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You Couldn’t Go to a Family Party Without Hearing All This Sh*t From Mom

Why did she put us through this every time?

¿Ya saludaste?

Credit: xtinagif / Tumblr

Yes. But do you expect me to say hi to all 7797 people here?

Y se saluda de beso.

Credit: Fox / Glee / smanderberrypez / Tumblr

There’s no way I’m kissing my creepy tío.

Ve juega con tus primas… Platícales.

Credit: gottalovebeingafangirl / Tumblr

I literally only like like two of them, so… no.

READ: 14 Types of Primas We All Have

No seas ranchera.

Credit: Giphy

Ugh, you say that every time.

Siéntate a comer con tus primas.

Credit: nbcthevoice / Tumblr

Really? Do we have to go over this again?

Cuidado con hacerme esas caras ?.

Credit: nbcthevoice / Tumblr

I wasn’t even making faces!

Estate donde te pueda ver.

Credit: Netflix / commander-racc00n / Tumblr

Wtf?! Where do you think I’m going to go?

READ: Only a Mexican Stomach Can Survive These Snacks

Dile a tu tía cuánto te gustó la comida.

Credit: cockygomez / Tumblr

Didn’t you teach me not to lie??

Pídele un pedazo de pastel para llevar a la casa.

Credit: yourreactiongifs / Tumblr

So embarrassing!

Ándale ve y baila.

Credit: yourreactiongifs / Tumblr

I think I’ll go talk to my primas now. Dancing quebraditas with my tíos is literally the most awkward thing ever.

No estés chingando que te quieres ir temprano.

Credit: quandotiverqueser / Tumblr

Quit trying to force me to be with my primas!

Di que tienes que hacer tarea para irnos.

Credit: samuelwinschester / Tumblr

More lies.

READ: Here’s a Breakdown of Every Type of Tía Latina That Exists

Dad: Dile a tu mamá que ya nos vamos.

Credit: jenniferlopezfashion / Tumblr

Here we go… ?.

Dile a tu papá que traiga el carro.

Credit: zoeyskravitz / Tumblr

Do I have “messenger” written on my forehead?

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Another Gender Reveal Party Goes Bad As Two Die In Plane Crash

Things That Matter

Another Gender Reveal Party Goes Bad As Two Die In Plane Crash

Although many have highlighted the ethical problems with so-called gender reveal parties, they remain very popular ways to announce the gender of a new baby. But they’ve also frequently turned tragic with several stunts leading to severe injuries and even deaths in the last couple of years.

Now, there’s news out of Cancún that a plane crash related to a gender reveal stunt has left at least two people dead.

A gender reveal party went terribly wrong along a Mexican beach.

Yet another gender reveal party turned tragic as two people died after a plane involved in the stunt in Mexico crashed into the water. The incident occurred Monday afternoon in the Nichupté Lagoon near Cancun, according to Quintana Roo Nautical Associates, a private nautical business association that said it assisted in the rescue mission.

A video of the gender reveal shows the plane flying over the beach and emitting a pink smoke, as people cheer and shout “Nina!”

The camera then pans around and captures the small aircraft as it crashes into the water. One person died during the crash, and a second person died after being rescued, the attorney general’s office in Quintana Roo state confirmed to ABC News Thursday.

The incident is the latest fatal accident, and plane crash, connected with gender reveal parties.

The fatal plane crash is the latest deadly gender reveal stunt. In February, a 28-year-old New York man was building a device for his child’s gender reveal party when it exploded, killing him and injuring his brother. Earlier that month, a baby shower became tragic when a small cannon blew up and killed a Michigan man. In 2019, debris from a gender reveal explosion struck and killed an Iowa woman. And just a year earlier a gender reveal smoke bomb in Tucson, Arizona caused a fire that led to more than $8 million in damages.

Also in 2019, an airplane crashed in Texas after the pilot dumped about 350 gallons of pink water, authorities said. Both passengers survived, one suffering only minor injuries.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission shared a public service announcement on Twitter that urged people to “choose cake” instead of “improvised explosive devices.”

“Don’t turn a party into a family tragedy. Get a cake. Leave fireworks, smoke bombs, or other explosive devices to the professionals,” the Tweet said.

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Woman Who Watched Her Mother Die Before Her Eyes While At Sea As A 9-Year-Old Reunited With Her Rescuers

Fierce

Woman Who Watched Her Mother Die Before Her Eyes While At Sea As A 9-Year-Old Reunited With Her Rescuers

May 20, 1986, started out for Desireé Rodriguez and her family as an idyllic morning.

At the time, Desireé’s father (a 30-year-old construction worker by the name of Thomas Rodriguez) had taken her, her mother, and sister as well an aunt and uncle out to Catalina Island for a day of sailing. The plan was to go out, fish, and bask in the summer sun before heading back home. In the evening, just as they were headed home the family was impacted by a dense fog. Desireé and her 5-year-old sister Trisha awoke from a nap on the boat to calls from her father to abandon ship and within minutes the entire family was lost at sea. Out in the water and away from their boat that had capsized.

 The family of six was stranded in the chilly Pacific water for hours and Desireé watched as her father first went to swim for rescue and never returned. In the hours that slowly stretched by Desireé witnessed the death of her sister, her mother, her uncle and then her aunt.

Decades have passed since her family’s accident but Desireé has lived to tell of the story thanks to the two men who rescued her.

In a recent piece by The New York times, Desireé was reunited with the two men who were remarkably able to save her after she spent a nightmarish 20 hours in the ocean.

Only 9-years-old at the time of the tragic events, Desireé recalls believing that her father would return with help when he first swam away from the boat. “My dad was like the superhero to me. I actually thought he would get help,” Desireé explained before calling the desperate hours that followed. After watching her family members die, she found herself all alone.

“At that point, I just kind of made the decision, I need to get away from this boat,” Desireé recalled to the New York Times. “I need to swim away, somewhere else. … Where? I don’t know.”

Just when Desireé decided to give up hope, the skipper of a commercial sportfishing boat spotted her orange life jacket in the water.

The boat’s first officer leapt into the water and fished Desireé out of the water. Desireé was ultimately transported back to San Pedro and never saw her rescuers again.

“I don’t think I would have lived, I’ll be honest with you. I think at that point, I was just kind of done,” Desireé explained in a recent interview about the incident. According to an article at the time that described the incident, Desireé had suffered no major physical injuries and was “in good spirits.” She left the hospital in San Pedro the next time.

“I had even hoped that my dad did make it somewhere,” Desireé explained of her thinking of the time. “Maybe he is living on an island and just got amnesia and didn’t know that he has a family. You know, you always have hope. But you get older, and reality sets in, and you’re like, OK. He didn’t make it.”

Paul Strasser and Mark Pisano, the two men who rescued her, ultimately earned commemorative plaques for their bravery from Mayor Tom Bradley. Desireé Rodriguez, now Desireé Campuzano, was adopted by another aunt and uncle who raised her. She went onto attend junior college in Fullerton, built herself a career in criminal justice, married and had a son. Still, she always wondered what had happened to the men who saved her.

It wasn’t until the COVID-19 pandemic that Strasser and Pisano came into contact with Philip Friedman who launched a podcast about his hobby as a fisherman.

“Friedman Adventures” which launched this past December, shares incredible stories from fishermen. Ine one episode Pisano spoke about the 1986 rescue.

“It’s kind of a weird story, kind of like there are some supernatural qualities,” Pisano explained of the experience on the podcast.

Friedman felt motivated to unite the two rescuers and Desireé. Ultimately a friend of Desireé’s heard the episode when it aired and made the connection. He reached out to Desireé and then Friedman and ultimately she and her rescuers were reunited.

“I was nervous at first,” Desireé said of meeting Strasser and Pisano “just seeing [the] guys and putting kind of finalization to the ‘what happened.’” The three were finally reunited during another episode of the podcast.

“I feel like she’s sort of our daughter, in a way, because we brought her back to life,” Strasser said during their reunion. “Even though we never knew each other.”

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