Entertainment

Daddy Yankee’s New Zumba Song ‘Hula Hoop’ Is Definitely Not For Children

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If you’ve been trying to find a way to combine your two favorite things (getting fit and breaking it all the way down), peep this banger from the Puerto Rican reggaetón superstar, Mr. Gasolina himself, Daddy Yankee! According to Billboard, Daddy Yankee has partnered with Zumba to create the song “Hula Hoop” for use in their classes.

The bass-heavy reggaetón track has a lyric video featuring flashing neon hula hoops and classic Zumba moves .

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It’s got everything you’d expect from a Daddy Yankee Zumba video: hip shaking, hand-punching, lasers and a packed VIP section. What else do you need to work out and feel like you’re getting your life together? Yasss!

The video even shows you how to do the exercise on beat with a dancing cursor.

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Rómpele! Rómpele! Rómpele! I know, it sounds a little repetitive, but believe me, you’ll feel the burn in no time.

It’s really a workout video in a sultry disguise. If you follow along, you’ll have a sick core in just a few short weeks.

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Anyone out there breaking a sweat yet? One and two. Come on now. Three and four. You can do it!

Check the full video below and see if you can learn the lyrics and do the moves.

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READ: When You’re In The Mood For Perreo, This Latina Has You Covered

Is combining Zumba and reggaetón the perfect way to get people to exercise? Tag a friend who would totally work out with you to this song below! 

J Balvin Has Made History Out Of Lollapalooza And Becomes The First Latino Headliner In The Festival’s 28 Years

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J Balvin Has Made History Out Of Lollapalooza And Becomes The First Latino Headliner In The Festival’s 28 Years

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I don’t care how tired you are, what language you speak, where you have to go next, if the DJ decides to pop on some reggaeton at the club, your plans just changed. The genre has been hitting big with U.S. audiences, especially with pop superstars like Cardi B giving it a wider audience to enjoy those thumping bass lines. It’s the perfect music to roll your hips and run your fingers through your hair to while you work off that double shot you took earlier. Some might say it’s also the perfect music to play at the carne asada or to clean the house or to write an essay or…

If you need an introduction to the genre, look no further than J Balvin.

His songs continually perform well in Latin Music charts and his videos are known to grab millions of views within hours of posting. Whether he’s singing about not remembering what happened last night in “6 AM” or the joys of dirty dancing in “Ginza”, or writing a love song to all of us in “Mi Gente“, the smooth sound of his voice mixed with the beat and latin rhythms hits a certain pleasure center in the brain that is absolutely infectious.

Also, I think we would make really beautiful babies. Just sayin…

Over the weekend, J Balvin became the first Latinx headliner at Lallapalooza, a festival that has been in existence for 28 years.

Yep. I said first. Because in the Year of Our Lord Two Thousand and Nineteen, Latinos still have firsts to break through.

And the fans were here for it.

Across social media and in reviews from Rolling Stones to Billboard, many are saying that this was the most intense headline event ever. Way to represent J Balvin!

Seriously, y’all, the show was lit.

I mean…absolutely hyped up.

J Balvin also brought out Wisin y Yandel.

LOST THEIR MINDS.

Lollapalooza, as a festival, started in 1991 as a project of Perry Farrell, the frontman of a popular 90s alt rock band Jane’s Addiction.

The festival was mostly known for its alternative rock and grunge offerings that were indicative of the times. Bands like Red Hot Chili Peppers, Soundgarden, and Nine Inch Nails would travel the country with the festival. While rock music was the main focus, the lineups were eclectic and featured rap acts like Cypress Hill, Ice Cube, and A Tribe Called Quest as well as  electronic music and, yes, Latinx music. Mexican rock band, Café Tacvba were the first to play the festival in 1992. 

Since then, Latinx acts have been part of the North American Lollapalozza festival lineup, which is now rooted in Chicago, but not a huge part. What makes the fact that J Balvin is the first Latinx headliner even more baffling is that the first satellite Lollapalooza festival was in Chile starting in 2011. The next two were in Brazil and Argentina. You would think the North American branch would play nicer with its sister cities.

American audiences have been slow to come around to Latinx entertainment though. Probably the first representation we had in the mainstream consciousness was Desi Arnaz in I Love Lucy. It’s the first example I can think of where a large chunk of the American population loved a Latinx singer whether she was singing in English or Spanish. Since then, Latinx acts have typically had to develop English albums to make an impact in the U.S. market – Gloria Estefan, Selena, and Ricky Martin come to mind.

So when bands like Los Tucanes de Tijuana find themselves on a major summer fest lineup and then are given the key to the city, it’s kind of a big deal. It means that promoters are taking Latinos seriously as a demographic to market to. It also means promoters are ready to support the entertainers Latinos love with real money. 

It’s apparent that J Balvin understands the importance of this legacy.

In this instagram post he says, “”This is dedicated to dreamers to Latinos and those who know that in life everything is cause and effect, and that we deserve to be here.” 

J Balvin deserves to be here and we can only hope it’s the start of the beginning for more Latinx artists to break through.

Someone On Twitter Claims To Have Figured Out Who Bad Bunny’s Muse Is And We Are Here For It

Entertainment

Someone On Twitter Claims To Have Figured Out Who Bad Bunny’s Muse Is And We Are Here For It

Bad Bunny is as melodramatic as he is a hitmaker. The emo Latin trap king is always rapping or singing about a love interest, whether expressing heartbreak (“Amorfoda”), blaming his ex for the split (“Soy Peor”), declaring he’s better off without her (“Solo de Mí”), reminiscing on their past (“La Canción”), realizing he hasn’t quite moved on (“Triste”), acknowledging she was right all along (“Otra Noche en Miami”), imagining the life they could have had together (“Si Estuviésemos Juntos”), asking her to return (“Vuelve”) or reminding her that she’ll always be his (“Mia”).

Someone clearly broke El Conejo Malo’s heart — and a Twitter fan thinks he’s uncracked who the perp could be.

In a lengthy thread on Twitter, user and major Benito stan @vicentetrujillo8, also known as “god bunny,” made a convincing case on how Bad Bunny’s ex-girlfriend Carliz is the famed artist’s muse behind his biggest hits.

Credit: @vicentetrujilo8 / Twitter

“Este hilo es con fin de entrener y para hablar sobre una persona que ha sido fuente de inspiración para las letras de Benito, y como él la sigue recordando en sus canciones,” the Mexico-based enthusiast begins the thread, also posting an old photo of the former couple.

According to the fan, Benito and Carliz were high school sweethearts who dated from 2011 to 2017.

The pair allegedly worked at the Econo supermarket together in Vega Baja before his career took off in 2016. The following year, the couple, according to Vicente, had planned to wed. Instead, they split up. Since then, the sad boy pisces has made numerous songs about an ex, many that the Benito devotee believes were directed at Carliz.

In “Otra Noche en Miami,” Bad Bunny raps, “Pero son las 11:34 y de ti me acordé” y “En el garaje esta el Bentley que tanto querías.” In Vicente’s posts, he highlights two tweets from Carliz, one from February 14, 2018, Valentine’s Day, when she wrote simply “11:34” and another where she joked “voy a tener que empezar a cobra regalías.” 

In a later Instagram live, she also notes that her dream car is a Bentley.

There’s no solid proof that those Benito verses were directed to Carliz, but it does seem hella likely.

Vicente, however, digs deeper into El Conejo Malo’s lyrics for further evidence.

In “Si Estuviésemos Juntos,” an aged Bunny imagines a wedding with a woman that never took place, much like his planned nuptials with Carliz. Even more, the woman booked to be Benito’s bride in the video heavily resembles his ex, with bangs just as she used to have when they were dating.

In current songs like “No Me Conoce” Remix and “Callaíta,” Vicente is convinced he’s talking about Carliz.

Benito bigs up women who are both smart and sexy, he could once more be referring to women like Carliz, a student at the University of Puerto Rico School of Law who often takes videos of herself with friends singing and dancing along to reggaeton and Latin trap hits, oftentimes many of Bad Bunny’s own jams.

“Por lo que muestra en sus redes, podemos deducir que Carliz es una chica buena y estudiosa, pero que disfruta su vida junto a sus amigas. Una que otra vez, la hemos visto en sus historias de Instagram, bailar las canciones de Benito como Mía, Callaíta, No Me Conoce, etc,” Vicente writes.

While the fan makes a strong case about Carliz being the muse behind many of Bad Bunny’s songs, Bad Bunny has us thinking otherwise.

Credit: Chente Ydrach / YouTube

In an interview with Puerto Rican comedian Chente Ydrach, Benito noted that his songs were directed to different women and were even sometimes an imagining of what some of the ladies he has dated would say or feel about him.

In the interview, which was published on the funny guy’s vlog on December 24, the day Benito dropped his surprise debut album, Chente asks bluntly, “who are you talking about?”

“I’ve been a lover since I was a boy, since I was little. In the first grade, I’d bring a Valentine’s Day gift to school, and I would give it to the prettiest girl I saw that day. So since I was a kid, I’ve been a lover, and when I fall, I really love them and suffer and cry and think, ‘damn, I really love her.’ I’m of that flow,” he said, suggesting that he has had many heartbreaks and thus writes about each of them.

He goes on to say that the sad songs on X100PRE, as well as the ones that came before the album, are about different women from different times of life because he has gotten his heart broken on multiple occasions.

But he also adds that some of the songs are imaginings of what the women whose hearts he shattered would say about him.

“When I sing ‘Amorfoda’ in my concerts, I always say that I’ve fallen in love a thousand times, I’ve had my heart broken a thousand times and I’ve also broken a thousand hearts. So there are also songs that I sing as if the person who I fucked up with is singing it to me. ‘Soy Peor’ doesn’t signify that I’m worse; it signifies that she’s worse because of me,” he shares.

With Benito’s relationship with Carliz being his longest, and possibly the most meaningful, it’s likely that Vicente is right about many of El Conejo Malo’s songs referencing this specific ex. However, as a self-described lover and heartbreaker, Bunny himself admits that his tracks are inspired by several past and current romances, and the only one who could identify which emo bop is for which lover is, well, Benito.

Read: 7 Crucial Lessons On Self-Love, As Taught By Body Positive Trapero Bad Bunny 

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