entertainment

Here’s How Twitter Reacted To The Pope’s Super Bowl Message

YouTube

Last night, while the U.S. tuned into the biggest night in football, Pope Francis used the moment to speak about the importance of sports, rules, and unification in a poignant message seen by millions.

Fox delivered the Pope’s commercial of sorts (minus the big budget) a couple of hours before the Super Bowl, which is the first time the Vatican has ever released a message during this kind of sporting event.


He spoke in Spanish —which was then translated into English on his Instagram page — saying:

“Great sporting events like today’s Super Bowl are highly symbolic, showing that it is possible to build a culture of encounter and a world of peace. By participating in sport, we are able to go beyond our own self-interest — and in a healthy way — we learn to sacrifice, to grow in fidelity and respect the rules. May this year’s Super Bowl be a sign of peace, friendship and solidarity for the world. Thank you! #superbowl”

Did people like it? Let’s just say most felt #blessed.





We wonder who the Pope was rooting for during the Super Bowl… Hmm.


READ: pope francis considering a small step that could eventually lead to female priests

The Cuban-American Artist That Made This Controversial Trump Piece Is Saying He's Not Sorry About It

Politics

The Cuban-American Artist That Made This Controversial Trump Piece Is Saying He’s Not Sorry About It

DER SPIEGEL/ILLOZ.COM

You might have never heard of Edel Rodriguez before but chances are you’ve seen his work on any number of magazines over the years. The 45-year-old Cuban-American artist’s provocative work has caught the attention of fans and critics alike, but his most recent contribution to magazine Der Spiegel, a German publication with a circulation of around 1 million, has stirred controversy and heated debate.

The cover of Der Spiegel features President Trump holding the Statue of Liberty’s head as if it was beheaded.


According to BBC News, Edel Rodriguez said the image depicts Trump’s “beheading of democracy.”

The cover was inspired by President Trump’s controversial “immigration ban.”


For Rodriguez, the Statue of Liberty symbolizes the importance of immigration in U.S. history — an important theme in his work.

View this post on Instagram

a cover I illustrated 20 years ago #ERcovers

A post shared by Edel Rodriguez (@edelrodriguez) on


Rodriguez designed this cover for Time magazine 20 years ago.

Edel Rodriguez created the Der Spiegel cover to compare ISIS to President Trump, both of which he considers to be extremists.

The Washington Post reports that Edel Rodriguez, who fled Cuba in 1980 when he was 9 years old, was “angered” by President Trump’s immigration “ban.”

The Der Spiegel cover isn’t the first time Edel Rodriguez has drawn inspiration from President Trump.


This Time cover highlighted a tumultuous time in Trump’s campaign last August. He had just replaced his campaign manager with Kellyanne Conway and brought Stephen Bannon aboard. At the time it appeared that Trump’s ship was sinking, however, this ultimately proved wrong.

Edel’s “Meltdown” motif was updated a few months later after Trump’s campaign suffered another major hit.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BLgK1tJhduN/?taken-by=edelrodriguez


This cover came shortly after the leaked audio between Donald Trump and Billy Bush surfaced, and around the same time as the disastrous final debate. Polls at the time suggested Trump’s chances to win the presidency were very slim. Again, this proved wrong.

Edel Rodriguez’s work has been featured on the cover of Der Spiegel before. The image featured a familiar face.


Yep, Donald Trump. This cover was released a few days after the November elections and features the title: “The End Of The World (as we know it).”

Though Rodriguez’s design for Der Spiegel has drawn a lot of criticism, the Cuban-American artist defends his choice.


Rodriguez defended himself on Instagram, saying, “history has shown that shedding light on hate is better than hiding it so here you go.”

Rodriguez has his own reasons for his disdain of Trump’s policies, not the least of which is that he is a Cuban refugee.


“I don’t want to live in a dictatorship,” Rodriguez told the Washington Post. “If I wanted to live in a dictatorship, I’d live in Cuba, where it’s much warmer.”


READ: In Protest Against Trump’s Immigration Ban, 1,000 NYC Bodega Owners Closed Up Shop For A Day

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