Entertainment

This Olympic Proposal Totally Stole The Show

Olimpíada não é para os fracos. Emoção atrás de emoção. O Rugb…MOMENTO FOFURA OLÍMPICA! O Brasil Rugby teve sua boa campanha coroada após a final entre Austrália e Nova Zelândia. Marjorie, gerente de esportes do Estádio de Deodoro, pegou o microfone e mandou ver. Pediu Isadora Cerullo, a Izzy, em casamento! #Rio2016NoSporTV #AmorNoSporTV #SomosTodosCampeões

Posted by SporTV on Monday, August 8, 2016

“I wanted to show people that love wins.”

This year’s Olympics have been full of historic firsts, moments of LGBTQ visibility and devastating upsets but one couple has taken gold in Olympic love. Marjorie Enya, a manager at Deodoro Stadium, and Isadora Cerullo, a rugby player for the Brazilian Olympic team, have been together for two years when the Brazilian team finished in 9th at the Olympic Games. “As soon as I knew she was in the squad I thought I have to make this special,” Enya told BBC Sport.

And Enya made good on her promise to make Cerullo’s time at the Olympics truly magical.

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Credit: SporTV / Facebook

After Brazil played their final game, Enya decided it was time to take their relationship to the next level and proposed in front of volunteers and players. Enya told BBC Sports that she knew the rest of the team would celebrate their engagement so it felt like the right time to pop the question.

“The Olympic Games can look like closure but, for me, it’s starting a new life with someone,” Enya told BBC Sports. “I wanted to show people that love wins.”

Congratulations, ladies! ?❤️

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Credit: Isadora Cerullo / Facebook

Love is love is love is love is love.

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Credit: SporTV / Facebook

READ: This Latino Is Bringing The U.S.A. Its First Medal For Boxing In 8 Years

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Bad Bunny’s ‘Yo Perreo Sola’ Music Video Has Drag, Female Empowerment, And Artistic Styling That Is World-Class

Entertainment

Bad Bunny’s ‘Yo Perreo Sola’ Music Video Has Drag, Female Empowerment, And Artistic Styling That Is World-Class

Bad Bunny / YouTube

Bad Bunny is known to push gender norms and supports the LGBTQ+ community. His music videos are artistic expressions of the world he wants to live in. His latest music video for the song “Yo Perreo Sola” is catching everyone’s attention for several reasons including the trapero singing and dancing in full drag.

Bad Bunny starts his “Yo Perreo Sola” music video in a hot red leather drag outfit.

Like, dayum. The Puerto Rican trap star did not hold back. His look was everything as he gave us some “Oops…I Did It Again” dominatrix vibes. The fans were not prepared for this but it seems that most of them are all for Bad Bunny pushing boundaries even further in Latin trap.

The imagery is literally being celebrated for its strong statement for the LGBTQ+ community.

Bad Bunny was very outspoken about Alexa Negrón Luciano, a trans woman who was murdered in Puerto Rico and misgendered in media reports. The singer was on “The Late Show starring Jimmy Fallon” and used the moment to protest the treatment of Luciano’s legacy. Bad Bunny wore a shirt that read in Spanish, “They killed Alexa, not a man in a skirt.”

Bad Bunny fans were ready to defend their fave and his new music video.

To many, Latin trap is still a place where homophobia and misogyny fester in lyrics by some of the top performers. Bad Bunny is one artist that has been fighting against that culture from within. He has bent gender norms in music videos and it has set his career apart from other Latin trap musicians.

And they are all celebrating the anguish of straight men who listen to Bad Bunny and have social hang-ups.

The same homophobia in Latin trap is reflected within the community. Bad Bunny’s unapologetic willingness to take gender and flip it on its head is just one thing fans love about the trapero.

You can watch the full video below.

Bad Bunny never disappoints, does he?

READ: Bad Bunny Is The Modern Icon The Queer Latino Community Needs And Deserves Right Now. Here’s Why

Indigenous Tribes In South America Blockade Their Villages In Preparation To COVID-19 Pandemic

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Indigenous Tribes In South America Blockade Their Villages In Preparation To COVID-19 Pandemic

CDC / Unsplash

The world has been fixated on the coronavirus as it has spread from Wuhan, Hubei Province, China to every continent, except Antarctica. More than 40,600 people have died of the disease that has infected more than 820,000 people across six continents. So far, more than 174,000 have recovered from the illness. Now, the disease is in Latin America and we are going to keep you updated on its spread.

Update March 31, 10:46 a.m. PST: Indigenous tribes in South America are blockading their villages to protect themselves from COVID-19.

Indigenous communities around the world are preparing to ride out the COVID-19 health pandemic the best way they can. Some indigenous leaders are asking for help to protect their communities from COVID-19. Many indigenous tribes are voluntarily isolated from the rest of the world leaving them particularly vulnerable to diseases. This is because their isolation has left them with no immunity or protection from most diseases.

“We call on governments to intensify surveillance and protection of indigenous territories, many of which are invaded by miners, drug traffickers, loggers, land-grabbers and tourists,” Claudette Labonte, a member of the Kamuyeneh community in French Guiana and a member of the Congress of Indigenous Organizations of the Amazon Basin (COICA), told AFP.

Labonte continued to argue that government help is needed because of the illegal miners and others who are using the pandemic as a way to encroach on the protected indigenous lands. These moments could lead to the indigenous people being infected by sick loggers and miners.

Update March 24, 11:06 a.m. PST: Global economists and health experts warn that Mexico is not prepared for the outbreak.

Most of the world’s governments are grappling with how to better handle the COVID-19 outbreak. However, Mexico seems to be dragging their feet when it comes to responding to the health pandemic that has shut down one-third of the United States. In stark contrast to most major international cities, Mexico City remains open and bustling as the Mexican president calls for calm from citizens.

President Andrés Manuel López Obrador has led his country into a “business as usual” mentality. According to reports, President López Obrador doesn’t want to impose major lockdowns and restrictions until absolutely necessary. This kind of attitude, economist and health experts warn, would lead to an outbreak worse than what the world saw in Italy.

The country’s stock market has already started to strain under the pressure of COVID-19. Economists warn that the outlook for Mexico’s stock market is grim but the president, through action, could ease the full impact.

Update March 17 – 11:22 a.m. PST: The number of cases in Latin America continues to climb as El Salvador implemented nationwide quarantine.

“I know this will be criticized, but let’s put ourselves in Italy’s shoes. Italy wishes they could’ve done this before,” Salvadoran President Nayib Bukele said in a national address. “Our health system is not at Italy’s level. It’s not at South Korea’s level.”

President Bukele’s national quarantine means that schools are closed for three weeks, gatherings of more than 500 people are banned, foreign travelers from high-risk countries are barred from entering the country, and all Salvadorans returning from trips abroad will be quarantined for 30 days.

Puerto Rico has implemented an island-wide curfew to combat the spread of the virus.

Puerto Rican Governor Wanda Vázquez reprimanded Puerto Ricans for not obeying guidance to self-isolate and practice social distancing. In response, Gov. Vázquez instituted a curfew from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m. and shut most businesses on the island until March 30. The only people exempt are supermarkets, banks, pharmacies, medical equipment stores, gas stations, restaurants offering take out and delivery, and their suppliers. Violators face a $5,000 fine or six months in jail for breaking the executive order.

Update March 13 – 1:24 p.m.: The novel coronavirus has been reported in Venezuela.

To cases have been confirmed in Venezuela. The South American country is in a yearslong battle over their government that has left them with no medicine, little food, and a devastated economy. Doctors in Venezuela fear that the coronavirus could pose a major threat to hospitals that might be overwhelmed with patients that cannot be treated.

The virus has also entered Panama, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Colombia, Cuba, Bolivia, and Paraguay.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro recently contradicted earlier reports that he tested positive for the coronavirus.

Update: President Trump has backpedaled on his plan to close the southern border in response to the coronavirus concern.

Credit: @SenJeffMerkley / Twitter

President Trump originally announced that he was considering closing the southern border with Mexico because of concerns about the coronavirus. At the time, Mexico had 5 confirmed cases of the virus while the U.S. had more than 80. On March 3, Trump changed his messaging and said they aren’t invested in the decision due to a lack of evidence.

Brazil, Mexico, Ecuador, Chile, Argentina, and the Dominican Republic have all reported cases of COVID-19.

Ecuador is currently grappling with the highest number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Latin America. Seven people have tested positive after a woman in her 70s tested positive for coronavirus in February after visiting Madrid. The woman is in critical condition. In Mexico, where there are 5 confirmed cases, first detected the virus in two men who had recently traveled to northern Italy. The Dominican Republic has reported one case who is an Italian national visiting the island. Brazil diagnosed a second case, who is a 32-year-old patient in São Paulo. A 32-year-old man was diagnosed as the first coronavirus patient in Argentina after a trip to northern Italy. Chile reported a patient who had recently spent time in Singapore.

The first case of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19 has been reported in Brazil.

Credit: @yehudafruchter / Twitter

The first case in Latin America was confirmed in Brazil. The patient, a 61-year-old man who was in northern Italy for business, tested positive for COVID-19 after returning to São Paulo. The man checked himself into a hospital when he began to show signs of a fever, sore throat, and a cough.

Brazil’s Carnival celebrations have begun and the possibility of an outbreak is weighing heavily on some Brazilians.

Credit: @Richierlich / Twitter

According to The New York Times, Brazil Health Minister Luiz Henrique Mandetta is optimistic that they will be able to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. However, former Health Minister José Gomes Temporão notes that the Brazilian government has been hit with spending cuts in recent years.

“We are cutting resources to public health, and we will need additional resources now,” Temporão told The New York Times.

Brazil has reportedly been working in preparing for the coronavirus for weeks leading up to Carnival.

Credit: @BombergerDanny / Twitter

Despite the work, many fear that Brazil’s under budget and overstressed public health system might not be able to handle an outbreak. However, health officials told The New York Times that it appears that the Albert Einstein Israelite Hospital in São Paulo acted quickly using best practices to admit and quarantine the sick man.

The coronavirus has shown up in 38 countries on six continents around the world, including the U.S.

Credit: @Farenthold / Twitter

There are currently more than 50 cases of the coronavirus that have been reported in the U.S. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention is warning Americans of the possibility of a more aggressive plan to limit the spread of the virus. The virus is spreading quickly across the world since it was first detected and reported in Wuhan, China at the end of December 2019.

President Donald Trump has come under fire from health officials for not understanding the true magnitude of the virus.

Credit: @realDonaldTrump / Twitter

The CDC issued a troubling warning of the virus the same day President Trump claimed that the coronavirus won’t have a large impact on the U.S. population. According to the CDC, they expect the virus to spread widely enough in the U.S. to cause a “disruption to everyday life.”

In a statement on the website, the CDC calls COVID-19 “a serious public health risk.” While it is not currently recognized as spreading in the U.S., the CDC does have a plan ready in case the virus begins to spread in U.S. communities.

“Community-level nonpharmaceutical intervention might include school dismissals and social distancing in other settings (e.g., postponement or cancellation of mass gatherings and telework and remote-meeting options in workplaces),” reads the CDC website. “These measures can be disruptive and might have societal and economic impact on individual persons and communities. However, studies have shown that early layered implementation of these interventions can reduce the community spread and impact of infectious pathogens such as pandemic influenza, even when specific pharmaceutical treatments and vaccines are not available. These measures might be critical to avert widespread COVID-19 transmission in U.S. communities.”

An earlier video from the CDC claims the risk of infection is low but for people to use tactics used to prevent the spread of the flu.

The CDC warns that people need to be vigilant about staying home from work, school, social gatherings, and other social activities if they are sick. The coronavirus symptoms are similar to the flu with a fever, coughing, and shortness of breath. The CDC is asking for people to remain vigilant as we are in the time of year where other illnesses with similar symptoms, like the flu and common cold, are spreading in the U.S.

If you would like to learn more about COVID-19 and what to do if you think you have contracted the virus, click here and read what the CDC recommends.

READ: Four Year Old Left Blind After She Caught A Severe Case Of The Flu—Her Parents Have A Message: Get Your Child Vaccinated