#mitúVOICE

This Mom Forgot To Turn Off The Stove De Los Frijoles And Her Reaction Is Priceless

There’s nothing more stressful than leaving the house and suddenly realizing that you left los frijoles prendidos! Rigoberto Palomo captured the moment his mom realized she forgot to turn off the stove and her state of panic is all of our moms… y todo por unos frijoles!

Her first reaction is…“¡No puede ser dios mío de mi vida!”

200-22
CREDIT: SENORA ACERO / TELEMUNDO

Because there’s nothing worse.

Her kids then start to criticize her driving, which makes her snap…”¡No me stresses más de lo que ya voy estresada!”

200-23
CREDIT: NOVELA LOUNGE / GIPHY

After which her son responds, “Todo por unos frijoles.”

But really it’s a huuuge deal as she explains…”¿Sabes cuando se queman los frijoles qué pasa?”

tumblr_nbr6bxycnv1tfksieo1_500
CREDIT: MI CORAZON ES TUYO / TELEVISA

If you didn’t already know…”¡Se apesta, la casa, todo!”

So the only thing this mom could do was pray…”Ay diosito santo ya han de estar biénnn quemados.”

200-24
CREDIT: GIPHY

Check out her full meltdown here!

WATCH: When Vines About Latina Moms Are Way, Way Too Real

Do you relate to this kind of stress? Hit the share button below! 

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Latinas On Instagram Are Getting Real About How The Cost Of Mental Health Impacts Them

Fierce

Latinas On Instagram Are Getting Real About How The Cost Of Mental Health Impacts Them

Scott Olson / Getty

Sadly, while therapy should be accessible to everyone not everyone has access to it. In fact, oftentimes regular therapy can come at quite the price. And while recent medical studies have shown that current societal pressures have caused Latinas in particular to experience high levels of stress, it doesn’t look like that is changing. With insurance companies often refusing to consider mental health benefits as part of their plans many of us are left to deal with our mental burdens all on our own.

To help, we recently asked Latinas for advice on how to get therapy and the responses were pretty helpful.

Here are the top takeaways.

Some institutions charge less for students.

“Always google training centers and universities for affordable therapy. Often students need to complete x amount of hours with patients and they charge a fraction of the cost. In San Francisco “The Liberation Institute” is a great resource.” –citybythebea

English/Spanish bilingual options are pretty available.

“Hi! I am an NY licensed (Queens based) English/Spanish bilingual clinical psychologist. I offer sliding scale therapy on Zoom based on whatever the patient is able to pay. My mission in this field is to make therapy possible for as much of our gente as possible and remove the notion that therapy is only for affluent White people. I am happy to chat with anyone that’s interested in learning more about therapy, mental health, or even working together.” –afuentes5

Many therapists don’t take insurance.

“It’s frustrating that most therapists don’t take insurance.” – jackelyn.v

It might take some time to find the right therapist but hang in there!

“What’s horrible is that even when you can afford it, it can often be quite difficult finding the proper therapist. It took me years to realize mine was not helping me and that I had to search for a better one.”- __soul

Sometimes video chats can be cheaper!

“Theres an app that charges $35 a wk for video chat with a therapist. If im not mistaken, its as many video chats as u want.” –xtabayfour

Some therapists provide a sliding scale.

“Also, therapists charge $80-$200 for several reasons. Cost of living, licensing, business expenses, their own insurance. Many times, clients may miss sessions for different reasons, therefore this can impact the flow of money. People spend that amount to get their hair done, nails, buy shoes, with no question. All this to say, you can get the help for your price point. Don’t give up trying! Call 211 for assistance too.” – missblovely

You might be able to get therapy through your insurance after a certain amount of time.

“If you have health insurance (another privilege, I know), you can get therapy through your insurance. I didn’t know this until 2 years ago when I read needed therapy but didn’t have the resources. You’ll do an intake to determine what you need (Eg. Counseling for anxiety and depression) and then have access to a whole network of providers for a fraction of the cost. Sometimes only $25/session! Mental health is healthcare!” – _devinjones

Don’t give up on therapy!

“It really depends on the type of insurance you carry. More and more employers are adding behavioral benefits. So do some research and ask HR about your benefits, since many of times they aren’t properly explained. Also, look into community health centers. Some therapist now offer sliding scales too, so don’t give up. Olisha Hodges, serves Alameda County. She is awesome! Also, google, Psychology Today, you can do a search and look through a list of specialist in your area.” – julisssac

BUT know that giving up certain luxuries for the sake of your mental health might be worth it.

“You are correct it should not be luxury items! As a therapist, I offer sliding scale rates. However even with a full case load of clients, as a therapist I cannot afford to live to pay double rent (my apt and office rent) my licensing, insurance, food, bills, plus the 10+ hours I spend a week doing my clients notes (they are not paid hours.) as someone mentioned in the comments $40 was still too expensive for sessions. I respect that, I was a Medicaid client when I used to get therapy as a student. Insurance companies do not respect our work and pay us very little that can barely afford my private practice. So the system is horrible and needs to change. I also know people who resent paying certain prices to therapists but then spend much more on yoga sessions, nails, hair, drinks, etc. so a lot of people don’t see therapy as a priority. I am happy that many people posted all these fabulous affordable recourses.” – lemonbalm333

In-network therapists will charge your copay.

“In-network therapists charge your copay which varies from $20-50 on average. There are also normally sliding fee scales which are based on your income so the amount you pay could be (depending on the therapist) zero. Also, with some employers, there are EAP (employee assistance programs) which offer short term therapy for free 5-10 sessions depending on the contractual agreement between the employer and EAP. You can choose to keep seeing that same therapist as well for a cost. Services such as @openpathpsychotherapy have therapists that charge a lower fee than what they normally would. All this to say, the options are out there. It may be a little scary on what to do or choose, but help is out there with low fees.” –missblovely

When it comes to financial compensation your therapist might be flexible.

“I remember after my last baby I needed therapy desperately and the receptionist said it would be $140 each visit and I sobbed and was ready to walk out because we couldn’t afford that, we’d just bought a new house, new car & added a 3rd child to our family. I tried to see if I could just go once a month but my therapist said she’d like to see me every week. The receptionist came back and said it’s only $40 which was still more than I’d like to spend but it was much more manageable than $140.”- jesslynne618

There’s help for every budget.

“Many can start with EAP offered by their employer; some offer more than the standard 3 sessions. EAP can also assist with referring you to a more long-term provider based on your needs & $$. They can also research therapists on psychology today as some mention their prices & offer a sliding fee scale. @openpathpsychotherapy is another program that requires client membership to access therapists that charge $30-60/session. There are various options. Speaking as a therapist, one may charge based on their yrs or level of experience, specific trainings, etc. Just as physicians, we are licensed to diagnose & treat. As with such, there are measures that must be taken to ensure the best level of treatment (to each his own price range). Clients aren’t limited to paying large amounts, especially in this era of online therapy. There’s help for every budget. Dialing 2-1-1 is also helpful to explore what’s offered in your area.” – _sunshineof_kc

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

A New Study Shows That Diehard Soccer Fans Are Putting Themselves At A Risk Of A Heart Attacks From Stress

Entertainment

A New Study Shows That Diehard Soccer Fans Are Putting Themselves At A Risk Of A Heart Attacks From Stress

Unsplash

That fútbol stress is real you guys, like, physically real. A study revealed that soccer fans experience such intense levels of physical stress while they watch their team, they could be putting themselves at risk of a heart attack. You read that right. Fútbol fans get so invested in their team’s games that they are putting themselves at physical risk.

They don’t call it ‘la pasión’ for nothing. 

Growing up Latino, you definitely jumped when your dad and tíos got over-excited screaming “GOL” during fútbol matches.  Eventually, we joined in. Now, it turns out that the stress and the nerve-wracking anticipation of what’ll happen next are actually damaging. Like, for real.  A study by the University of Oxford suggested that fans of soccer are putting themselves under some serious stress when they watch their team.

The Oxford study tested saliva from Brazilian fans during their historic loss to Germany at the 2014 World Cup.

The study found levels of the hormone cortisol rocketed during the 7-1 home defeat in the semi-final.

Particularly devoted fans are more at risk of experiencing dangerous levels of the ‘fight or flight’ hormone cortisol.

Cortisol is a hormone commonly associated with stress. ‘Fans who are strongly fused with their team – that is, have a strong sense of being ‘one’ with their team – experience the greatest physiological stress response when watching a match,’ Dr. Martha Newson, a researcher at the Centre for the Study of Social Cohesion, University of Oxford, told BBC. ‘Fans who are more casual supporters also experience stress, but not so extremely.’ This study was published in the journal Stress and Health.

This increase in blood pressure and strain on the heart can be very dangerous.

The researchers found no difference in stress levels between men and women during the game, despite preconceptions men are more “bonded to their football teams”.

Raised cortisol can also give people a feeling of impending doom.

This feeling of doom can be defined as a sense that their life is in danger or they are under attack. Previous research has shown an increase in heart attacks among fans on important match days, whether supporting club or country. Prolonged high levels of cortisol can: constrict blood vessels, raise blood pressure and damage an already weakened heart.

There are many health conditions tied to extreme stress that hardcore football fans should be aware of. 

While cortisol is essential to responding to life’s daily stresses, too much cortisol over time can result in a suppressed immune system (more coughs and colds and even allergies), weight gain, and heightened blood pressure with a significant risk of heart disease. Bottom line, all this soccer-induced stress can be pretty dangerous.

In their study, the University of Oxford researchers tracked cortisol levels in 40 fans’ saliva before, during and after three World Cup matches

The most stressful by far was the semi-final. “It was a harrowing match – so many people stormed out sobbing,” Dr Newson told BBC. But the fans had used coping strategies such as humor and hugging to reduce their stress, bringing it down to pre-match levels by the final whistle.

It’s not all bad news though, experts suggest that these findings might be helpful in identifying fans who are at risk. 

From our research, we may be better equipped to identify which fans are most at risk of heart attacks,’ says Newson. ‘Clubs may be able to offer heart screenings or other health measures to highly committed fans who are at the greatest risk of experiencing increased stress during the game.’

The findings could also be relevant to improving crowd management strategies. 

Passionate soccer fans around the world have been known to engage in violent behaviors, such as hooliganism and other aggressive clashes. The findings could also be relevant to improving crowd management strategies.

The study ‘Devoted fans release more cortisol when watching live soccer matches’ can be read in the journal Stress and Health.

READ: These American Futbolistas Explain Why They Chose Mexico’s Pro League Over MLS

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com