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Definitely NSFW! The Origin Of Mexican Swear Words Explained

Mexican swear words or groserías are some of the most powerful in the world. Seriously, if you yell at someone using Mexican insulting vernacular chances are you will get some respect. Like karate, groserías should only be used as a defense and never as an attack. Mexican Spanish has produced some very interesting and borderline poetic swear words, which are slowly but surely being incorporated into Spanglish and everyday conversation in the U.S. So you better be prepared!

Share this list only with those with whom you share a strong share of trust and camaraderie. And don’t ever share this with your madrecita santa unless you two are really, really into shared banter. Otherwise, she will lavar tu boca con jabón por pelado y majadero, mijo.

“Chinga tu madre”
When to use it: NEVER, EVER.

 

Credit: chInga tu madre. Digital image. Meme generator.

Chingar in this context means “to fornicate.” So you are really telling someone to go fornicate with their mom! It is beyond rude and it is the ultimate insult if you want to end a friendship forever. The word “chingar” comes from the gypsy slang čingarar, which means “to fight”. How did that derive into sex? Because us Mexicans are unpredictable and creative!

“Pendejo”
When to use it: when “stupid” is not enough

Credit: 9m0r6p. Digital image. MemeGen

The word “pendejo” is perhaps one of the most widely used in Mexican Spanish. It is derived from the Latin pectiniculus, which is used to describe pubic hair. Such an insult! No, really, pubic hairs are not pleasant in any scenario… pendejos.

“Cabrón”
When to use it: when someone is taking advantage of someone else, or when you want to call a friend in a fond manner (we know, it makes no sense)

Credit: cabron. Digital image. Yarokobu.

Cuenta la leyenda that in the past shepherds spend way too much time with their animals, so they would satisfy their carnal needs with them (it is a crime and it is called bestiality). Female goats’ genitalia were preferred by these pervs, so the male goats, or cabrones, would get pissed off and attack the humans. Hence the word. We do hope this origin story is mere cuento and not real at all. To be honest, this origin story is pretty creepy.

“Carajo”
When to use it: when you wanna say “damn it” or when you want to send someone to “la chingada” in a more subtle way

Credit: carajo. Digital image. Mira JEREZ

“Carajo” is literally the crow’s nest of a ship, the basket at the top of the mast. Just imagine the seasickness one must feel all the way up there. Young sailors, or those being punished, would be sent to this terrible spot. So in Spanish, you can send someone to “el carajo”, this ungodly basket at the mercy of the rough seas. The word can also be used to simply say “damn” or express disappointment.

“Chingada”
When to use it: always… when you are feeling bad (de la chingada) or when you want to get someone to F off… “vete a la chingada”

Credit: large. Digital image. We Hear It

This word is one of the most distinctive in Mexican Spanish. It basically is used to describe a place or existential state that sucks. It is used for almost everything… something sucks… “de la chingada”. Go to hell: “vete a la chingada”. This word is part of the national identity and basically a cultural treasure of sorts.

“Pinche”
When to use it: add an extra layer of nastiness with this adjective, as in “pinche pendejo”

Credit: significado-de-pinche-mexico. Digital image. Mexico mi pais.

It literally means “cook’s helper”, so the lowest rank in a kitchen. Mexican writer Jose Emilio Pacheco guessed that the use of the word in a derogatory way could be traced back to haciendas were the help was discriminated against. However, nothing is certain other than the fact that this word is like a magical spell that changes form according to the user’s need. Que pinche chistoso, no?

“Vale madres”
When to use it: when something terrible happens and things are beyond repair

Credit: valiomadresmeme. Digital image. Chilango

Mexicans have an obsession with using farts and mothers as an insult. “Vale madres” literally means “it went to hell” or, alternatively, “it does not matter” (see below). Mothers are sacred in Mexican culture, so just like swearing using God’s name is considered bad in Anglo countries, swearing using sacred madrecitas santas hermosas is like being rebellious and crass. Vale madres.

“Me vale madres”
When to use it: when you couldn’t care less

Credit: 200x200xfso0tr.jpg.pagespeed.ic.imagenes-memes-fotos-frases-graciosas-chistosas-divertidas-risa-chida-español-whatsapp-facebook. Digital image. Generador de memes

Another use of moms. This means “I couldn’t care less”, but in a very aggressive way. Like if someone breaks up with you but you wanna pretend like it is nothing, you would say “me vale madres”. We could tell Chabelo everyone on the Internet thinks he is the oldest person on Earth and he would reply: “Me vale madres”.

“Huevón”
When to use it: when calling someone “lazy bastard” is just not enough to describe how incredibly non caring and non energetic someone is

Credit: zpor-qlie-no-quieres-ser-mi-media-naranja-porque-medio-22530381 Meme. Digital image. Meme

There is no nice way of putting this: human testicles look like a pair of eggs. Huevón means “he whose testicles are so heavy that he can barely move”. Of course, popular lexicon has generated countless versions of this bad word. Such as…

… Que hueva”
When to use it: when you are tired beyond words; also when you want to describe a boring situation

Credit: 3570322. Digital image. Meme generator.

When one is so exhausted that one’s gonads feel too heavy to be lifted. “Hueva” is also used to describe boredom… if you wanna end one of those senseless fights or discussions, you can say “hueva” and just roll your eyes. You will get your message across, believe us.

“Pedo”
When to use it: when you or someone else has consumed an excess of alcoholic beverages

Credit: Pedos. Digital image. Tenor.

In Mexico farts equal drunks and anything alcohol related. Binge drinking is “irse de peda”. To be drunk is “estar pedo”. And, funny enough, if you have a problem you say “tengo un pedo enorme” or “I have a huge pedo”. According to linguists, the word is used because drunkards smell bad, like a flatulence. OK…. we guess it sort of makes sense.

“No mames”
When to use it: when you want to express surprise (wow), disgust (ew) or joy (yay). Really.

Credit: no-mames-qjlx3r. Digital image.

Just like “pinche”, this expression is used in a variety of ways. It literally means “do not suck”, as in “do not consume milk from the breast” or “do not perform fellatio” (sorry, we are trying to be as elegant as possible here). One of the possible origins of this expression is “do not act like a baby, do not suck milk from the nipple”, as in “grow the F up!”. But Mexicans are everyday poets and expand the expressive possibilities of a word to its maximum limit…. no mames.

Meet Manuel Mendoza, The Winner Of Netflix’s Cannabis Cooking Competition Show

Culture

Meet Manuel Mendoza, The Winner Of Netflix’s Cannabis Cooking Competition Show

lil_manofrom18th / Instagram

Netflix and Kelis teamed up to create a cooking competition show all about cannabis cooking. “Cooked with Cannabis” is giving cannabis chefs a chance to shine with some friendly competition and the ever-popular cannabis.

Kelis is here with a new kind of cooking competition show officially changing the game.

“Cooked with Cannabis” is elevating the use of cannabis in the kitchen. It is no longer something used by stoners and only stoners. “Cooked with Cannabis” makes cannabis a sophisticated and respectable ingredient in the kitchen. The show offers some insights as to the differences between different strains of pot that many of us just never understood.

The show has six episodes in the first season and there is a new cast of chefs every episode.

The premise of the show is three chefs battling it out for three judges to show what they can do with the cannabis they are given. The recipes look like culinary works of art and seem equally as appetizing. The winner of the episode is given $10,000 as a prize and that’s pretty grand.

One of the winners this season is Manuel Mendoza, a cannabis chef from Chicago.

Mendoza works for Herbal Notes, a Chicago-based cannabis collaborative project. According to the website, Herbal Notes hopes to destigmatize the practice of using cannabis in cooking by highlighting the medicinal properties of the natural ingredient. Herbal Notes is also trying to empower communities long vilified for their use of cannabis.

Mendoza won using the cannabis to create some deliciously relevant foods.

Mendoza won by giving the judges some pot leaf-shaped chilaquiles and marijuana-infused pupusas. The use of Mexican and Salvadoran foods not only highlights our community but also his own upbringing in Chicago as a Salvadoran kid. Mendoza is proud to say that he was raised by Pilsen, the famed Latino community in Chicago.

Congratulations, Mendoza. It is a victory well deserved.

Mendoza’s start in cannabis cooking came when he had a eureka moment with iced chocolate milk. The chef was fresh out of culinary school and was eager to try new things, including cannabis cooking. The cannabis cooking trend was just kicking off and he just wanted to play around. When he created that iced chocolate milk, Mendoza knew that he was on to something and the rest is his culinary career.

READ: Mexico’s Progressive Bill Legalizing Cannabis Stalled Again Because Of Pandemic

Google Launches Faces Of Frida So You Can Pass The Time Learning About The Artist’s Life

Culture

Google Launches Faces Of Frida So You Can Pass The Time Learning About The Artist’s Life

Google

Few artists have reached the level of fame as Frida Kahlo. The Mexican painter is more than an artist. Kahlo is a point of cultural pride that transcends nationality within the Latino community and unites Latino art lovers in their le of Latin American art. Now, Google, in the time of self-isolation, is giving everyone a chance to learn about the iconic painter.

Google wants to give everyone a chance to learn about Frida Kahlo with its online “Faces of Frida” exhibit.

Credit: Google

Anyone who visits the “Face of Frida” exhibit can browse through the artist’s incredible paintings. Kahlo is one of the most influential artists the world has ever known. Her fame and people’s admiration continue to this day with tributes still appearing around the world for the Mexican artist.

Viewers can decide which museum’s Frida Kahlo collection they want to explore.

Credit: Google

The exhibit is made possible by 32 museums from around the world collaborating to show Frida Kahlo’s impressive and iconic works of art. Museums across four continents shared Kahlo piece from their exhibits with Google to create an exhibit showing more than 800 paintings. Some of the museums include Museo Frida Kahlo in Mexico, Los Angeles County Museum of Art in the United States, Nagoya City Art Museum in Japan, Fundación MAPFRE in Spain, and Buenos Aires Graffiti in Argentina.

The interactive exhibit is perfect for all Frida Kahlo and art lovers alike. While 3.4 billion people in the world are on lockdown orders, the incredible virtual exhibit of Kahlo’s work gives people a chance to see works of art they haven’t been able to visit yet.

The exhibit is easy to navigate and some of Kahlo’s works have been collected into their own themed galleries.

Credit: Google

Kahlo is most famous for using her own life as the inspiration for her works of art. The artist often played with the themes of pain and death due to her own near-death experiences. Her tumultuous relationship with Diego Rivera influenced Kahlo’s work depending on where they were in their relationship. The couple was notorious for taking extra-marital lovers throughout their marriage.

“Faces of Frida” also offers art fans a chance to learn about Kahlo through editorial features.

Credit: Google

Kahlo was one of the most revolutionary women in the world. She moved through space unimpeded by society’s views on her gender and place in society. She was politically engaged and held onto a list of values that many still argue over today. Namely, there have been discussions and think pieces about the sudden commercialized usage of Kahlo’s image and what she might have to say about it. As someone who was opposed to capitalism, it seems safe to say she might not have appreciated herself being used for capitalistic gains.

You can visit “Faces of Frida” by clicking here.

READ: This LA Play Explores The Mystery Surrounding Frida Kahlo’s Death, Her Love Affairs, And Her Passion For Art