Its 2016 And Latino Veterans Are Getting Discharged, Then Deported

credit: Discharged, Then Deported / Facebook

Discharged, Then Deported is a new nonprofit that is trying to make the lives of military veterans better. The organization, which launched this week, will work with military veterans who served the United States as legal residents but were then denied citizenship and the basic medical assistance afforded to those who have fought for this country.

A new advocacy group, Discharged, Then Deported, is trying to make sure denial of medical services never happens again.

Credit: Discharged, Then Deported / Facebook
CREDIT: Credit: Discharged, Then Deported / Facebook

During a Sept. 19 press conference, Discharged, Then Deported chairman Nathan Fletcher laid out his coalition’s mission.

“As we see all too common with veterans, although they may have left the war, the war doesn’t always leave them. They struggle with post-service life. Oftentimes they turn to alcohol and substance abuse, and they run afoul of the law,” Fletcher stated. “After they had paid their debt to society for the actions they had taken, they were deported.”

That’s right. After fighting in a war for a country they love, some military veterans have been forcibly deported and denied medical treatment.

Credit: Parks And Rec. / NBC / hola105 / Tumblr
CREDIT: Credit: Parks And Rec. / NBC / hola105 / Tumblr

According to a report by the American Civil Liberties Union of California, there have been at least 239 cases of military vets deported in the state alone.

“By requiring deportation and stripping immigration courts of the power to consider military service, the United States government abandons these veterans by expelling them to foreign countries at the moment when they most need the government’s help to rehabilitate their lives after service,” Bardis Vakili, a senior staff attorney with the ACLU of California, said in a press release. “This is a tragic and disgraceful example of how broken our immigration system is.”

Immigration advocates are using the ACLU report to make sure that our boys who deal with conflict like this get the care they deserve.

According to The San Diego Union Tribune, California Rep. Juan Vargas will be introducing three new bills to try and help veterans who might face deportation due to our broken immigration system. The first would make naturalization information more accessible to military personnel, the second would create a tracking system so the government can keep tabs of the non-citizen military members, and the third will allow for those same non-citizens to enter the country to get any necessary medical treatments.

Let’s hope that soon we will see brave men and women coming home after war to this…

Credit: kaycehughes / BlogSpot
CREDIT: Credit: kaycehughes / BlogSpot

…rather than this.

Credit: LaSantaCeciliaVEVO / YouTube
CREDIT: Credit: LaSantaCeciliaVEVO / YouTube

Learn more about Discharged, Then Deported by tapping here. You can read the full ACLU report here.

READ: There’s a New Movie About ‘Green Card Soldiers’ Who Fight In The U.S. Military

Share this story with all of your friends by tapping that little share button below!