things that matter

Here’s What It’s Like To Be A Black Migrant In Mexico

Ebony Bailey / Vimeo

This filmmaker investigated what it is like to be African in Mexico.


Filmmaker Ebony Bailey’s documentary film “Life Between Borders: Black Migrants in Mexico” is a glimpse into the lives of black African and Caribbean migrants in Mexico. The film dives into the situation at the U.S.-Mexico border, where many Haitian migrants are “stuck” in Mexico following an order by former President Barack Obama. After the earthquake that devastated Haiti in 2010, many Haitians left the country to find work in countries such as Brazil. When the U.S. suspended deportations of Haitian nationals and granted them humanitarian visas to enter the country following the 2010 earthquake, many Haitians began traveling through Mexico to enter the U.S. But the order was eventually reversed, leaving thousands of Haitians who were traveling from Brazil to the U.S., effectively stranded in Mexico.


Bailey’s film also explores the relationship between Mexicans and migrants of African descent. Seynabou, the child of a Mexican national and an African immigrant, discusses facing discrimination from teachers, professors and law enforcement. Seynabou also talks about creating Cocina Baobab, a cultural organization that serves dishes from the African Diaspora to show the influences of African food on Mexican cuisine.


“I would tell all black people arriving in Mexico not to give up hope,” Seynabou told Bailey. “The literal problem that exists is that we are black because European immigration does not bring discomfort. It is welcome. White migration is always welcome. It’s not a problem. Black migration will always be one. So, don’t lose hope; don’t put your head down. Work hard. In the end, money is the consequence of work and well-being is the consequence of work.”


(H/T: Remezcla)

READ: These Peruvians Are Embracing Their Afro-Latino Pride Like Never Before

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They Couldn't Find A Job Because Of Discrimination, So They Did The Next Best Thing

things that matter

They Couldn’t Find A Job Because Of Discrimination, So They Did The Next Best Thing

Los Perejiles / Facebook

Located in Buenos Aires, Argentina, Los Perejiles is pizza catering service that offers way more than a few pies or delicious, warm pastries, the Guardian reports. The fast-rising company offers jobs to young men and women with Down Syndrome who are often discriminated by potential employers. Tired of being overlooked, a group of four young men with Down Syndrome decided to do something about it.

In 2015, this group of four young men decided that if no one would hire them, they would just create their own business.

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Los Perejiles Eventos / Facebook

With a desire to work, and only discrimination holding them back, Franco, Leandro, Mateo, and Mauricio (pictured left to right) became entrepreneurs, opening their own restaurant, Los Perejiles.

With each founding member capitalizing on their own talents in the kitchen, the industrious group found a real recipe for success.

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Los Perejiles Eventos / Facebook

By 2016, Los Perejiles was catering a few small affairs around Buenos Aires.

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Los Perejiles Eventos/Facebook

The four chefs began catering events in schools, private gathers, and buisness events, La Nacion reports.

Word of mouth spread, and the demand for Los Perejiles catering ramped up.

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Los Perejiles Eventos/Facebook

Los Perejiles keeps a Facebook photo album for every event they’ve worked. Each album shows how the gatherings have increased over time. Since 2016, the company has amassed a following over more than 35,000 Facebook fans.

And Los Perejiles had to expand its own staff to meet the demand.

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Los Perejiles Eventos/Facebook

These days, the small crew has a main office in Buenos Aires’ Plaza de Mayo, and caters around the city as well as in the North, La Nacion reports. When they aren’t busy with events, the group hands out food to the homeless population in Buenos Aires.

For co-founder Leandro Lopez, success means that Los Perejiles can hire people who may not otherwise get a job.

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Los Perejiles Eventos / Facebook

Lopez told ACI Prensa that he wanted to show that it was normal for people with Down Syndrome to be part of the workforce: “The idea was to change the paradigm around Down Syndrome.”

To date, Los Perejiles has catered over 128 events, and it employs 24 men and women with Down Syndrome.

Producción en vivo

Posted by Los Perejiles Eventos on Tuesday, November 1, 2016

Los Pereiles Eventos / Facebook 

Lopez told ACIPrensa, “It seems to me that we all have the right to two fundamental things, to life and to be taken into account. These two premises can make a happy living person his whole life.”

READ: This Three-Year-Old Latino Skateboarder Takes Slams And Gets Buck In This Vid