Culture

Will Mexican Fans Ever Stop The ‘P••o’ Chant At Soccer Games?

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If you’ve ever watched a fútbol match featuring Mexico’s national team or a club team from Mexico, you’re probably familiar with this chant:

Credit: Libey JhDyz / YouTube

Yep, the popular “Ehhhhhhhh… p**o” chant used to taunt goalkeepers. It’s been around for a little more than a decade.

Credit: Tómas Salinas / YouTube

According to Mediotiempo.com, the chant began gaining traction in the early 2000s, when fans of Guadalajara’s Atlas FC turned a harmless “Ehhhh… PUM” chant into the one you hear today. Eventually, the chant spread and became ubiquitous at games featuring Mexico’s national team.

Mexico fans gleefully used the chant at the 2014 World Cup and EVERYONE noticed. Here’s a clip from Mexico vs. Brazil:

Credit: Luis Corvini / YouTube

The whole world was watching, and the chant was audible during broadcasts of the matches. Soon, fans from other countries began asking themselves, “What’s with the ‘p**o’ chant?”

After hearing the chant from Mexico fans, Brazil’s fans began using the chant to taunt Mexico’s goalkeeper.

Credit: Mark Harpin / YouTube

And thanks to the World Cup, the chant even made its way to Japan.

Credit: Gigantes de la Costa MX / YouTube

During the tournament, many people criticized Mexico fans for using a “homophobic chant.”

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Credit: Miguel Tovar / Getty

Many pointed out that the word p**o, slang for “male prostitute,” is rooted in homophobia. In many countries, it’s used the same way as f****t. Mike Woitalla of Soccer America magazine told NPR: “The Mexican team is playing wonderful soccer, and their fans are traditionally wonderful fans, and right now, with this chant, they are bringing shame upon themselves.” Mexicans argued that in the context of the chant, the word p**o was just an insult – like the word “f****r” – and not meant to be homophobic.  FIFA, which investigated Mexico’s use of the chant, eventually agreed. FIFA officials declared that the chant “was not considered insulting in the specific context.”

This year, Mexico got a rude awakening – the Mexican soccer federation was fined $20,000 by FIFA after fans used the chant during a Mexico vs. El Salvador World Cup qualifying match.

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Credit: Hector Vivas / Getty

After being cleared in 2014, Mexico fans assumed the debate was over. But Mexico, along with Argentina, Chile, Peru and Uruguay, were fined earlier this year for using “insulting and discriminatory chants.”

Although federation officials said they would appeal the fine, Mexico’s federation president, Decio de Maria, recently told reporters that Mexico should work to eliminate the chant from games.

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Credit: Manuel Velasquez / Getty

In a press conference, de Maria said that it didn’t matter whether the chant is homophobic or not: “At the end of the day, it’s a chant that insults someone. I think as a society, we shouldn’t do that.”

READ: Here’s Why Rob Schneider Loves Mexican Soccer So Much

Where do you stand on the chants? Click on the share button below to discuss with your friends!

Mexican Officials Jailed This Donkey Because His Owners Didn’t Pay Their Property Taxes But The Donkey Is Finally Out Of Jail

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Mexican Officials Jailed This Donkey Because His Owners Didn’t Pay Their Property Taxes But The Donkey Is Finally Out Of Jail

@Abriendo_Brecha / Twitter

A burro walls free after spending more than 72 hours in a local Mexican jail. He was booked and thrown in there because his owners, a couple in their eighties, were unable to pay their property taxes. 

Together with the help of a local animal welfare group, the donkey is a free from the jail cell and is once again back with his owners. 

Animal lovers everywhere are celebrating the news of a burros release from jail.

A donkey has been freed from jail in San Sebastián Río Dulce, Oaxaca, after 72 hours behind bars through the efforts of an animal rights organizations.

The animal was arrested over the weekend for its owners’ inability to pay local taxes.

Pascual Cruz and Alejandra Mejía, both in their 80s, did not have the means to pay the taxes, which other residents have denounced as abusively high.

After hearing that the couple had been refused the right to take the donkey food and water during its detention, animal rights activists in the state united to file an animal cruelty case with the state Attorney General’s Office.

Oaxaca animal rights group president Hilda Toledo said that activists had planned on going to Río Dulce to protest but the town is considered dangerous and outsiders must solicit authorization to enter, so they chose the legal route.

It all started when a couple in their eighties allegedly didn’t pay taxes. 

A donkey was booked into the town jail in San Sebastián Río Dulce, Oaxaca, apparently for unpaid property taxes.

In a truly cruel move, the city’s tax agent ordered the animals arrest so that the elderly couple wouldn’t be able to transport the firewood they use for cooking. But  Pascual Cruz and Alejandra Mejía, 88 and 86-years-old respectively, say they’ve been caught up in a power struggle between groups trying to take control of local resources. 

Authorities in the Mexican state of Oaxaca came to seize the couple’s burro.

Even though the couple says they only use the burro for domestic uses around the house, not for economic gain, the tax agent seized the donkey and placed it in the town jail. 

The incarceration was denounced by the Network of United Animal Rights Activists of Oaxaca.

“It may not be of much interest or importance to others, but it is for the animal’s owners,” said the organization in a Facebook post, “given that it is one of their most valuable possessions, since they use it to transport firewood from the hills to their home.”

The burro was being held without food or water and many people around Mexico were upset by the animal cruelty.

The couple also claims to have been refused the right to take the animal food and water during several days of imprisonment.

Many people around the world were really concerned for the donkey – some even writing to PETA for help.

One Twitter user wrote to to PETA and. Arjona animal rights supporting celebrities including Ricky Gervais. It’s not clear if any of them were involved in the release of the burro. 

Strangely, this isn’t the first time a donkey has been placed under arrest and thrown behind bars.

Another Mexican donkey landed itself in jail after biting and kicking two men.

The animal was locked up in a holding pen normally used for keeping drunks off the streets after it lashed out at the pair at a ranch in Chiapas state. 

The owner of the angry burro, Mauro Gutierrez, was told that he‘d have to pay the injured men’s medical bills before the creature is released from custody.

Mexico And The World Mourn The Loss Of Celso Piña, One Of Mexico’s Greatest Musicians

Entertainment

Mexico And The World Mourn The Loss Of Celso Piña, One Of Mexico’s Greatest Musicians

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If there’s one instrument that best describes Mexican music is has to be the accordion. While the musical key instrument known as a squeezebox has its origins in Europe, it indeed came alive in Mexico as the staple sound in rancheras and cumbias. There is only one musician who thrived through the accordion sound, though sadly that is now a thing of the past.

Celso Piña, known as the “The Accordion Rebel,” died yesterday at the age of 66.

Credit: Instagram/@danonewillrise297

The Mexican musician was in his hometown of Monterrey, Mexico, and was soon scheduled to g on tour, but had a heart attack and died at the hospital.

La Tuna Group, Piña’s record label, confirmed in a statement that he died yesterday at 12:38 p.m. after suffering a heart attack.

Credit: Instagram/@mexicoprimero_

“Today is a sad day for La Tuna Group,” they stated, “Our deepest condolences to his family, friends, and followers. We are left with an intense emptiness, but he leaves us his great legacy forever. We appreciate respecting the privacy of the family.”

Piña seemed to have been in good spirits earlier in the day and tweeted for the final time. “No one can resist the cumbia,” he said.

The self-taught musician had been touring off and on for months. He also had upcoming shows in Georgia and Texas.

The Grammy-award winning musician had a musical career that spanned 40 decades, and aside from his musical stylings as an accordion player, he was also a composer, singer, and arranger.

Credit: Instagram/@patanegra_mx

Piña had collaborated with several contemporary artists including Lila Downs, Julieta Venegas, Cafe Tacvba, and Gloria Trevi, Variety reports. He was also more than a cumbia musician. His sound also fused into other musical genres, including norteña music, hip-hop, ska, reggae, and more.

Several celebrity fans and collaborators tweeted their heartfelt condolences.

According to the Grammy Academy, Piña got his hands on his first accordion in 1980. He taught himself how to play and performed with his brothers. “Together, they went on to play norteña and tropical music, eventually adding cumbia to their style,” the Academy states. “The brothers became known as ‘Celso Piña Y Su Ronda Bogotá,’ giving a nod to cumbia’s motherland.”

Fans on social media also expressed how much Piña meant to them.

One fan, @iphadra, tweeted, “his greatness of # CelsoPiña is not due to its successes or fame in the 5 continents. It is because it was he who came to claim the music of the marginalized.” @JJ4rmCh tweeted, Rest In Peace Celso Piña, no one fucked it up on an accordion like u did.” But this tweet we could totally relate to from @jennjenn1_  who tweeted, “It wasn’t a real quince or wedding until you played some #CelsoPiña ❤️🇲🇽 🎶🎶🎶 may his music live on for generations to come.”

Writer Melissa del Bosque had the honor of being able to interview him. She tweeted, “Hearing ‘Barrio Bravo’ for the first time was a life-changing experience. Celso Piña and Toy Hernández, of Control Machete, had created a whole new hybrid mixing Colombian cumbia with the anarchy of urban streets. I went directly to Monterrey to interview El Rebelde del Acordeón. Here we are at Cafe Brasil, one of his favorite haunts. As I wrote then, when ‘Cumbia Sobre el Rio hit the airwaves there wasn’t a car from Chicago to Chiapas that didn’t have the bass booming and the sonic onslaught layered with accordion rattling their windows.’ #RipCelsoPina.”

Last year, Piña visited one of his biggest fans, who is also an accordion player just like him. The two performed in the streets of Tamaulipas, Mexico.

Herrera recalled what it was like hearing that his musical idol had died. The young musician told El Universal that he was with his daughter when he heard the news that Piña had died. He said he couldn’t believe it, and all the memories from his incredible visit with him last year rushed back to him. He said it was a dream to have been able to perform with him. 

Here’s a couple of his most beloved and hit songs.

Here’s “Cumbia Sobre el Rio Suena” live and with an orchestra! He had such a distinct voice and sound. There was no one else like him.

“No Sea Conmigo”

This was his collaboration with Cafe Tacvba. So lovely! We dare you not to dance to this one.

What’s your favorite Celso Piña track? Let us know in the comment section below. Rest in power, Celso!!

READ: This Isn’t Your Mama’s Cumbia: The Eclectic History Of Latin America’s Classic Music Genre

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