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Drought in Mexico Exposes a 16th Century Church

Notre Dame Cathedral went up in flames Monday morning, spurning a mass of concern and conversation around the 13-century  church’s role in our global history and the French culture. By Monday afternoon, the cathedral’s spire had fallen, flames had spread to a rectangular tower and the roof had begun to collapse. Many fear that firefighters may not be able to save the cathedral.

The tragic event is a reminder of a cathedral-sized event that happened just a few years ago. Years ago a drought was so bad that or the second time since 2002, water levels dropped so much that the ruins of a 16th century church in Chiapas, Mexico have been revealed once again. It’s just so damn beautiful, it’s hard to be mad about it though.

The church first started appearing in mid-August.

Credit: @VisitChiapasApp / Twitter

Within weeks, we got to see more that was first submerged in 1966.

But the church had been abandoned long before because of the plague.

This is the second time in two decades that the reservoir waters have fallen far enough to expose the church.

And it’s on track to be just as bad as the last time the reservoir dried out.

The reemergence of the church is calling attention to the drought affecting Mexico.

Most people would prefer more rains over more church, obvi.

Local fishermen are taking advantage of the situation and creating mini tours to explore the ruins.

And businesses are using the event as a marketing tool.

We get it, it’s cool.

But it would be better to “see” the church under water again.

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