The Latino Vote Is Important, So It’s Key To Stay Informed

Presented By TJCEP

Still not convinced on why you should vote? Let’s see if this can convince you. We’ll wait for you to read it.

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Good! Now that we’re on the same page, you might be thinking, “yeah, but voting is sooo hard.” We hear you, but it doesn’t have to be. Keep reading and we’ll give you an easy breakdown on how to vote.

1. Registration.

If you’re 18 or older and a US citizen, make sure you’re registered to vote. This link will help  you find your state’s database, and while you’re double-checking your registration status, don’t forget to confirm that your address is correct.

Not registered? We have your back! Depending on your state’s rules, you may be able to register to vote by visiting this site. If you live in North Dakota, skip this step; your state doesn’t require you to register prior to voting!

2. Election Dates.

Now that you’re all signed up, it’s important to know ALL election dates, not just the presidential. You guessed it, we have a link for that too! Happy researching. PRO TIP: Add them to your calendar so you won’t forget!

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3. Decide on a candidate.

*Drumroll please* It’s actually not as difficult as you think. Skip the binge-watching sesh and do a bit of research on each candidate. It doesn’t take long, and can have a HUGE impact. For example, we get to elect District Attorneys who have a crazy amount of power, like deciding if a person who commits a petty crime—like having a joint on them—gets sent to prison for a year. Insane, right? And if you’re not sure what role a District Attorney plays, don’t worry, you can learn more about them here.

There are plenty of resources that can help you pick a candidate. Make sure to check them out, but a quick guide is to remember your ABC’s:

Always watch their debates

Be sure to learn their views (you can usually find them on their website).

Candidate’s voting history is public. Make sure to see how they’ve voted in the past.

Researching and carefully choosing a candidate is an important step—don’t skip it, voting blindly can be dangerous!

4. Voting.

It’s easy! Depending on your state laws, there are three ways to vote:

  • Early voting. Not all states offer early voting, but most do. Here’s the early voting calendar per state.
  • Vote by mail. In some cases you never even have to leave your house to vote!!!
  • Vote in person. If you plan on voting in person make sure you know your state’s voter requirements. In some states you need to present an I.D. before voting. Here’s a link that may help.

Still have questions? This website gives you a breakdown of early voting, mail voting, and more.

5. Find your polling place and VOTE!

If you’ve made it this far, you’re close to the finish line, don’t give up now! You can find your polling place here, and cast your vote on election dates.

Voting doesn’t have to be complicated at all. So, don’t feel overwhelmedyou got this! And if you’re still thinking, “who cares if I vote?” Well, trust us, there are some people out there who actually do care, but not for the reasons you might expect. There are some elected officials that go through great lengths to prevent you from voting. For example, making fake fliers or automated phone calls targeting specific communities–and by specific, we mean black and brown–warning them about bogus arrest warrants related to unpaid parking tickets and outstanding fines. You see, diversity in voting might prevent them from being re-elected. So, don’t let them fool you! Voting is easy. If you can figure out how to use the self-check out at the store, you can figure out how to vote. Don’t be intimidated! ¡Sí se puede!

SOURCES:
https://www.usa.gov/how-to-vote
https://www.usa.gov/register-to-vote
https://www.eac.gov/assets/1/1/A%20Voter’s%20Guide%20to%20Federal%20Elections.pdf
https://www.eac.gov/assets/1/6/VotersGuide_508.pdf
https://vote.gov/
https://www.vote.org/early-voting-calendar/
http://www.nass.org/can-i-vote
http://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/absentee-and-early-voting.aspx#state
http://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/voter-id.aspx#Laws%20in%20Effect

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