Culture

Here Are 11 Hilarious Lies That Your Mom Always Tells You, Yet She Swears She Never Lies

No matter how much your mom emphasizes that being dishonest and lying to people is wrong- truth is, she also lies (quite often without even realizing it). And here are just a few of your moms’ famous lies that never get old:

If there’s one thing your mom looooves to lie about, it’s the time of day, especially when she wakes you up early AF in the morning…

… which is why it’s almost impossible to sleep in during the weekends.

@always_skaterOn : Twitter
CREDIT: @ALWAYS_SKATERON / TWITTER

And if you get mad at her for lying to you, she’ll quickly respond with yet ANOTHER lie:

“Keep making that face y se te va quedar asi la cara por siempre.” 

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CREDIT: @ERIKA ANGEL / YOUTUBE

No, your face will not stay like that for the rest of your life.


In an effort to make things better, your mom will lie to you AGAIN and say:

 “Ven mija, I just want to talk.”


And she’ll say it in such a calm voice just to fool you.

And if she senses that you’re hiding something from her, she’ll trick you into spilling the beans by telling you:

“Just tell me the truth, I won’t get mad, I promise.”

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CREDIT: WE ARE MITÚ

LIES!! You know damn well she’ll get mad and will end up getting you in huuuge trouble.


Basically, the more your mom says she’s NOT going to do something, the more likely she WILL… so be careful.


It’s a TRAP! Don’t fall for it!!

And just to make you feel a little worse, she’ll then tell you:

“I neverrrrrr used to talk back and give my parents attitude.”


But truth is, she used to have more attitude with her parents than yourself.

Even on her good days, your mom will STILL lie to you and say:

“Un día alguien te va querer igual or más que yo te quiero.” 


…yet you’re still single AF. ?

So if you’re single and your mom calls you “handsome” or “chulo” ten times a day, then you KNOW she’s lying.


But at least she’s trying to boost your confidence.

When asking for permission to go out with friends, if your moms says “I’ll think about it,” chances are she’s lying.

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CREDIT: NBC / SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE

Nope, she’s not going to think about it. She already thought about it and guess what her answer is…NO.

So if you’re not out with your friends, you’ll end up getting dragged to hang out with your mom and her comadres. And if you ask her, “What time are we leaving?” she’ll hit you with this little lie:

“Ya nos vamos a ir.”


But TRUTH is: *5 hours pass and you’re still there*

And of course, the same lie applies when she goes shopping and tells you:

“I’ll be quick, I just need to buy one thing from the store.”

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CREDIT: WE ARE MITÚ

…but then she comes out of the store 7 hours later with a bunch of bags in her hand. Lies I tell you.

But it’s not like your mom lies to you on purpose just to hurt your feelings — that’s just how she is, and you wouldn’t change anything about her.?

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CREDIT: WE ARE MITÚ

Yeah, she might sprinkle a few lies here and there, but who doesn’t?


READ: Here’s Just How Dramatic Some Latina Moms Become When They Discover Their Kids Have Tattoos


What are your moms’ famous lies? Comment and hit the share button below!

Moms Are Sharing Videos Of How To Make Their Comida For Their College-Bound Kids After A Mom’s Burrito-Folding Video Went Viral

Culture

Moms Are Sharing Videos Of How To Make Their Comida For Their College-Bound Kids After A Mom’s Burrito-Folding Video Went Viral

Michelle Gonzaes / YouTube

Last week, California Polytechnic State University student, April Olvera posted a video sent to her by her mamá, and the video went viral, already wracking up nearly ten million views, and nearly one million likes in less than seven days.

Olvera, away at college, texted her mom, Silvia Dominguez, to say that she didn’t know how to fold a burrito, and her mom sent her a video that contained a soothing video-folding lesson.

While some couldn’t help but wonder why Olvera didn’t know how to fold a burro, her mamí’s special brand of cariño shown in the forty-second burrito-folding lesson was the focus of the comments that followed.

Other Latinas needed the lesson too!

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Another Latina Twitter user, couldn’t get over the way Olvera’s mother, Silvia, repeated the lesson.

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Two guys commented on Olvera’s mom’s soothing voice, but we think @carys_arsenic nailed it.

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And this guy too who points out Ms. Dominguez’s calm in the face of a world that seems to be coming apart at the seams.

Twitter

When Olvera told her mother that her video went viral and inspired so many positive comments, Dominguez said, “Maybe it’s not the burrito. Maybe it’s about family and love.”

Burrito-folding-lesson mom, Silvia Dominguez, speaks Spanish in the video, smiling the whole time, clearly happy to be able to help her daughter away at college with anything, using her own phone propped up on the counter to capture the lesson.

“Okay,” she says in Spanish, holding up a corn tortilla, “Imagine that this is my flour tortilla. Add what you’re going to use, fold it from this side, fold it from that side, and roll it. Did you see that?

And then she unrolls the burro and repeats the steps: It’s a circle. Fold it here, fold it here, and roll it. Nice! Okay, bye. I love you.”

We also like how Burrito-Folding-Lesson Mom is even helping grown-ass men.

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@rsencion
Twitter

And because imitation is the most sincere form of flattery, here’s a video made by the author for her son on his way to college in the fall.

Watch the video below.

READ: Yalitza Aparicio Brought Her Mother To The Oscars And Other Incredible Things Latinas Did Last Night

University Student Arrested For Creating Meme Account Calling Out New Government

Things That Matter

University Student Arrested For Creating Meme Account Calling Out New Government

Suchel 2.0 / Facebook

On the last day of 2019, Bolivian officials arrested a university student for creating a popular meme account that criticized the controversial change of government. Bolivia saw a change from long-beloved indigenous President Evo Morales to the self-declared Conservative Christian Interim President Jeanine Añez Chavez. The arrest of María Alejandra Salinas comes in the wake of rising concern of the stability of the democracy after military personnel violently ransacked President Morales’ home. Morales is currently living in exile in Mexico City, his new asylum home. Now, those who were concerned about the new right-wing government are troubled to learn of Salinas’s arrest in what they perceive as a violation of free speech. Salinas, herself, was worried before she was even arrested. She deactivated her account just days before her arrest for fear of her own personal safety after receiving numerous death and rape threats.

The new government actions are prompting civilian debate about whether it’s okay for the government to censor and arrest citizens for sharing differing political views.

María Alejandra Salinas ran the meme account Suchel, which reached over 10,000 followers until she shut it down.

CREDIT: GUSTAVO GARECA / FACEBOOK

A graduate student in feminist studies at La Universidad Mayor de San Andrés, Salinas decided to join the mass protests after the forced resignation of former Bolivian President Morales. She protested in her own way by creating a digital meme account called Suchel that garnered 10,000 followers since Morales’ exile on Nov. 10. If you’re reading this, you probably already understand the art of the meme. Using humor to give cutting insight into political opinions, #Suchel became emblematic of an Internet subculture of Bolivia’s pro-Morales, pro-Indigenous movement.

The government’s move to arrest Salinas only seems to validate Suchel’s followers’ concerns: that the state is seeking to maintain its power by any means necessary, including violating free speech rights.

Others are celebrating the arrest of Salinas, calling her a “digital warrior” seeking to “destabilize the government of our President Jeanine Añez.”

CREDIT: SUCHEL 2.0 / FACEBOOK

A Facebook group called “¡El 21-F SE RESPETA!” that had reached an equal size to Suchel’s leftist group is celebrating her arrest. The right-ist group seems to also employ the same use of memes to spread their political ideology. Still, members are celebrating Salinas’s arrest, claiming that she “comes from a bourgeois family that enjoys the honey of capitalism and defends socialism.”

Meanwhile, the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights (CIDH) reported that a bot campaign was employed by far-right government factions to influence public opinion in their favor. The CIDH found that 68,000 fake accounts posted over 1 million tweets during a week-long period before, during, and after the coup. Suchel became one of the few authentic informative accounts that indigenous and liberal Bolivians could rely on. 

“They say that I promote hate, indoctrinate people,” Salinas later wrote in a social media post. “This is just a page that doesn’t even reach 10 percent of the population in Bolivia. I have no power over people,” she added. 

According to Salinas, four men physically assaulted her and threatened to rape her if she didn’t give them her phone password.

CREDIT: @WYATTREED13 / TWITTER

Four men who knew that Salinas was the Suchel administrator ganged up on her and physically held her down in front of two police officers. When she refused to give them her cell phone code, they attempted to rape her. Later, when she confronted the police officers who “did nothing,” they told her “it was my fault because I had not listened to them,” according to a shocking social media post in Spanish (pictured above). Salinas was already the victim of sexual assault and death threats and deserved protection rather than persecution. On Dec. 28, Salinas announced that she would be shutting down the Suchel accounts for fear of her and her family’s safety. “Due to the lack of guarantees, I decided today to close Suchel on Facebook, at least until I am sure that my life and that of my family is not at risk,” Salinas posted to Suchel, according to Pagina SieteThree days later, she was arrested.

In a public statement in Spanish, CIDES demanded that “the corresponding authorities give the unrestricted respect for [Salinas’] rights during the legal process that is being carried out and taking into account the risks that due to the gender condition usually involve in these cases,” according to a local outlet.

Already, Suchel 2.0 accounts have popped up on several social media platforms.

CREDIT: @PAGINA_SIETE / TWITTER

The government’s attempt to control the online narrative of its administration’s rise to power and subsequent human rights violations appears to be unsustainable. While Salinas remains detained by authorities disdainful of her political views, Bolivians continue to raise their voices and seek community on and offline.

READ: An Angry Group Of Anti-Morales Protesters Attacked This Bolivian Mayor Ripping Off Her Clothes And Cutting Her Scalp