Things That Matter

This Venezuelan Prison Lets Inmates Dance, Drink And Shoot Guns

The New York Times / YouTube

On Venezuela’s Margarita Island, you’ll find a prison that is nothing like you have ever seen. When you think of prison, you probably think about handball courts, free weights and solitary confinement cells. That’s not what goes down at San Antonio prison, which functions more like a resort that a typical correctional facility. It gives inmates so much freedom that some of them willingly return after their release.

This goes down at San Antonio prison. Seriously.

Dancing
Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

That’s New York Times footage of inmates dancing to music played by a DJ. Yes, a DJ. In a prison.

The prison also has an annex for women, and the two sexes are allowed to commingle.

Friends
Credit: SBS Dateline / YouTube

The prison also features conjugal rooms set up for visits from significant others.

Prisoners can access luxuries like oysters for lunch, or hammocks for lounging around.

Oysters
Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

“I found a restaurant, I found a place with barbecued chicken,” one inmate told the New York Post. “There are places to drink. It is not like a prison.”

They can also take a dip in a pool… or play a little pool.

pool-san-antonio
Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

Drugs are openly consumed in San Antonio prison.

Drugs
Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

Any drug from marijuana to crack is available and openly consumed in the prison.

But don’t let the party atmosphere fool you. Violence is still a problem at San Antonio Prison. They openly carry guns after all.

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Credit: The New York Times / YouTube

Despite the fact that prisoners carry guns, inmates told The New York Times that compared to other prisons, “peace often prevails” in San Antonio.

Teófilo Rodríguez Cazorla, El Conejo, is the man behind this prison’s particular atmosphere.

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Credit: @militzacrb / Twitter

As an inmate, he took over the prison by force and became its “Pran,” or boss. El Conejo told The New York Times the prison was a total disaster when he first arrived. He said there was no respect among the inmates, so he changed things up.

Earlier this year, El Conejo, who was still a prisoner, was killed outside of a nightclub. To honor his death, prisoners in San Antonio prison gave him a salute… with gun fire.

Shooting
Credit: CLUB VENEZUELA / YouTube

Here are the armed guards near the prison during El Conejo’s send off.

GuardsSayNo
Credit: Alan Hernández / YouTube

Check out dude in the bottom right corner. Clearly this isn’t his first run-in with the party prison. #BossLevel ?

But Iris Valera, who is the person in charge of the Venezuelan prison system, defends the culture within the prison.

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Credit: reporteconfidencial.info/ militzacrb / Twitter

Yep, that’s her with the late Teófilo Rodríguez Cazorla. She told Argentine news agency Infobae that opening a “nightclub” and allowing for an improvement in the quality of life is how Venezuela is trying to keep prison violence low.

Inmates appear to enjoy the hedonistic atmosphere. Like this prisoner told SBS Dateline:

LiveWell
Credit: SBS Dateline / YouTube

“Yes. We’re prisoners but we live well.”

READ: Mexican Man Caught Stealing Trompo Meat from Taco Shop

Share this story with all your friends by tapping that share button below and just think about the fact that they are the prisoners…

[Video] A Venezuelan Woman Is Sharing The Story Of Her Mother’s Tragic Death Through A Magically Hypnotic And Dark Act

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[Video] A Venezuelan Woman Is Sharing The Story Of Her Mother’s Tragic Death Through A Magically Hypnotic And Dark Act

daniadiaz.com

Women are magic — particularly Dania Díaz, who brought judges and audience members of “Spain’s Got Talent” to their feet with her entrancing card tricks that also told a heart-rending story.

The Venezuelan native, who had only been living in Spain for a few months before auditioning for the talent show, captivated viewers everywhere. The 28-year-old cleverly shared her story, from being a child in South America who lost her mother, to first discovering and falling in love with magic, to leaving her beloved country in the midst of a crisis to follow her dreams, through a deck of cards, wowing the audience, and at times bringing them to tears, with her incredible presentation.

Díaz shared her story of heart-ache through a magic trick on “Spain’s Got Talent.”

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Lo que hace esta chica emociona a todos! 😱😍

Posted by Lo Mejor De La Red on Wednesday, January 9, 2019

“I’m Dania, I’m a magician and I’m from Venezuela,” she says in Spanish while starting her show shuffling cards. 

“Venezuela is a very big country with more than 30 million inhabitants. 31,529,000 to be precise,” enthralling the previously confused audience as she lays out the cards 3,1, 5, 2 and 9.

Díaz, who continues to wow as she describes Venezuela’s sizable waterfalls through her deck, then begins to share her story. She has two brothers, Daniel and Leo, and was raised in a single-parent home.

“My mother was the queen of the house,” she says, pulling out a queen, “and my father, my father was not very present. In fact, I was happy to see him three or four times a month,” sliding his king card away from the queen.

But that’s not the saddest part of Díaz’s story. The magician reveals that at age 10, her mother suddenly and unexpectedly passed away.

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No solo me vine a reencontrar con mis personas favoritas en esta ciudad, sino que #Venezuela me sigue regalando amigos 🇻🇪 En 2018 conocí a #PattyCardozo una #GuaraEnEspaña, ella me seguía desde mucho antes de migrar a España y yo empecé a hacerlo justo cuando llegué, un día lleno de dudas me senté con ella y creo que fui uno de los tantos venezolanos que han hecho sesión con ella, admiro su proyecto de migracoaching porque atiende el tema emocional, pues no se trata de meter cosas en la maleta, sino de meter tu vida y tus afectos, apenas regresé coincidimos, y como si fueramos amigos de años, sin planificarlo mucho, todo se dio para volver a reirnos juntos. No se pierdan su proyecto en 👉🏼 @patty_cardozo 👜 En 2018 también conocí el talento de #DaniaDiaz que como muchos supimos de ella cuando se viralizó su participación en #SpainGotTalent, era #LaMagaVenezolana que nos sacó una lagrimita de alegría con su destreza en las cartas, con ese momentazo se ganó un lugar en mi #ConteoLos100Del2018 e incluso pasó a la segunda ronda del Top 25 elegido por el público. Llena de proyectos, esta lista para llenar a España con su magia, y si #DePuntoFijoPalMundo, no le pierdan pista como @daniadiaz1 ♣️ Que felicidad verlas emprendiendo, ellas como muchas más, demuestran que las mujeres venezolanas siempre resuelven, aquí nadie quiere que le regalen nada, solo necesitamos la oportunidad de demostrar lo que somos 👊🏼 #VenezolanosEnMadrid #AhoraQuienBajaALaSraDeAhi #ApreciationPostAlTumbaoDeDania

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“Our lives were never the same again. Mine took a 180-degree turn. I think of her 24 hours a day, seven days a week, 365 days a year,” she said, effortlessly drawing those numbers from her deck as she spoke.

It wasn’t until the-then child discovered magic that she found happiness again. One day, while watching television,  she saw a magician appear on a program. “My heart jumped for joy. I had fallen in love,” she said, tugging a hearts. 

Díaz has been a practicing magician for the last eight years. She immigrated to Spain, like many who leave Latin America, for an opportunity to fully realize her dreams.

“I came to Spain in search of a future, a future that in my country I could not have anymore. And even though I knew that many things awaited me along the way, what I did not expect was to fall in love: to love its culture, its food, and its people,” she said, flipping her cards to suddenly reveal words and images that illustrated what she was sharing.

The illusionist, who prompted laughter from the astonished crowd when she shared the two countries’ different vernacular, ended her demonstration with some inspiration.

“Despite all these differences, there is something we have in common, and that is that everyone in the world is in search for a dream,” she said, flipping cards to reveal related hand-drawn images. “No matter how chaotic your life is at this moment, I invite you to have a little patience, because little by little your life will take order, everything will have a meaning. I’m telling you, this story has taken me here.”

Díaz’s show left both the audience and some judges in tears. They all stood up in applause chanting “golden pass, golden pass.” She did, indeed, receive the pass and was sent into the semifinal of the auditions.

The performer, who now has more than 110 thousand followers on Instagram, is known around Latin America for her charismatic story-telling magic. In addition to her starlight audition, she has won awards, like the FLASOMA prize, given to her by the Latin American Federation of Magical Societies, as well as rewards from Chile, Colombia, Venezuela and the National Congress of Spain.

Díaz, who has performed in 11 countries, travels the world, bringing astonishment to thousands through her feel-good tricks. 

And she has shown for everyone. According to Díaz’s website, she does performances for families, which includes an interactive experience mixing magic, music, and stories that inspire viewers to laugh and dream; for adults, where she reads minds and swallows balloons; and even for business settings, which could be catered to the mission of the corporations. 

For those magic-lovers who are unable to see her live, Díaz also shows some of her mind-boggling tricks on her YouTube channel and on Instagram.

In one of her latest stunts, she takes on the viral bottle cap challenge, removing the top of a bottle without ever touching its lid. In another, she makes a wildly big coin appear, disappear and reappear in her hand.

After watching her magical short clips, you’ll understand why hundreds of thousands of people from across the world are stunned by the Venezuelan maga.

A City Is On Edge After One Of The World’s Most Wanted Men Escapes From A Prison In Central Uruguay

Things That Matter

A City Is On Edge After One Of The World’s Most Wanted Men Escapes From A Prison In Central Uruguay

AndyVermaut / Twitter

An Italian mafia boss known as the “cocaine king of Milan” has escaped from prison in Uruguay where he was awaiting extradition to Italy. He made a brazen escape from a prison located in the heart of Montevideo, Uruguay’s capital city.

Italian mob boss Rocco Morabito, known as the “Cocaine King of Milan,” escaped from an Uruguayan prison while awaiting extradition to Italy.

A manhunt was underway on Tuesday after an Italian mafia boss led a brazen jailbreak in the center of Uruguay’s capital, infuriating the Italian government that awaited his extradition.

Morabito – dubbed ‘the king of cocaine’ – was one of Italy’s most-wanted men and had been on the run for 23 years.

They made a daring escape through the detention center’s rooftop.

Credit: @USATODAY / Twitter

Rocco Morabito, 52, and three other inmates “escaped through a hole in the roof” of a police detention center in downtown Montevideo late on Sunday, before breaking into a neighboring apartment and exiting onto the street, Uruguay’s interior ministry said in a statement.

Elida Ituarte, a 70-year-old woman who lives in a fifth-floor apartment next to the jail, told AFP news agency she was startled to see four men in her living room at midnight on Sunday.

“What are you doing? Who are you?” she said she shouted. The oldest of the four, apparently Morabito, told her the caretaker had called them to fix a leaking pipe.

“I left the window open. As I live next to the prison, I felt safe and secure,” she said.

When Ituarte found the keys to let them out, the four men ran down the stairs and onto the street.

The jail is known as Montevideo’s Central Prison and is located on a busy street surrounded by apartments, restaurants, and shops.

The Italian government is not happy about the news.

Credit: @MercoPressNews / Twitter

Italy’s Interior Minister Matteo Salvini reacted angrily to the “disconcerting and serious” news.

“I make two commitments: first to shed full light on how he escaped, asking for an immediate explanation from the Montevideo government. Then we will continue the hunt for Morabito, wherever he is,” Salvini said.

It seems that Morabito had been living in Uruguay for quite a while before his capture.

Morabito, who obtained Uruguayan papers after presenting a false Brazilian passport in the name of Francisco Capeletto, is thought to have arrived in Uruguay in 2002, where he bought a luxurious villa in the southern coastal resort of Punta del Este.

A search of his properties uncovered 13 mobile phones, 12 bank cards, two cars, 150 passport-sized photos of him in various disguises plus a Portuguese passport, a number of jewels, about $50,000 in cash and a 9mm pistol.

Italian authorities blamed the escape on the long wait for extradition.

“It’s bad news,’’ said Nicola Gratteri, the anti-mafia chief prosecutor in the Italian city of Catanzaro. “Things like this can surely happen everywhere. The problem is that this is another side-effect of the long waiting times for the extraditions. It’s time for politicians to discuss new agreements with the South American countries, like the ones the authorities struck with Colombia a few years ago, that means criminals could now be extradited within 48 hours.’’

Morabito has spent nearly two and a half years in jail awaiting the formal extradition request by Italy. He had tried in various ways to evade extradition to Italy and had often insulted the judge at a recent hearing to try to get the proceedings suspended.

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