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This Venezuelan Prison Lets Inmates Dance, Drink And Shoot Guns

On Venezuela’s Margarita Island, you’ll find a prison that is nothing like you have ever seen. When you think of prison, you probably think about handball courts, free weights and solitary confinement cells. That’s not what goes down at San Antonio prison, which functions more like a resort that a typical correctional facility. It gives inmates so much freedom that some of them willingly return after their release.

This goes down at San Antonio prison. Seriously.

Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

That’s New York Times footage of inmates dancing to music played by a DJ. Yes, a DJ. In a prison.

The prison also has an annex for women, and the two sexes are allowed to commingle.

Credit: SBS Dateline / YouTube

The prison also features conjugal rooms set up for visits from significant others.

Prisoners can access luxuries like oysters for lunch, or hammocks for lounging around.

Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

“I found a restaurant, I found a place with barbecued chicken,” one inmate told the New York Post. “There are places to drink. It is not like a prison.”

They can also take a dip in a pool… or play a little pool.

Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

Drugs are openly consumed in San Antonio prison.

Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

Any drug from marijuana to crack is available and openly consumed in the prison.

But don’t let the party atmosphere fool you. Violence is still a problem at San Antonio Prison. They openly carry guns after all.

Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

Despite the fact that prisoners carry guns, inmates told The New York Times that compared to other prisons, “peace often prevails” in San Antonio.

Teófilo Rodríguez Cazorla, El Conejo, is the man behind this prison’s particular atmosphere.

Credit: @militzacrb / Twitter

As an inmate, he took over the prison by force and became its “Pran,” or boss. El Conejo told The New York Times the prison was a total disaster when he first arrived. He said there was no respect among the inmates, so he changed things up.

Earlier this year, El Conejo, who was still a prisoner, was killed outside of a nightclub. To honor his death, prisoners in San Antonio prison gave him a salute… with gun fire.

Credit: CLUB VENEZUELA / YouTube

Here are the armed guards near the prison during El Conejo’s send off.

Credit: Alan Hernández / YouTube

Check out dude in the bottom right corner. Clearly this isn’t his first run-in with the party prison. #BossLevel ?

But Iris Valera, who is the person in charge of the Venezuelan prison system, defends the culture within the prison.

Credit: reporteconfidencial.info/ militzacrb / Twitter

Yep, that’s her with the late Teófilo Rodríguez Cazorla. She told Argentine news agency Infobae that opening a “nightclub” and allowing for an improvement in the quality of life is how Venezuela is trying to keep prison violence low.

Inmates appear to enjoy the hedonistic atmosphere. Like this prisoner told SBS Dateline:

Credit: SBS Dateline / YouTube

“Yes. We’re prisoners but we live well.”

READ: Mexican Man Caught Stealing Trompo Meat from Taco Shop

Share this story with all your friends by tapping that share button below and just think about the fact that they are the prisoners…

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Democratic Senators Introduce Legislation to Grant Venezuelan Migrants Temporary Protected Status, Prevent Deportation

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Democratic Senators Introduce Legislation to Grant Venezuelan Migrants Temporary Protected Status, Prevent Deportation

Photo via Getty Images

After years of living in a state of uncertainty about their future, Venezuelan refugees in the U.S. might finally be granted long-term protection by the U.S. government.

On Monday, Democratic senators took the official steps towards granting Temporary Protected Status (TPS) to Venezuelan migrants in the U.S.

A similar resolution passed in the House in 2019, but was blocked by Republicans in the senate.

This time if passed, TPS could protect 200,000 Venezuelan citizens currently in the U.S, according to estimates from the Congressional Budget Office.

Although former President Trump issued a Deferred Enforced Departure decree (DED) on his final day in office, critics and immigration experts alike argue that this action didn’t go far enough.

“After four years of empty promises and deceit, nobody believes Donald Trump had an epiphany on his last day in office and decided to protect the hundreds of thousands of Venezuelans he was forcing into the shadows,” said New Jersey Democratic Senator Bob Menendez in a statement.

Indeed, Trump DED order only delayed deportation of undocumented Venezuelans for up to 18 months. But TPS would grant Venezuelan refugees protected status.

“TPS is an immigration status that can lead to a green card under President Joe Biden’s immigration proposal,” Miami-based immigration lawyer Laura Jimenez told NBC News.

“TPS is based in statute and is a legal immigration status, as opposed to Deferred Enforced Departure,” Menendez, who was born in New York City to Cuban immigrants, said. “That is why we are relaunching our campaign to actually stand with those fleeing the misery caused by the Maduro regime.”

Throughout his campaign, President Biden promised he would extend Temporary Protected Status to Venezuelan refugees, so now the refugee community wants to see him act on that promise.

Venezuela’s economy collapsed under the repressive regime of Nicolás Maduro, shrinking by approximately 64%.

Not only are there widespread food shortages and massive inflation, but Maduro’s critics are being jailed and silenced by other nefarious means.

Because of all this, the South American country facing what Bloomberg calls “a refugee crisis of unprecedented proportions.” As of now, some 5.4 million Venezuelans are in exile, with 600 more leaving the country every day.

But with the news of a likely extension of Temporary Protected Status to Venezuelans in the U.S., many Venezuelans are starting to feel optimistic about the future.

“Now, I feel like I’m really a part of this society and we keep supporting this country,” said Tampa resident Jennifer Infante to Bay News 9 about the recent Congressional news. “I think we deserve this opportunity because we came to make this country a better place and to keep moving forward.”

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Menendez Brother Of 1989 Murders Forced Into Solitary Confinement After Receiving Hoax Marijuana Package In Prison

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Menendez Brother Of 1989 Murders Forced Into Solitary Confinement After Receiving Hoax Marijuana Package In Prison

Photo by Kypros/Getty Images

Just when you thought the Menendez brothers would be out of the public eye for good, a bizarre story thrusts them back into the spotlight.

Back in October, TMZ reported that Erik Menendez (of the notorious Menendez brothers murder duo) had received a package of marijuana at the R.J. Donovan Correctional Facility in San Diego.

Before the package could reach Menendez’s hands, a prison official intercepted it. Shortly after, Menendez was moved into solitary confinement, as receiving recreational drugs in jail is definitely a no-go.

According to TMZ, prison officials were investigating whether Menendez “planned on either distributing the weed or using it as currency, or whether it was just for his personal use.” But now, the case is closed.

Per the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, “the investigation is complete and the allegations against him were unfounded.”

There is no word about who would have thought to send Erik Menendez a package of marijuana while he is literally in federal prison. Sounds like someone who is almost as unhinged as he is.

Erik Mendenez, along with his brother Lyle Menendez, are both serving life sentences without parole for the murder of their parents, José and Kitty, Menéndez in 1989.

Back in the day, the trial of the Cuban-American Menendez brothers captured the attention of the nation.

The crime was incredibly unusual. Not only was it uncommon for two children to team up on the murder of both their parents, but the Menendez brothers seemingly had it all. The Menendez family was extremely wealthy and the boys were incredibly privileged–Lyle even attended Princeton University before he was suspended for plagiarism.

On August 20, 1989, a hysterical Lyle Hernandez called 911, claiming his parents had been murdered in their Beverly Hills home. When police arrived at the scene, they found José and Kitty Menéndez dead. José had been shot five times, while Kitty had been shot 10 times.

At first, 21-year-old Lyle and and 18-year-old Erik played the roles of grieving sons perfectly, so police didn’t suspect them.

But soon, the boys’ facades began to unravel. In the months following their parents’ vicious murders, Erik and Lyle began to spend their late parents’ fortune with abandon, buying luxury purchases like expenses watches and private tennis lessons.

The lavish spending provided police with an otherwise-absent motive and they began to investigate the brothers for their parents’ murders. In March of 1990, both brothers were arrested for the murder of their parents.

The two brothers claimed that they had been tortured by years of physical and sexual abuse at the hands of their parents. The subsequent trial became a media sensation–America was fascinated by these rich, seemingly innocent young men who murdered their parents in cold blood. After a long and drawn-out trial, the brothers were sentenced to life imprisonment without parole in July of 1996. They have been serving out their sentences ever since.

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