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Chicharito Defends Mexico Coach After Video Surfaces Of Fans Shouting Down Coach

Juan Carlos Osorio, the man currently at the helm of the Mexican national soccer team, is the latest fútbol coach to realize how much pressure one must endure at the head of “El Tri.” The Colombian has had mixed results since his tenure began in late 2015, and recent disappointments at the FIFA Confederations Cup and CONCACAF Gold Cup have led to increased scrutiny.

Barring an unexpected and historic collapse, Osorio has the Mexican team virtually qualified for the 2018 World Cup. Many would argue that was the job he was hired to do. Mexico fans clearly remember what happened before the 2014 World Cup: Mexico was minutes away from missing out on the World Cup, until a last-minute goal from the U.S. versus Panama — in their final qualifying match — allowed Mexico to enter a playoff and eventually book a ticket to Brazil.


CREDIT: Michael Regan – FIFA / Getty

However, Osorio has also frustrated peers, pundits and fans by employing a strategy in which he often rotates players. Osorio, a tactician, says it’s necessary not just for his game-to-game approach but for the health of his players. Critics say it leads to inconsistency on the field because the starting lineup is always in flux. Players say it gives them much-needed rest and a drive to compete for starting gigs.

When Mexico lost to Chile 0-7 at the Copa América Centenario last year, the historic scoreline instantly put a target on Osorio’s back. Despite the humiliating loss, Mexican soccer officials reiterated their support for Osorio and he was given time to work.

Now, after a one-sided loss to Germany at the Confederations Cup and a semi-final round elimination by Jamaica at the Gold Cup, patience for Osorio’s strategies has worn thin.

Journalist Tom Marshall posted this photo of angry fans shouting at Osorio after the loss to Jamaica.

A video of Osorio’s arrival in Mexico also surfaced on social media, showing several fans yelling at Osorio. One fan chanted “Fuera Osorio” while another yelled, “Vete a tu país cabrón.”

Javier “Chicharito” Hernandez, Mexico’s all-time leading goalscorer, took to social media to defend Osorio and reject the cynicism he feels from some Mexicans.

“I’m speechless after watching the video of Profe Osorio arriving in Mexico,” wrote Hernandez.

“It’s incredible. I’m speechless after watching the video of Profe Osorio’s arrival in Mexico. It made me embarrassed, angry, and even more, it made me very sad. I may regret what I’m going to say, but not even other coaches, who have behaved worse and have had similar results, have been received in that way.

Honestly, we have a lot to learn, we have a lot of things we need to improve because it’s not possible that a sport makes us act, react and behave the way it did on that occasion and others.

Cheer up Profe! They also wanted the all-time top scorer in Mexico out of the national team.

Cheer up Profe, they’ve also wanted the only player in history to win two Champions Leagues, who was captain of 3 World Cup squads, to be out of the national team.

Cheer up, because the greatest, and in my opinion, the best player in Mexican soccer history, Hugo Sánchez, they wanted him out of the national team during his playing days. They also fired him when Mexico didn’t qualify for the Olympics even when he wasn’t obligated to coach that team.

Cheer up Profe, because honestly in Mexico there are more of us who want to make the country better, who want to be better Mexicans, we want a better Mexico in all respects, and I know you want the same for our country even though you come from another one.”

The tweet, which has nearly 40k likes, included the hashtag #SomosMásLosBuenos

Diego Reyes, one of Chicharito’s teammates on the national team, also defended Osorio.

“How sad it is to see these types of insults. Look how far we’ve fallen, if everyone was as demanding about themselves as they are demanding with the Mexican national team, this would be a better country.”

Teammate Oribe Peralta also spoke out:

“It’s preferable to be on the side that is being criticized instead of being one of those timid souls who criticizes everyone else because they’re so afraid of being criticized.”

Despite the setbacks, it appears Osorio’s job is safe. Before the loss to Jamaica at the Gold Cup, Mexican Federation President Decio De Maria told ESPN they had confidence in Osorio: “We’re coming up to two years and we are increasingly convinced that he is the coach to lead this project and World Cup process.”

READ: Mexican Soccer Star Finds A ‘Border Wall’ At Toys R Us In Portugal

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You Can Help Save Indigenous Languages From Extinction By Downloading One Of These 5 Apps

Culture

You Can Help Save Indigenous Languages From Extinction By Downloading One Of These 5 Apps

joshuaproject / Instagram

For many of us, our ability to speak Spanish or Portuguese is a huge part of our Latinidad. But with millions of people speaking Indigenous languages in Latin America, we know this is far from the truth. Spanish is, of course, one thing that unites most of Latin America together, but it’s a language that was imposed on us. It’s one reason some Mexican writers have rejected Spanish to write in Indigenous languages. For those of us who are interested in learning Indigenous languages, technology has become a serious lifeline.

We already use apps for dating and social media to checking the weather or shopping, so why not use it to help us get in touch with our deeper identity?

Several apps have sprung over the last few years to help us learn the Indigenous languages of Latin America. If you’re looking to take on a new language, here are a few apps you should check out:

Náhuatl

Credit: Matthew Powell / Flickr

With an estimated 1.5 million speakers, Náhuatl is the most commonly spoken Indigenous language in Mexico. Yet despite its prevalence in rural Mexico, there are still few courses or resources available for learning it.

The digital app “Vamos a Aprender Náhuatl” (Let’s Learn Náhuatl) offers learners the chance to approach the language as spoken in the town of Acatlán, in the southern state of Guerrero. In a self-taught manner, you can learn the numbers, greetings, animals, body parts, fruits, plants, and some verbs. The app – which is in Spanish and Náhuatl – also features quizzes to help users retain their lessons.

Mixtec

Credit: @fonsecahendris / Instagram

Kernaia has also developed an app for learning Mixtec, a branch of Indigenous languages spoken by more than half a million people. The app allows learners to navigate through 20 language lessons which teach greetings, numbers, and colors. The lessons are all set in the Santa Inés de Zaragoza community in the southern state of Oaxaca, and the app teaches people about the culture and traditions of the community.

Purépecha

Credit: VillageBosque / Instagram

The Kernaia project says that its mission is to create “an ecosystem of digital content for Indigenous languages.” To move toward this goal, the organization has created a similar app for Purépecha, a language spoken by nearly 200,000 people in the western state of Michoacán.

After the passing of Mexico’s Indigenous language law in 2000, languages including Purépecha were given official status equal with Spanish in the areas where it is spoken. Digital learning aids such as those offered by Kernaia are vital to heightening awareness of both the Purépecha language and the culture of the Purépecha people, who often experience poverty and marginalization.

As well as teaching words related to daily activities, Kernaia’s website says that the app offers a journey into “the space where they take place: the family, the community, the kitchen, the field, the celebrations, and other elements that represent the town’s identity and enrich our cultural diversity.”

Habla Quechua

Credit: ilovelanguages / Youtube

Quechua’s one of the most widely spoken indigenous language in the Americas. PromPerú developed the Habla Quechua app “with the aim of inspiring Peruvian citizens and foreigners to use and take an interest in the Quechua language.” The app – which is available to English, French, German, Portuguese, and Spanish speakers – features quizzes and a live translator feature.

Duolingo

DuoLingo offers courses in more than 20 languages, including the Jopará dialect of Guaraní, which is spoken in Paraguay. There is also a course for Navajo that is currently in Beta. The app offers quizzes and immediate grading.

So what do you think? Are there any Indigenous languages you’d like to learn that don’t have an app yet?

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Culture

Keds Latest Designs Proves That Avoiding Cultural Appropriation In Fashion Is Totally Possible

Keds

It’s always really cool to see a big name brand embrace the art of our Latinidad. It’s like a nod to all of the great Latinx artisans who add beauty and color to our culture. In fact, seeing consumers enthusiastically welcome these goods feels like further validation. With this in mind, it makes this new collaboration all the sweeter for us art and fashion lovers.

Keds is collaborating with designers Thelma Dávila and Lolita Mia on a line inspired by the Latina-created brands.

Instagram / @Keds

In what the shoe company is calling a “collaboration fiesta,” Keds released three fun and vibrant new designs.

Some of the shoes borrow inspiration from Thelma Dávila’s colorful Guatemalan textiles. Alternatively, other pairs utilize Lolita Mia’s festive fringe as embellishments. These touches combine with Keds’ original platform shoes to make a unique product.

Of the partnership with these new brands, Keds’ website says:

“It’s so rewarding to be able to be a part of the professional and personal growth of women who decided to follow their dreams. Entrepreneurs (especially female ones) are always brave, they’re risk-takers that believe strongly in themselves. And we believe in them too. We’re so excited to introduce you to our latest for-women-by-women collaborations.”

The Thelma Dávila brand is named after its Guatemalan founder.

Keds

The company specializes in designing and crafting unique pieces by hand. Furthermore, their products utilize Guatemalan textiles, leathers and non-leather materials. Obviously, this collaboration is built on a solid relationship between the two brands. Since last year, Keds retail locations have carried Thelma Dávila bags and products in stores.

On their website, Keds said the design collaborations were intent on “taking geometric design and color cues from [Dávila’s] native culture, our classic Triple Kick gets transformed into a fiesta-ready standout.”

Founded by jewelry artisan and entrepreneur, Elena Gil, Lolita Mia is a Costa Rican accessory brand.

Keds

While studying abroad in Italy, Gil made a significant personal discovery. She realized that ethnic crafts and traditions were very alike across regions. Specifically, they were similar in cultural importance. In light of this, she decided to start her own brand. Lolita Mia’s handmade products embrace what Gil has coined a “Universal Ethnic Luxury.”

Of the collaboration with Lolita Mia, Keds’ website reads:

“[The] aesthetic shines through in these playful renditions of our platforms in the form of fun, festive fringe and punchy tropical shades.”

The Ked × Lolita Mia collaboration has two designs while the Ked x Thelma Dávila collab is made up of one.

Instagram / @lolitamiacr

“Triple Tassel” is a multicolored platform with purple, pink, orange and white tassels attached to the laces. “Triple Decker Fringe” is an off-white platform slip-on with multi-colored fringe and golden embellishments on top. The “Triple Kick” features a neutral platform with Guatemalan textile accents around the bottom.

Each design is priced at $70 a pair. Moreover, they are available exclusively on Keds’ website. Be sure to order yours today and add a little extra Latinx flare to your summer looks.

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