delicious / Netflix

Any foodie with a Netflix subscription is at least aware of the Netflix original docu-series “Ugly Delicious.” Each episode takes a cultural look at staple foods like pizza, fried rice, and tacos. Hosted by David Chang, each episode is essentially a visual essay of a taken-for-granted cuisine. The team travels to the birthplace of the food and sees how it’s evolved in its different iterations around the world.

During the taco episode, the all-male team travels to San Bernadino, California to Holland to Mexico to understand what makes a good taco. They even go to Taco Bell and the restaurant that “inspired” the franchise.

Along for the ride is taco expert and Mexican-American foodie Gustavo Arellano.

Netflix

We first see the team driving around Los Angeles past rows of food trucks. When asked what are the tell-tale signs that set apart one taco truck from another, Arellano gives these non-Spanish speakers these pro tips:

  1. Find a menu that includes words you’ve never seen before. That means the food will be regional and not mass-produced.
  2. Go where the “salsa game is strong.” Especially if they’re just giving away roasted serrano peppers.
  3. Look for the homemade tortillas. If you see a bag of mass-produced tortillas in sight, walk away.

Chang is a New Yorker. He didn’t get tacos until he rolled through Los Angeles.

Netflix

“This is definitely much better than the ‘Taco Night in America’ type of taco,” he proclaims after a single taco de camarones. That’s because Mexicanos run LA taquerías, Mr. Chang.

Eventually, Arellano takes us to ground zero of the Taco Bell franchise.

Netflix

After a quick trip to Taco Bell, Arellano, who authored “Taco USA,” takes viewers to the eatery that inspired a now global fast food franchise meant to represent Mexican cuisine.

Mitla Cafe’s home is San Bernardino, a community born out of being a road-side stop off Route 66.

The restaurant has been around since 1937.

Netflix

At this point, the country is just edging out of the Great Depression. San Bernardino was heavily segregated. Mexicans were only allowed to live on the west side of the city, where Mitla first opened its doors.

The real story of Taco Bell begins with Lucia Rodriguez.

Netflix

She had emigrated from Tepatitlán, México to California and brought her recipes with her. According to her grandson and now the owner of Mitla, Michael Montaño, “These are her recipes. Those are the things that were available to her: ground beef, cheddar cheese, tomatoes, and iceberg lettuce. She made it work.”

True to its original menu, Mitla has been a home base for immigrant assimilation.

Netflix

“When my grandmother opened the restaurant, she wanted to have American style food on the menu,” Montaño tells “Ugly Delicious.” “The first item on the menu is a T-bone steak.”

Mitla became a home base for the Mexican community to gather and strengthen. The story goes that the local activists that would take up booths at Mitla went on to form the Mexican Chamber of Commerce.

Taco Bell founder, Glen Bell, saw an opportunity and decided to steal the recipe.

Netflix

Bell would eat at Mitla every day after work, trying to deconstruct their taco. According to Gustavo Arellano’s book Taco USA, Bell befriended the staff and family at Mitla Cafe, eventually making his way into the kitchen to learn the family secrets.

Glen Bell was making hamburgers across the street, but the original McDonalds was creating competition.

Netflix

This guy was just looking for a way to make money. He knew how to make a hamburger, but McDonald’s was creating too much competition.

Bell opened up the first Taco Bell in Downey in 1962.

Netflix

With the start of a fast food franchise that would normalize and make Mexican food mainstream, Taco Bell was born. Now, the Montaño family recipes are met with criticism from Latinos who don’t know the story–that they serve fake Mexican food.

The original flavors, story, and heritage still reside in San Bernadino with the Montaño family.

Netflix

We are so glad Arellano asked Montaño, “How do you feel that your family’s recipe—your heritage—was taken by Glen Bell and turned into a multi-billion dollar empire?”

Montaño is ultimately proud that his family recipes have forever given America a little more flavor.

Netflix

“We don’t talk about it in the terms of what could have been or what he did to us or anything like that,” he tells Arellano. “It’s more of like look at our connection to the history of food in this country. When you hear stories of salsa being the No. 1 condiment, or that tortillas are right there next to the wonder bread … that’s what the country’s about.”

“That’s what the immigrant story is about—is assimilating but not only assimilating to the culture, but having that predominant culture assimilate some of your beliefs, some of what you do well and make it part of the general population.”

READ: Taco Bell Is Opening A Resort In Palm Springs And People Have Some Serious And Valid Questions

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