Entertainment

Texas Doesn’t Want You Messin’ With The Chilean Flag

It might seem odd that the Chilean flag emoji (??) would find itself the target of a political debate in Texas, of all places, but that’s exactly what happened. Texas doesn’t have an emoji for its own state flag, leading many people to use the visibly similar Chilean flag when sending messages about Texas. For Texans, this improper use of the emoji (??) has been a source of irritation for quite a while. Now, a Texas lawmaker has filed a resolution asking fellow Texans to stop using the Chilean flag emoji as a Texas flag.

Texans aren’t afraid to voice their anger over the Chilean flag ?? emoji usage.


The flags are very similar, but that hasn’t stopped people from using the emoji incorrectly.


Yikes.

So here’s what the ?? Chilean flag looks like.

Screen Shot 2017-02-20 at 11.01.13 AM
Oscar Maltez/FLICKR

For Chile, the white represents the snow on the Andes mountains, and the red represents the blood spilled fighting for freedom. The blue represents the sky and the star is a “guide to progress and honor.”

And here’s a Texas flag in the wild.

Screen Shot 2017-02-20 at 11.02.12 AM

Kimberly Vardeman / Flickr

For the Texas flag, red represents bravery, white represents purity, and blue represents loyalty. The star represents unity.

The two flags share a very similar design, leading to confusion among emoji users.

FLAGS
Kimberly Vardeman / Oscar Maltez / FLICKR

????? vs. ?????

To combat this problem, Texas State Representative Tom Oliverson recently introduced his resolution asking Texans to stop using Chile’s flag emoji.


In the resolution, Oliverson urges “Texans not to use the flag emoji of the Republic of Chile when referring to the Texas flag.” Oliverson told Reuters, “I designed [the resolution] to be educational, kind of like a public service announcement.”

The resolution, which is not a law, makes several distinctions between the flags of Texas and Chile.


Rep. Oliverson’s resolution states that while both flags represent proud cultures with rich heritages, one major distinction remains.

Though they are similar, the resolution states that Chile’s flag does not “compare” to the flag of Texas.


The language in the resolution states:

That the 85th Legislature of the State of Texas hereby reject the notion that the Chilean flag, although it is a nice flag, can in any way compare to or be substituted for the official state flag of Texas and urge all Texans not to use the Republic of Chile flag emoji in digital forums when referring to the Lone Star Flag of the great State of Texas.

Of course some people clapped back, saying the real problem is poor education.


So after reading all this, one question remains: whose flag is this?


No cheating.



Quiz: Can You Tell Which Celebrity Picture Is From the 1900’s And Which One Is From 2016?

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Showtime’s ‘Bad Hombres’ Is A Documentary Highlighting The World’s Only Binational Baseball Team

Entertainment

Showtime’s ‘Bad Hombres’ Is A Documentary Highlighting The World’s Only Binational Baseball Team

tecolotes_2_laredos / Instagram

Sports have a way of bringing people together. The experience of rooting for your team is a unifying feeling that transcends borders and culture. Showtime is exploring the importance of sports through the lens of the Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos.

“Bad Hombres” is a documentary highlighting immigration under President Trump through baseball.

Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos are the only binational professional baseball team in the world. The team splits their home games between stadiums in Laredo, Texas and Nuevo Laredo, Mexico. Director Andrew Glazer wanted to highlight the immigration issue through a sports lens to offer a different layer to the narrative.

“Most of the people trying to come into the U.S. are families and children trying to escape horrible violence in Central America,” Glazer told CBS Local’s DJ Sixsmith. “That story has been told, so what I wanted to do was show people in a way that I thought would be relatable to what life is like on the border. What life is like on those two sides and how interconnected they are. The thing that struck me to be honest is that initially in Laredo, Texas was how pervasive Spanish is spoken.”

The documentary shows the struggles of the baseball team trying to make sense of the volatile U.S.-Mexico border relations.

The Tecolotes de los Dos Laredos split time playing their home games between two stadiums in the U.S. and Mexico. The Trump administration’s constant battle with Mexico and threats to close the border put the team’s season in jeopardy. A first look teaser shows team managers trying to coordinate the release of game tickets in time with the ever-changing immigration announcements from the Trump administration.

“Bad Hombres” speaks politics without directly addressing politics.

“Even though my film has an overarching political message, the players are not covertly or overtly political in any way,” Glazer told CBS Local’s DJ Sixsmith. “They are baseball players and they are living their lives and a lot of them are trying to make it to the majors and some of them were in the majors and are now finishing their careers. There wasn’t a whole lot of political discussions.”

Glazer made sure to highlight the depths and complexities of the team members dealing with the political climate without politics.

“Inherently, what made the team fascinating is you had players from the U.S. who were Anglo-American players and Mexican American players who had a different perspective,” Glazer told DJ Sixsmith. “Then you had Mexican players and some Dominican players and Cuban and people from everywhere else. There were different languages and different perspectives. Seeing how that developed over time was pretty fascinating.”

“Bad Hombres” is streaming on Showtime.

READ: Veronica Alvarez Is The Coach For The Oakland A’s And Her Presence Is Giving Girls A Chance To Pursue Baseball

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A Chilean Police Officer Is Charged With Attempted Murder After Throwing a Protestor Off Of a Bridge

Things That Matter

A Chilean Police Officer Is Charged With Attempted Murder After Throwing a Protestor Off Of a Bridge

Photo by Marcelo Hernandez/Getty Images

Earlier this month, a police officer in Santiago, Chile was captured on video pushing a 16-year-old male demonstrator off of a bridge. The boy fell into the canal below, fracturing his wrist and suffering head trauma. He was transported to the hospital and is in stable condition.

The violent video sparked an additional wave of protests against the Carabineros–Chile’s militarized national police force that the officer was a part of.

Before the video surfaced, witnesses who were protesting voiced their anger at the police officer’s actions and demanded that he be brought to justice. Initially, a spokesperson for the Carabineros, General Enrique Monrás, denied any wrongdoing on the part of the officer, claiming that the boy “lost balance and fell”.

Monrás claimed the police force even had footage that refuted the purported events. But when the footage of the boy being pushed over the bridge went public, there was no question as to what happened.

The footage of the incident went viral in Chile, prompting a surge of demonstrations and protests in Santiago–a city already racked with civil unrest.

CLAUDIO REYES/AFP via Getty Images)

Days later, Chile opened up an investigation against the police officer, saying the officer “gave false information to the Prosecutor’s Office” and had “abandoned the victim” after throwing him off the bridge. The officer’s lawyer says he was following procedure. Nevertheless, by then the damage had been done.

Following the incident, protestors threw red die into the canal, making it look like it was running red with the metaphorical blood of protestors. The protests are part of an ongoing civil unrest that was sparked by economic inequality in Chile as well as President Sebastián Piñera’s failure to address the people’s concerns.

To make matters worse, the Piñera government has responded to the protests with excessive violence.

In the last year, Chile has been making headlines for permanently blinding protestors with rubber bullets. Protestors claim that Caballeros are deliberately shooting people in the eyes, aiming to blind them for life.

This most recent incident has simply served to bolster the protestors’ claims that they are being treated brutally by the Chilean government. “The police are violent. We can’t bear it anymore,” said a protestor named Carmen Soria to Al Jazeera News. “They’ve raped, tortured, run people over, blinded others, and now, they’re throwing people in the Mapocho river. The government doesn’t want us to protest, doesn’t want us to gather together, but they don’t care that we gather in the busses and in subways like sardines to go to work.”

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