#mitúVOICE

25 Years After Selena’s Death: This Is What Los Dinos Have Been Up To

We all know that Selena wasn’t a solo act. She was backed up by a badass band we know as Los Dinos. Although the band continued playing after her death, they never really recovered from the tragic loss (same) and disbanded in 2002. Since then, the members have gone their own way. Here’s what Los Dinos have been up to lately…

Los Dinos

CREDIT: @SUZETTESYLD / INSTAGRAM

This is what Selena y Los Dinos looked like… and we remember them like it was just yesterday ?.

Mr. and Mrs. Quintanilla

CREDIT: @SUZETTESYLD / INSTAGRAM

After Selena’s death, Abraham Quintanilla Jr., who started and then managed Selena y Los Dinos, has been dedicated to protecting his daughter’s legacy. He’s been involved in anything that has Selena’s name, including documentaries, albums, movies, fashion lines – even the Selena museum. He and his wife, Marcella, also founded The Selena Foundation, which helps kids in crisis.

A.B. Quintanilla – Bass

CREDIT: @selenareinadeltexmex/ INSTAGRAM

Don’t act like you don’t remember the song “Chiquilla” and yelling out “Te quiero!” Well, two years after his sister’s death, A.B. Quintanilla resurfaced with his own group, Kumbia Kings, a blend of cumbia, pop and R&B. After drama with his bandmate, Cruz Martinez, A.B. left the group and launched Kumbia All Starz in 2006.

Suzette Quintanilla – Drums

What Los Dinos Have Been Up
CREDIT: @SUZETTESYLD / INSTAGRAM

Suzette Quintanilla halted her music career after her sister’s death in 1995. Now she’s the manager of Selena’s museum in Corpus Christi, Texas, and the family’s music production company, Q-Productions. They sign groups that play Tejano music, similar to Los Dinos.

Chris Perez – Guitars

What Los Dinos Have Been Up
CREDIT: @CHRISPEREZ1 / INSTAGRAM

Chris Perez, Selena’s widower, formed his own music group, The Chris Perez Band, in 1998. That year, he married Vanessa Villanueva and later had two children. Although his band was rather successful, they disbanded in 2002. After his divorce from Vanessa, he formed another band in 2010 called the Chris Perez Project, but with little success. In 2012, he wrote the book “To Selena, With Love” without the permission of the Quintanilla family(!), which included personal photos and love letters between the two. Don’t worry, the family later approved the book’s publication.

Pete Astudillo – Backup Vocals

What Los Dinos Have Been Up
CREDIT: @pete_astudillo / Instagram

Pete Astudillo, who co-wrote some of Selena’s most popular songs like “Bidi Bidi Bom Bom,” and rocked that iconic mullet, went on to have a lot of success. He released five albums on his own, the last one in 1999. Aside from participating in Selena’s 2005 tribute concert, he has not released any other music.

Ricky Vela – Keyboards / Songwriter

What Los Dinos Have Been Up
CREDIT: @STILLDREAMINGOFYOU / INSTAGRAM

Ricky Vela (right of Suzette) was also co-brains behind a lot of Selena’s most popular songs, like “La Llamada,” “Fotos y Recuerdos,” and “El Chico Del Apartamento 512.” He continued writing music after Selena died, but slowed down after 1999.

Joe Ojeda – Keyboards

What Los Dinos Have Been Up
Credit: @souls5cinco / Instagram

Joe Ojeda continued composing music after Selena’s death. He wrote songs for Veronica Castro, Jennifer y Los Jetz, Pete Astudillo and Chris Perez. He, too, slowed down around 2010. 

READ: Fashion Crimes That Are Totally Okay IF You’re In Selena’s Band

Don’t forget to share this story with your friends by clicking the button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Lawmakers Want To Include ‘Selena’ In The National Film Registry

Entertainment

Lawmakers Want To Include ‘Selena’ In The National Film Registry

RICCO TORRES/AFP via Getty Images

“Selena” is one of the most influential and impactful movies of our generation. We all remember watching Jennifer Lopez embody the Tejana queen of music. The 1997 biopic is a classic and there is finally talk of including it in the National Film Registry.

“Selena” is one of the most impactful movies of our childhoods.

The 1997 movie was something that we watched over and over when we were younger. We sang the songs and basically learned all of the lines of this movie. It is arguably one of the first times we saw our culture and one of our icons’ stories told for the masses.

The Congressional Hispanic Caucus is pushing for “Selena” to officially be recognized.

Movies are a crucial part of telling the full story of American life. The National Film Registry is a list of movies that are honored for their cultural impact. “Real Women Have Curves,” “West Side Story,” and “Zoot Suit” are all part of the National Film Registry. Rep. Joaquin Castro, D-Texas, is the chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus and wrote a letter asking for the consideration of “Selena.”

“As a next step, we also wish to formally nominate the 1997 film ‘Selena’ for inclusion in the National Film Registry in 2021,” reads the letter. “Directed by Gregory Nava and starring Jennifer Lopez and Edward James Olmos, the film depicts the life, remarkable rise, and tragic death of Tejana music star Selena Quintanilla.”

There is a lot of hope that the Library of Congress will make this happen.

Selena represents that first major and successful jumps from the Latino market to the mainstream that many of us can remember. We finally had someone who looked like us and understood our cultural struggles in a real way. Our story was being told and the film about the music icon was so important in guiding some of us through our own cultural struggles.

“The film also touches on important themes of cultural identity and assimilation faced by Mexican American communities as they navigate their personal connections to two cultures and languages,” the letter continues to explain. “The film has become a beloved icon of Latino culture and has found widespread mainstream success, proving once and for all that Latino stories are American stories.”

Selena is the kind of cultural phenomenon that comes once in a lifetime.

The singer was able to build an impressive legacy that has endured for longer than she was alive. We were raised with her music and told her story over and over to keep us all tuned in to the fact that we could do anything. If Selena could break into the mainstream audience, we could all be that successful.

“Given its importance as a work of Latino cinema, we believe it is deserving of preservation at the Library of Congress. We trust you will give ‘Selena’ careful consideration, and hope to see it included in the titles added to the National Film Registry in 2021,” Rep. Castro further explains in the letter. “We also expect to identify other films which feature the American Latino experience and urge you to devote careful consideration to Latino films when considering films for the registry as well.”

Here’s hoping that “Selena” gets the official recognition it clearly deserves.

We all have our fingers crossed that this movie will earn its place in the National Film Registry because it deserves that kind of praise.

READ: Part 2 Of “Selena: The Series” Has Already Finished Filming And Here’s Everything We Know About The Next Season

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Netflix’s ‘Selena: The Series’ Leads To Massive Increase In Spotify Streams Of La Reina’s Music

Entertainment

Netflix’s ‘Selena: The Series’ Leads To Massive Increase In Spotify Streams Of La Reina’s Music

Michael Tran / FilmMagic

Selena has been dead longer than she was alive, yet her legendary status is only strengthening. La Reina de Tejano Music continues to reign supreme and the latest Spotify Wrapped proves it. Streams of Selena’s music skyrocketed this year and we love to see it.

Selena’s music continues to spread around the world in 2020.

Selena’s music is timeless. Her heartfelt music, in English and Spanish, has transcended culture and race to speak to people around the world. Twenty-five years after her death, Selena fans are still going strong and passing that legacy down to the younger generations. The new Netflix series has reignited that love of Selena to incredibly high proportions.

Streams of Selena’s music on Spotify increased 260 percent.

That’s not a typo. People streamed Selena’s song 260 percent more than the month before because of the timelessness of this singing queen. The spike in Selena streams come after “Selena: The Series” was released on Netflix. The family-approved tv show received a lot of backlash from Selena fans because of the wigs and storyline. However, the show did bring music lovers back to her.

Fans are proud to have helped Selena break this record.

According to Spotify, three songs were the most loved by Selena fans. Two of the songs had the biggest growth in listeners. Those two songs are “Como La Flor” and “Amor Prohibido,” which saw 250 percent and 150 percent increases, respectively. “El Chico del Apartamento 512” joined in to be the three Selena songs to break into the top 200 Spotify songs.

Once again, Selena proves that she is more than a queen of Tex-Mex, she is a queen of music.

The lasting legacy of Selena is something we are still talking about because it still matters. She has remained relevant decades after her death and that is not an easy feat. As 2020 comes to a close, it is impressive to know that Selena is still going strong.

READ: As The New Selena Series Comes Under Scrutiny, People Are Asking Where Is Selena’s Husband Chris Pérez Now?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com