Culture

Here Are Some Funny Ways Mexicans Have Upped Their Security Systems

So you don’t want to get robbed, but you’re too cheap to buy a security system. Well, here are some creative ways to make sure you keep those ratas out.

Plant nopales inside your walls.

Credit: @czamora2816 / Instagram

They might get over the wall, but they’ll regret it instantly.

Buy resorteras for all your kids.

Credit: @eddygalicia45 / Instagram

You’re probably gonna need new windows though.

Hire a velador to watch over your stuff.

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Credit: iStock

You can trust Don Gaspar… to fall asleep every night.

Get a “Beware of Dog” sign.

Credit: @caseyfia / Instagram

Maybe it’ll boost her confidence. Maybe.

Make sure you have the biggest chismosa as your neighbor.

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CREDIT: TARINGA.NET

She’ll stop any burglar in his tracks… and tell him all your secrets.

Hang saints and crucifixes all over your house.

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Credit: iStock

It might not stop them from robbing you, but at least they’ll feel really guilty about it.

If you don’t have barbwire, make your own.

Broken Glass
Credit: mitú

It works because they’ll immediately know how broke you are.

Put up a Donald Trump sign.

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CREDIT: NEWSON6.COM

Cause nobody fucks with the crazies.

Put a cut-out of Vicente Fernández on your front porch.

Chente
Credit: @recordstorefairy57 / Instagram

It’ll bring all the burglars to their knees outside your house.

Blast “La Macarena” on repeat.

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Día de #FlashBack y lo hacemos con la memorable canción "La Macarena", tema compuesto por Los del Río, incluido en el album "A mí me gusta" de 1994 y supuso un éxito internacional en 1995, 1996 y 1997, y continúa teniendo un seguimiento de culto. Es considerada como una de las canciones más emblemáticas de la música de baile de 1990. La canción se ubica en el puesto número 7 en el Billboard Top 100, en el puesto número 1 Latin Songs de Billboard y además es la canción dance de Billboard y una de las seis canciones en idiomas extranjeros que ocupa la posición Nro. 1 desde que comenzó la Era Moderna del Rock de 1955. #Entretenimiento #history #music #song #LaMacarena #LosDelRio #Recuerdos #VitaminaG

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Trust me, it’s torture. I mean sure, it’s fun… for like a minute… when you’re 12… in the 90s.

Hire a Curandera to get rid of evil spirits.

Curandera
CREDIT: Larry Lamsa / FLICKR

She’ll get rid of all the malas vibras… and your place will smell like sage.

Get a Chupacabra.

Evil cartoon chupacabra. Vector clip art illustration with simple gradients. All in a single layer.
CREDIT: LULULOLLI.COM

Oh wait, never mind, this thing only scares goats… and isn’t real.

Add more frijoles to your diet.

Frijoles
CREDIT: LIGHTERSIDEOFREALESTATE.COM

The nuclear option. This will keep EVERYONE out. Nice knowing’ ya!

READ: Moments You Know are Too Real If You Were Raised By Abuelita

Well, there you go, you’re all taken care of. What else would you do to keep your place safe? Let us know in the comments below!

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Four Mexican Children Have Been Nominated For The Children’s Peace Prize And Here’s Why They Each Deserve To Win

Things That Matter

Four Mexican Children Have Been Nominated For The Children’s Peace Prize And Here’s Why They Each Deserve To Win

Yasin Yagci / Getty Images

Mexico is celebrating four compassionate children who have each been nominated for a prestigious international award, for their dedication to solving issues within their own communities.

Three kids from Oaxaca and one from Sinaloa have been nominated for the International Children’s Peace Award – which is award to children from around the world who have made an effort to promote the rights of children and improve the situation of vulnerable minors.

Each of Mexico’s four nominees have done so much for their communities – and the world at large – that it’s going to be a close contest to decide who is the ultimate winner.

Four kids from Mexico are in the running for a prestigious international peace award.

Among 138 children from 42 countries, four Mexican kids have been nominated for the International Children’s Peace Award, which is awarded to minors who have made an effort to promote the rights of children and improve the situation of vulnerable minors.

The award comes with a €100,000 (about $117,000 USD) prize which can be used to invest in the solutions they’ve been championing. In fact, one of last year’s winners was climate change activist Greta Thunberg and peace advocate Divina Maloum from Cameroon.

On this occasion, Mexico’s nominees are counting on the win and include three nominees from Oaxaca and one from the state of Sinaloa.

Each of the children nominated have done incredible work to help solve issues in their communities.

In order to be nominated for the award and to be considered for the top prize, children must demonstrate their commitment to making a “special effort to promote children’s rights and better the situation of vulnerable children,” according to the Children’s Peace Prize website.

It goes without saying that each of Mexico’s four nominees have already checked off each of those requirements, with each of them making major advancements in issues that affect their communities, their country, and children from around the world.

In fact, the issues this group of children have been taking on range from combatting bullying and domestic violence, to increasing access to education, protecting young women and girls from endemic violence, and combatting the global Covid-19 pandemic.

One nominee from Oaxaca founded her own foundation to help advance the issues she cares about.

In an interview with Milenio, Georgina Martínez, 17, said that the award represents a great opportunity.

“This year we are among the 142 nominees from 42 different countries and I believe that without a doubt there is a commitment from all of us as Mexican children and young people to win it to continue fighting for our dreams,” she said.

Martínez, who won the national youth award in 2017, has been working for the rights of children and young people for 10 years through various campaigns, such as “Boys and Girls to the Rescue”, which focused on helping vulnerable minors combat bullying and domestic violence. She also supported the Nutrikids campaign that fed minors in precarious situations, worked to build classrooms in impoverished communities, and has also been a speaker at various conferences.

“My activism began when I was 9 years old, when I participated in the ninth parliament of the girls and boys of Mexico, where I was a children’s legislator. We spent a week at the Chamber of Deputies to work in favor of children’s rights. There I realized that my voice could be heard and that I could be the voice of many children who perhaps did not have access to many of their rights such as education and health,” she told Milenio.

Young Georgina Martínez is in her last year of high school, and she has in mind to continue working in the present and the future to continue being a person and agent of change.

Martínez’s brother is also in the running for his work against the Covid-19 pandemic.

Jorge Martínez, the 13-year-old brother of Georgina, considers it a great honor to represent Oaxaca in the contest.

“I was nominated for my masks project, which consists of using 3D printing to print universal headbands and make acrylic masks, which I donate to hospitals,” he told Milenio.

“I started by making 100 masks, which I financed with my savings, and donated them to the children’s hospital to help hospitalized children so that they wouldn’t be infected with Covid-19. The project went viral allowing me to grow the project and it soon gained international attention,” he added.

Many of his neighbors and friends consider him to be an actual genius but he’s far too modest to take on that title. He said that “the truth is, all this technology is something that I like a lot and it’s fun to be able to work in fields that you enjoy.”

Martínez also shared his plans for the future, telling Milenio that he’d love to move to China to be able to work in robotics and engineering.

Oaxaca also has a third nominee in the global contest.

Oaxaca’s third nominee for the prize is a young ballet dancer, activist, and storyteller – Aleida Ruiz Sosa – who is a defender of women’s rights. She’s currently studying online as she finishes high school and plans to pursue a law degree, in addition to advancing her dance career.

She’s been a longstanding voice for women.

“Since I was very young I have worked hard to help my community. I have a collection of stories called “Rainbow”, that speaks out about violence against women. In fact, I worked with the Attorney General of Oaxaca, and the main thing is that all the proceeds from the sale of these stories will go to the young victims of femicide,” she told Milenio.

Also nominated is 16-year-old Enrique Ángel Figueroa Salazar of Mazatlán, who is passionate about children’s rights and wishes to change local, federal and global societies so that children can live a life free of violence.

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A Mexicana Just Broke A World Record By Making The Fastest Ascent Of The Earth’s Three Highest Mountains

Fierce

A Mexicana Just Broke A World Record By Making The Fastest Ascent Of The Earth’s Three Highest Mountains

Joe Mitchell / Getty

Mexican climber Viridiana Álvarez Chávez, might just one of the few people in the world to know what it feels like to actually be on top of the world.

Recently, the climber managed to scale three of the world’s highest peaks to break the Guinness World Records title. And she did it all in under just two years.

Incredibly, Viridiana climbed to the top of the three highest mountains in a year and 364 days.

According to the Guinness World Records, Viridiana’s quest to break the record started on May 16, 2017, with Everest (8,848 meters; 29,029 feet high), followed by K2 (8,611 meters; 28,251 feet) on July 21, 2018, and ended at Kangchenjunga (8,856 meters; 28,169 feet) on May 15, 2019.

Viridiana is the first Latin American to climb K2, the world’s second-highest mountain. To celebrate her amazing accomplishments, Viridiana was honored with a remote ceremony in which Raquel Assis, the Senior Manager of Guinness World Records Latin America Records Management Team, also attended.

Speaking about her accomplishments, Assis congratulated Virdiana saying “We continue to inspire the world through our record holders. Records motivate people to recognize their potential and look at the world differently.”

Before Viridiana, the Guinness World Records title was held by South Korean climber Go Mi-Sun who climbed the three mountains in two years and two days.

Viridiana says her next mission is to climb the 14 highest mountains in the world which would make her the first North American to do so.

Besides being a climber, Viridiana is a public speaker who encourages young people to break standards. Her talks emphasize the importance of accomplishing goals through emotional intelligence, positivity, discipline, and consistency.

“My career as a mountaineer started with an unusual and inspirational purpose: a simple personal challenge to exercise, but I ended up giving up my office job; risking comfort to experience the magic of the mountains, Viridiana told Guinness Book of World Records. “It was proof that dreams do not have to be lifelong dreams and that anyone who sets them can achieve even what are considered ‘unattainable goals,’ such as breaking a world record.”

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