Umm… Human Body Parts Washed Up At Brazil’s Olympic Beach Volleyball Site

credit: SteveAllenPhoto / Twenty20

The 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro are set to start August 5, and with all eyes falling on Brazil, there seem to be more and more problems bubbling to the surface. Perhaps it’s the increased international coverage on the city of more than 6 million people, or maybe things are just getting bad enough for the world to notice. Either way, the country is going through a very tumultuous time, and as they ready for the games, the world hopes that things will go OK as tourists, athletes and media converge in Rio.

 

Just a few days ago, human body parts washed up on the shore of Copacabana Beach.

Credit: @andresenior / Twitter

The human remains, which have yet to be identified, washed up on the same shore that will be holding the Beach Volleyball competition. The mangled body parts have so far been identified as belonging to a young adult, possibly a woman.

Yeah. Some random human remains are just washing up near future Olympic venues.

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Credit: The Monkees / NBC / allreactions / Tumblr

But that isn’t the only thing that has happened on Copacabana Beach before the Olympic Games.

Last month, the organization Rio da Paz staged a protest against Brazil’s growing and violent rape culture on the same beach.

Credit: @womenadvocates / Twitter

Protesters scattered 420 pairs of women’s underwear along the iconic Copacabana Beach and installed photos of women with red hands over their mouths. The protest was bringing attention to the silence associated with rape culture in Brazil. Every year, there are average 50,000 sexual assault incidents against women in Brazil that go vastly unreported.

The water in Rio de Janeiro is still questionable.

Credit: @rodmaia / Twitter

There have been conflicting reports on the viability of water sports taking place in the waters around Rio, but who wants to risk it? Clearly not the U.S. team, which has created special suits for the athletes competing in sailing, rowing and canoeing. The unisuits have been treated with an antimicrobial that will limit the exposure to bacteria in the water. The suits are really all that stand between the U.S. teams and some pretty gnarly illnesses.

Some police officers and firefighters say they don’t have resources to do their jobs.

Credit: @JoeVOrgill / Twitter

Recently, the above photo, which was taken at Rio de Janeiro–Galeão International Airport, went viral. The sign is being held up by police officers and firefighters who are protesting the working conditions and pay rate of emergency service professionals. Some police stations don’t even have toilet paper or fuel for their cars, not to mention stations without running water.

And it isn’t just the police and firefighters. Locals are warning tourists about the lack of medical care available.

Credit: @Cecillia / Tiago Bla / Twitter

Someone left this warning on a highway ramp, which reads, “Welcome, we don’t have hospitals!” They actually do have hospitals, but not all of them are safe. Recently, armed men stormed Souza Aguiar Hospital, one of the five Rio hospitals designated to treat tourists at the Olympics, to free a drug lord.

The Zika virus is still around, and there’s fear of a global crisis.

Credit: @greg_folkers / Twitter

Dr. Amir Attaran, faculty of medicine and faculty of law at the University of Ottawa, wrote a report calling for the Olympics to either be cancelled or postponed over fear that the disease could become a global crisis. The argument he laid out is that Rio de Janeiro, once thought to be minimally impacted by Zika, is actually one of the hardest hit states in Brazil. With an estimated 500,000 people descending onto the city from all over the world, Attaran believes the chances of a global outbreak increase significantly.

“Putting sentimentality aside, clearly the Rio 2016 Games must not proceed.” Dr. Attaran wrote.

Even some of Brazil’s top and most admired athletes are telling people to stay home.

Credit: @rivaldooficial / Instagram

Like Brazilian soccer legend Rivaldo Ferreira, who posted to social media to warn of the violence against women and children that is gripping Rio de Janeiro. In the post above, Rivaldo shares the story of a 17-year-old girl that was murdered in Rio de Janeiro by a group of men. Again, the violence against women in Brazil is seldom talked about.

And, not to mention, even the Olympic flame has seen the contempt of Brazilians. Like this man.

Credit: @MailOnline / Twitter

That’s right. If they aren’t killing a chained jaguar for trying to attack a soldier during a torch lighting ceremony, someone is trying to douse the flame with water. Seriously.


READ: Video Of Teen’s Gang Rape Uploaded To Social Media Sparks Outrage In Brazil

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