Entertainment

Weather Girl Embraces Her Assets On Instagram Over And Over And Over Again

Not even the most precise meteorologist could’ve predicted the storm of criticism Yanet Garcia, the hot weather girl from Monterrey, Mexico, received after posting a video of her out-of-proportion booty on T.V.

This is the video she posted:

Las Noticias FDS ☀️☔️⚡️

A video posted by Yanet Garcia (@iamyanetgarcia) on

CREDIT: @IAMYANETGARCIA / INSTAGRAM

Ya, that angle does things to her booty.

Some fans were outright nasty:

Screen Shot 2016-03-17 at 4.30.31 PM
Credit: @iamyanetgarcia / Instagram

Others didn’t mind at all:

Screen Shot 2016-03-17 at 4.34.29 PM
Credit: @iamyanetgarcia / Instagram

For the haters, she posted a second pic of the segment setting the record straight:

☀️☔️⚡️

A photo posted by Yanet Garcia (@iamyanetgarcia) on

Credit: @Iamyanetgarcia / Instagram

No matter the angle, she looks great.

Since the debacle a week ago, Yanet has continued posting pics flaunting her assets, like this one:

Enfócate en sacar tu mejor versión ??

A photo posted by Yanet Garcia (@iamyanetgarcia) on

Credit: @Iamyanetgarcia / Instagram

And this one:

Hola ??

A photo posted by Yanet Garcia (@iamyanetgarcia) on

Credit: @Iamyanetgarcia / Instagram

And this one:

? @dievko

A photo posted by Yanet Garcia (@iamyanetgarcia) on

Credit: @Iamyanetgarcia / Instagram

And this one:

“ Lo fácil, ya lo hice; lo difícil, lo estoy haciendo y lo imposible, me tardaré, pero lo lograré. ”

A photo posted by Yanet Garcia (@iamyanetgarcia) on

Credit: @Iamyanetgarcia / Instagram

And even this video:

☀️☔️⚡️La magia de la Televisión

A video posted by Yanet Garcia (@iamyanetgarcia) on

Credit: @Iamyanetgarcia / Instagram

You know what they say, if you got it, presúmelo!

[H/T: E! Online]

READ: Yanet Garcia Responds to Those Who Say She Dresses ‘Too Sexy’ for a Weather Reporter

Don’t forget to share this story with your friends by clicking the button below!

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

From Puerto Rico To New York, Hurricane Isaías Has Devastated Millions

Entertainment

From Puerto Rico To New York, Hurricane Isaías Has Devastated Millions

Hurricane Isaías is just one hurricane of an expectedly active season. The storm-battered the Caribbean islands before making its way to the Carolinas and up the east coast. The storm has killed 5 people and we are still at the beginning of hurricane season.

Tropical Storm Isaías slammed into Puerto Rico on July 31.

The storm knocked out power to thousands of Puerto Ricans as the storm approached. Dozens had to be rescued from the area of Mayaguez as flooding devastated the area. José Ortiz, the CEO of the state-run power company resigned after the power outages rocked the island still reeling from hurricanes and earthquakes.

The storm grew to a category 1 hurricane as it battered the Bahamas.

The storm killed at least one person in the Bahamas and weakened to a tropical storm as it hit the island. The storm triggered a series of warning along the Florida coastline from Boca Raton to Brevard county. The storm ravaged parts of the Bahamas with winds up to 80 miles per hour.

Florida was spared much of the storm as it changed course.

Florida, which is already grappling with a terrifyingly out of control Covid outbreak, was spared a direct hit from Hurricane Isaías. The storm turned north and brushed along Florida’s eastern coastline. The storm was headed directly to the Carolinas.

North and South Carolina braced for a direct hit from the storm as it made its way north.

The storm made landfall with 85 mile-per-hour winds in the Carolinas bring heavy winds and flooding. Millions of people lost power as the storm lashed the east coast for two days while making its way up to New York. Flooding was particularly devastating in Pennsylvania as the storm forced millions sin to some form of flood warning.

The storm arrived in New York on August 4 and packed a punch.

Tropical Storm Isaías devastated the tri-state region. Millions are without power in New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut after the storm destroyed homes, power lines, and cars.

Officials for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration are warning the east coast of a more active hurricane season. After Isaías, the season could bring 10 more hurricanes with potentially devastating effects. As the season picks up, it is important to be prepared. Makes sure you have an emergency plan and an emergency kit.

For more information, check out the National Weather Service.

READ: Hurricane Hanna Battered Texas But Did It Actually Knock Over Part Of Trump’s Border Wall?

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com

Tropical Storm Leaves At Least 20 Dead In El Salvador And Now Threatens The U.S. Gulf Coast

Things That Matter

Tropical Storm Leaves At Least 20 Dead In El Salvador And Now Threatens The U.S. Gulf Coast

Salvador Melendez / Getty

The 2020 Hurricane season is off to a very strong start – in fact, it’s a record breaking one. The season officially started on June 1st, however, we’re only on June 3rd and there have already been three named storms. Even before the season got started, officials were warning of an above average season and it seems their predictions are playing out.

Tropical Storm Amanda killed at least 20 people when it struck El Salvador, unleashing flooding and landslides.

After making landfall in El Salvador, Tropical Storm Amanda has been blamed for at least 20 deaths in the country. Officials there say that more than 7,000 people have been taken into shelters as the country attempts to recover from the devastating effects.

Torrential rains and strong winds destroyed hundreds of homes and left highways and roads out of service, stranding many in very dangerous situations.

Carolina Recinos, a senior aide to President Nayib Bukele, said the storm had dumped the equivalent of “almost 10 percent” of the annual rainfall on the country in a relatively short span of time.

Bukele declared a 15-day state of emergency to cope with the effects of Amanda, which he estimated to have caused $200 million in damage.

“We’ve never experienced this,” Maria Torres, whose house was damaged, told the Associated Press news agency. “The rain was so strong and suddenly, the water entered the homes, and we just saw how they fell.”

The storm came as the country of some 6.6 million people is grappling with the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Credit: @Minerva_Juarez / Twitter

To date, El Salvador has reported 2,582 confirmed Covid-19 infections and 46 related deaths. It’s not been as hard hit as many other Latin American countries, but experts agree that the country is poorly equipped to handle any further strain.

“We are experiencing an unprecedented situation: one top-level emergency on top of another serious one,” said San Salvador Mayor Ernesto Muyshondt.

The country had already instituted some of the most strict lockdown measures across the region. Even a trip to the market is heavily regulated – you’re only allowed access depending on the numbers in your identity documents, and residents aren’t allowed to cross municipal boundaries, even to buy food or medicine.

The storm also lashed other countries across Central America.

Credit: @Minerva_Juarez / Twitter

Both Guatemala and Honduras were also badly hit by the storm. In Honduras, four were left dead after they were swept away by rising flood waters. Meanwhile, several communities were left buried under feed of mud and debris and mudslides happened across the country.

Two people were also killed and two injured in Guatemala, where authorities reported 500 homes damaged.

After weakening, the storm has now reformed as Tropical Storm Cristobal and could pose a risk to the U.S. Gulf Coast.

Credit: NOAA

Tropical Storm Amanda weakened after impacting Central America and then entered the Gulf of Mexico, where it’s since reorganized into a new Tropical Storm – this time named Cristobal. This marks the first time in history that there have been three named storms so early in the hurricane season. Typically, the third named storm does not brew until way later in the season, occurring on average around Aug. 13

The weather disturbance is expected to move through the Gulf of Mexico in the coming days, the U.S. National Hurricane Center said, and is likely to severely impact the Mexican coastline in the coming days.

The storm is expected to take a northward turn, and it could gain strength over the Gulf of Mexico prior to reaching the southern United States coastline.

Notice any needed corrections? Please email us at corrections@wearemitu.com