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Bruno Mars Was Slamming Down Those Who Say He Changed His Name Because He’s Ashamed Of Being Latino

Singer Bruno Mars, born Peter Hernandez, has been the subject of rumors that he took his stage name because he’s not proud of his Puerto Rican heritage – but he’s setting the record straight. In a new interview with Latina magazine, he gets candid about what it’s been like growing up with multiple identities and the realities of being Latino.

“Growing up in Hawaii, there are not too many Puerto Ricans there,” Bruno said in the interview. “Because of my hair, they thought I was black and white.”

TBT

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The 31-year-old is completely owning his legal name, Peter Hernandez, and his Puerto Rican heritage.

He says the insinuation that he changed his last name is insulting to him, especially considering he was named after his father.

Mi Padre

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“My last name is Hernandez,” the singer said. “My father’s name is Pedrito Hernandez, and he’s a Puerto Rican pimp. There’s no denying that. My dad nicknamed me Bruno since I was 2 years old. The real story is: I was going to go by ‘Bruno,’ one name. Mars just kind of came [through] joking around because that sounds bigger than life. That was it, simple as that.” His dad was a pimp… Say what? Well, he definitely had style.

As you can see, Bruno resembles his dad a lot. He said his dad’s style and demeanor totally influenced him. That Latino flashy-yet-smooth aesthetic is very apparent in Bruno’s “24K Magic” video.

On stands this Friday. Ya boys on the cover of @rollingstone. Thank you Mark Seliger and Josh Eells #24kmagic

A video posted by Bruno Mars (@brunomars) on


“He’s an old-school working musician, so that’s where the pinky rings come from, the patent-leather shoes, the suits, and the pompadour,” Mars said. “It all stems from watching my father. I remember at the time, me and my sisters would be a little embarrassed when he would take us to school in his big-ass Cadillac. No one had Cadillacs in Hawaii. But my dad would show up in some boat-looking Caddy wearing some silky shit, and we’d run out into the car as soon as possible. And here I am wearing the swap-meet gold, driving Cadillacs.” Swap-meet gold!? We love that!!

Growing up with a Puerto Rican/Jewish dad and a Filipino/Spanish mom, Bruno said his identity, although blurry at times, has always been intact. He’s now hoping to inspire others to own all of their racial and ethnic identities.

Been trill

A photo posted by Bruno Mars (@brunomars) on


“There are a lot of people who have this mixed background that are in this gray zone,” Bruno said. “A lot of people think, ‘This is awesome. You’re in this gray zone, so you can pass for whatever the hell you want.’ But it’s not like that at all. It’s actually the exact opposite.”

Bruno said that the universal sound in his music, which is influenced by Latin, soul, and hip-hop, is a reflection of his hope that people can relate to one another through their individual experiences.

“I hope people of color can look at me, and they know that everything they’re going through, I went through. I promise you.”

Mars Has Landed #SB50

A photo posted by Bruno Mars (@brunomars) on


Bruno said that his music isn’t aimed at one kind of demographic. “How are you going to tell me that this song that I’m writing is only going to be catered to Puerto Ricans or to white people or only Asian people?” Mars said. “How are you going to tell me that? My music is for anybody who wants to listen to it.”

That’s not all Bruno Mars had to say. Click here to head over to Latina to read more of his interview.

READ: 13 Celebs You Probably Didn’t Know Were Afro-Latino

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Dimelo Flow Talks Career Beginnings, Working With Sech, Daddy Yankee and Representing Panamá at The Global Music Stage

Latidomusic

Dimelo Flow Talks Career Beginnings, Working With Sech, Daddy Yankee and Representing Panamá at The Global Music Stage

Welcome to Spotlight, where we do a deep dive in the careers of artists, producers, songwriters and more people making an impact in the Latin music industry.

Dimelo Flow, the Panamanian producer behind hits like “Relación Remix” and “Otro Trago“, talked to us about how he started off as a basketball prospect turned club DJ, and how his love for music led him to become a producer. Now he’s not only working with the biggest names in Reggaeton like Daddy Yankee, J Balvin, and Bad Bunny, but has his sights on making global records and putting Panamá on the map.

Watch the full interview below:

During our Spotlight interview, Dimelo also talked to us about his creative process, knowing exactly how to craft the perfect remix and where to locate each artist to create the perfect synergy on a track.

Dimelo also touched on reinventing his sound and collaborating with fellow Panamian artist Sech for his upcoming album ‘42.’

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The Avengers project cemented Dimelo Flow, Sech, Dalex, Justin Quiles, Feid and Lenny Tavarez as a force in reggaeton and took their careers to new heights. Dimelo said that they are already working on a follow-up to The Academy.

He talked to us about sliding into Tyga’s DM’s and now he wants to produce for mainstream artists, naming his dream collabs to work with Post Malone, Drake, and Travis Scott.

READ: Run Away From That Toxic Relationship with Dalex’s New Single “Feeling”

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Run Away From That Toxic Relationship with Dalex’s New Single “Feeling”

Latidomusic

Run Away From That Toxic Relationship with Dalex’s New Single “Feeling”

Puerto Rican singer Dalex is back to his Latin R&B roots with “Feeling“, which is about leaving behind that relationship that made you question everything, including changing who you are to please the other person.

Produced by Dimelo Flow, “Feeling” not only does it get deep about leaving behind what no longer serves you, but it is also packed with punchlines like “Te olvide como El Chavo, sin querer queriendo“.

In our interview for Latido Music by mitú, Dalex talked to us about the feeling he wanted to convey with the song, singing about heartbreak instead of his usual songs that tend to be more intimate.

Watch out interview below:

In “Feeling,” Dalex wants to explore other sounds and try doing a more commercial record that more people can relate to.

The colorful music video was shot in Miami, directed by Adrián Arredondo for Wildhouse Pictures. Dalex and his love interest are seen riding around dirt bikes, which we later found out in the interview was one of his Top 5 Feelings.

Watch the music video below:

Dalex has a busy 2021 ahead, and “Feeling” is the first single from his upcoming album due this year. The Rich Music singer told us that he has a collab with Reggaetón heavy hitters Wisin & Yandel and Zion & Lennox on the way, as well as an American singer which for now he can’t reveal, but we can’t wait to find out.

Click here to watch Latido Music, our 24/7 Latin music channel.

READ: Bolero Meets R&B in New Girl Ultra Single and Music Video for “Rosas”

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